00:00
00:00

Reviews for "Eclipse."

eh.

well, it wasn't bad. i thought it was a little tedious as far as gameplay goes, but a very interesting concept. as far as first games go, not bad. not bad at all. i hope to see more from you in the future. a little experience and you could do wonderfully.
oh, and i agree with zerogravman. fantastic music.
i'd give it a 7/10 if you were a veteran to these things, but considering it's your first flash, i give it an 8/10. keep up the good work, bud.

game:fun Music:atomosphereic I WANT THAT MUSIC

but i do have a question, where can i get this awesome music? if u made it please upload it, i so want to be able to download that track. its just so apocalyptic. i love it please reply

Eh. Buggy,

Parts of the ring go dark, and will not light up again. Going dark isn't helpful in general, anyway, since it goes so dark you can't see what colour they are.

pepperpunk responds:

The rings going dark is the entire point of the game, you make them all go dark to complete a level, as stated in the first line of the tutorial.

I did try to cater for the minority who auto-click skip on every tutorial in every game they play, the tutorial is broken down into small sentences accompanied by animations, can be re-displayed by pressing help/tutorial (and it's context sensitive too... e.g. if you're on level 2, it'll show you the page about earthquakes), and the hover-tooltips are there so players don't have to remember what the powers do, or even read any line of the tutorial... other than the first one, it seems. :(

Only problems I had

The multi-click glitch Kadorja mentioned (if you click a button rapidly (say, for instance, turn the wheel), so that you click it again before the motion is finished, it will count the second click, but will not perform a second motion on it. Thus it wastes a move and a count.

Also, the background story was rather nice but I think more could have been done with it (for instance, an ending. Perhaps what you had been doing the whole game was the creation of the Earth?) Once I hit level 20 I had nothing to tell me I had beaten the game other than the fact there were no more levels on screen and the last level in the walkthrough is level 20. Some sort of user gratification would be nice.

pepperpunk responds:

Unfortunately there's not much I can do about this one... I fixed it in testing by disabling the button while the animation played, but then people complained that the button was "broken" because their clicks did nothing while the animation was playing. I did think of a complicated workaround, but couldn't figure out how to make it work properly at the time. With this and other small bugs, they're unfortunately down to me being more of an artist than a programmer. That said, I've learnt a lot more recently, and will try my best to make my next release rock solid.

Also, agreed on the ending, I'll make sure my next game has another animation at the end and maybe a few extra secret unlockables for people who get above average scores. :)

Not Original

Nicely done, well laid out, but, this isn't original and unique like everyone is saying. Assassins Creed 2 did these exact same puzzles in this exact same style when you found the glyphs, and I'm sure it's been done before even then.

pepperpunk responds:

I haven't played that game, but I did look it up online now that you mentioned it.
From what I can see, the rotary minigames in AC2 simply use the rotation mechanic to align rings, there are no earthquakes, volcanoes etc. to switch between tiles or change tiles and the playing fields aren't planets.

Anyway, it doesn't surprise me that something similar has been done before, with 6 billion+ humans on the planet it's quite hard to make something entirely original, even if you've never personally seen the idea before. I was chatting with the developer of Steambirds the other day and even a game as original as his had already been done, he managed to find similar mechanics in a series of old games stretching all the way back to the 80s despite not knowing about them until after he'd made the prototype.