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InnerChild548
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Response to Linux Users Club 2013-01-13 02:42:03 Reply

mint 14 w/ cinnamon. it's great


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Response to Linux Users Club 2013-01-13 06:29:14 Reply

At 1/13/13 02:42 AM, InnerChild548 wrote: mint 14 w/ cinnamon. it's great

I didn't realise that they'd released 14. I might upgrade at some point today since I'm still on Mint 13 with Cinnamon. Anything massively different about it?


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InnerChild548
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Response to Linux Users Club 2013-01-15 22:57:01 Reply

At 1/13/13 06:29 AM, Dean wrote:
At 1/13/13 02:42 AM, InnerChild548 wrote: mint 14 w/ cinnamon. it's great
I didn't realise that they'd released 14. I might upgrade at some point today since I'm still on Mint 13 with Cinnamon. Anything massively different about it?

http://www.linuxmint.com/rel_nadia_whatsnew.php

anyways maybe 2013 will be our year

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Zanthas
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Response to Linux Users Club 2013-01-16 03:57:56 Reply

Fedora 18 just got released yesterday!
Codename: Spherical Cow

I tried the Live CD, it seems alright. Installer didn't work for me, since my partition scheme is not GPT.

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Response to Linux Users Club 2013-01-20 23:03:53 Reply

I'm currently dual-booting Xubuntu 12.4 and Windows 7 (Xubuntu on one partition, Windows on a second, and a shared home folder on the third). Xubuntu keeps bugging me about upgrading to 12.10. However, I want to back up my files beforehand and, well, I'm lazy. I'll probably just wait until 13.4 rolls around before I upgraded.

On a side note, I recently installed Xubuntu 12.10 on my shared family desktops (because I got tired of trying to fix Windows from halfway across the country), and I noticed that Synaptic was no longer installed in the regular install CD. Ubuntu Software Center is ok, but I've been using Synaptic for the past 5 years, and it just makes more sense to me. Anyone know why Synaptic was cut/if it was cut in Ubuntu, as well?


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Zanthas
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Response to Linux Users Club 2013-01-21 15:37:06 Reply

At 1/20/13 11:03 PM, Echnaret wrote:
On a side note, I recently installed Xubuntu 12.10 on my shared family desktops (because I got tired of trying to fix Windows from halfway across the country), and I noticed that Synaptic was no longer installed in the regular install CD. Ubuntu Software Center is ok, but I've been using Synaptic for the past 5 years, and it just makes more sense to me. Anyone know why Synaptic was cut/if it was cut in Ubuntu, as well?

Because Ubuntu is trying to push their Package Manager Front End (Software Center was Created by Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu), and because they're trying to make GNU/Linux easier to use for the average user. I don't really like it all to much myself, but it seems okay. I don't use Ubuntu though, so I don't really have to deal with it, unless I'm working on my mother's computer (I installed Ubuntu 12.10 for her). The bad thing about Software Center is that it makes libraries hard to install and other miscellaneous dependencies, because they are hidden from the search, and only major programs, (like Chromium, or Brassero) appear in the search results.
I usually just use the terminal to install things. You could always remove the software center just do (In a Terminal):
sudo apt-get remove software-center
and to get Synaptic back:
sudo apt-get install synaptic


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Response to Linux Users Club 2013-02-05 21:17:04 Reply

Wow, a Linux club! I use the new Ubuntu 12.10.


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Response to Linux Users Club 2013-02-06 04:17:23 Reply

At 2/5/13 09:17 PM, AliMaredia wrote: Wow, a Linux club! I use the new Ubuntu 12.10.

How are you liking it?


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Response to Linux Users Club 2013-02-12 20:33:47 Reply

I just tried out Mint 14 and I'm already in love with it. I'm still a die hard Arch user but Mint is in my favorite distro list. Thanks Zanthas for showing me this thread.

I love people assume VI editor is hostile to beginners. Commands are difficult to remember, but once remember it, VI is the tool of thunder and totally beats pico.

What's your favorite text editor?

Sidenote: Good bye Ubuntu.

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Response to Linux Users Club 2013-02-13 04:53:27 Reply

At 2/12/13 08:33 PM, Elitistinen wrote: I just tried out Mint 14 and I'm already in love with it. I'm still a die hard Arch user but Mint is in my favorite distro list. Thanks Zanthas for showing me this thread.

Not really a fan of Mint myself. I'd rather just install Ubuntu minimal and a put Cinnamon/MATE on it. I hear lots of people love it though. I just don't like head dev. And no problem man, I'm glad this thread is getting some activity. I guess NG doesn't really use GNU/Linux all that much, probably cause Flash.

I love people assume VI editor is hostile to beginners. Commands are difficult to remember, but once remember it, VI is the tool of thunder and totally beats pico.

What's your favorite text editor?

Don't really have a favorite editor yet. I use Emacs, Vim and Geany. I want to stick to one though, since it will be easier to code things once i learn all the keybindings of one of them intimately.

I actually use nano/pico the most, haha.


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Dean
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Response to Linux Users Club 2013-02-13 07:37:00 Reply

At 2/13/13 04:53 AM, Zanthas wrote: I actually use nano/pico the most, haha.

Yea, if I'm using an in terminal editor, I use nano. No real reason for that choice other than it was the first one I was introduced to but I don't really use it for writing code. I'd only really use it if I'm wanting to edit a file quickly.

Speaking of Mint 14, I've still not actually upgraded. Right now it's just more hassle for me so I'll wait until I'm done with this uni semester. I just don't want to upgrade the OS when I'm in the middle of projects and stuff. I might even try some other distros when I actually get around to upgrading. I've used Ubuntu in the past but stopped when they introduced Unity. I've used Fedora for a while but didn't like their lack of minimise button. which you can probably configure yourself but I dunno, I didn't like that feature (or lack of).


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Response to Linux Users Club 2013-02-13 16:06:46 Reply

At 2/13/13 07:37 AM, Dean wrote: Yea, if I'm using an in terminal editor, I use nano. No real reason for that choice other than it was the first one I was introduced to but I don't really use it for writing code. I'd only really use it if I'm wanting to edit a file quickly.

Exactly this. I use nano for quick editing. It's nice and simple and it was my first editor on GNU/Linux too.

I've used Ubuntu in the past but stopped when they introduced Unity. I've used Fedora for a while but didn't like their lack of minimize button. which you can probably configure yourself but I dunno, I didn't like that feature (or lack of).

Well, you can always switch your desktop environment in Ubuntu (or in any distro). Unity is just a shell for GNOME 3. And as for Fedora, that sounds like you used GNOME3 as well, with the GNOME shell. Yeah I don't like the fact the gnome has forsaken the traditional desktop metaphor either. GNOME3 is actually a lot better than it used to be, though. It used to be so laggy and unresponsive, its much faster now. And it can look pretty too, if done right. I still like GNOME2 better though and its fork MATE.

Cinnamon is kinda nice too. Much more polished than before, on congratulation the Mint devs on that.


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Response to Linux Users Club 2013-02-14 09:03:59 Reply

At 2/13/13 04:06 PM, Zanthas wrote: Well, you can always switch your desktop environment in Ubuntu (or in any distro).

Well, once the academic year is over and I've completed the things I'm currently working on I'll probably have a shot of several distros. Right now I have my eye on Arch Linux. I know it's meant for the more advanced Linux users but I think it'd be a good learning experience and give me a better understanding of whats going on. I've been using Linux for the past 3-4 years and I still don't consider myself to be all that knowledgable about it. So I'm hoping that if I use a bare minimum distro like Arch, I'd learn more about what's going on.

As for a window manager, I think I'll give Fluxbox a shot. I was watching someone sort of review it on YouTube and I liked the look of it. Simplistic yet very customisable. I liked that.


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Response to Linux Users Club 2013-02-14 20:00:11 Reply

I'll probably be messing about with Linux distros sooner than I imagined. I felt like it was time to see if I could get a new laptop that has decent specs without having to spend too much. I went on eBay and found a company who sell refurbished laptops.

Intel Core i5-2540m @ 2.6GHz
8GB DDR3 RAM
320GB HDD @ 7200rpm
14.1 inch LED backlit monitor at 1600x900
Comes with Windows 7 Pro I think.

It's a Lenovo ThinkPad T420 which was released in February 2011 I believe. I paid about £400 for that and the specs are much better than those of my MacBook Pro and my current desktop. Hopefully it should arrive on Monday. I'm a little anxious to see what it's like because it is a refurbished laptop that was previously used, so it's likely to have little scratches and/or usage marks. Never tried a refurbished laptop so I hope this risk pays off.

Seems like a pretty good laptop for the price though, right?


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Response to Linux Users Club 2013-02-15 07:42:19 Reply

At 2/14/13 09:03 AM, Dean wrote:
At 2/13/13 04:06 PM, Zanthas wrote: Well, you can always switch your desktop environment in Ubuntu (or in any distro).
Well, once the academic year is over and I've completed the things I'm currently working on I'll probably have a shot of several distros. Right now I have my eye on Arch Linux. I know it's meant for the more advanced Linux users but I think it'd be a good learning experience and give me a better understanding of whats going on. I've been using Linux for the past 3-4 years and I still don't consider myself to be all that knowledgable about it. So I'm hoping that if I use a bare minimum distro like Arch, I'd learn more about what's going on.

If your primary goal is to learn, I'd recommend Slackware. I don't find Slackware viable as a modern operating system, but I've never learned as much about gnulinux as I did when tinkering with Slackware. Although I can't really say much about Arch, I used it as my main distro for many years ago, but I honestly don't remember much from that time.

At 2/14/13 08:00 PM, Dean wrote: I'll probably be messing about with Linux distros sooner than I imagined. I felt like it was time to see if I could get a new laptop that has decent specs without having to spend too much. I went on eBay and found a company who sell refurbished laptops.

Intel Core i5-2540m @ 2.6GHz
8GB DDR3 RAM
320GB HDD @ 7200rpm
14.1 inch LED backlit monitor at 1600x900
Comes with Windows 7 Pro I think.

It's a Lenovo ThinkPad T420 which was released in February 2011 I believe. I paid about Ã'£400 for that and the specs are much better than those of my MacBook Pro and my current desktop. Hopefully it should arrive on Monday. I'm a little anxious to see what it's like because it is a refurbished laptop that was previously used, so it's likely to have little scratches and/or usage marks. Never tried a refurbished laptop so I hope this risk pays off.

Seems like a pretty good laptop for the price though, right?

I hope you will enjoy it and find it worth the price you paid, but may I ask what you need all that power for? I usually buy used Thinkpads and I can't fathom spending more than £150 for a laptop. Is there something I'm missing out on?

Since you mention anxiety for the condition of the laptop, I had a frightening experience when I received my T60. The plastic cover in front of the harddisk slot was missing and the caddy that the harddisk was supposed to be attached to was also missing. The harddisk was basically held in place by a folded piece of paper jammed between the chassis and the harddisk itself. If you tilted the laptop and started shaking it, it would slide right out. There were also random screws missing and if you weren't careful you could rip the palmrest off while opening the lid.

On the plus side, it had the 1400x1050 Flexview monitor and in great condition too, and everything with the laptop worked fine. There are about two hundred scratches on the surface of the lid, but I don't mind. It also smells better than the T61p I gave to my father.


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Response to Linux Users Club 2013-02-15 07:46:36 Reply

At 2/14/13 09:03 AM, Dean wrote:

:I'm hoping that if I use a bare minimum distro like Arch, I'd learn more about what's going on.

Honestly, any distro can teach you more about Linux and GNU. People tend to think for some reason Arch can do that more though. Can't really blame them. Arch is minimal though, although most distros package a minimal version as well.. Even Ubuntu has a minimal version. Another popular thing Arch is the pacman package manager, and the AUR, (Arch User Repository) which is kind of like Ubuntu's PPAs. Most people use yaourt, (an unofficial package search and installer) with the AUR to get access to things the regular Arch repos don't have. No package signing though, so be careful what you install from there, although most should be fine.

As for a window manager, I think I'll give Fluxbox a shot. I was watching someone sort of review it on YouTube and I liked the look of it. Simplistic yet very customisable. I liked that.

I use Fluxbox. It's very nice. I love it. Openbox is another popular alternative to it. I like Flux more, since editing the config is easier, and it has a native panel which Openbox lacks.

This is my current Flux setup.

At 2/14/13 08:00 PM, Dean wrote: Seems like a pretty good laptop for the price though, right?

Yeah it does. Plus Thinkpads tend to be high quality laptops. You made a good choice.


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Response to Linux Users Club 2013-02-15 09:24:03 Reply

At 2/15/13 07:42 AM, KevinHR wrote: I hope you will enjoy it and find it worth the price you paid, but may I ask what you need all that power for? I usually buy used Thinkpads and I can't fathom spending more than Ã'£150 for a laptop. Is there something I'm missing out on?

Currently I have an old Dell Inspiron 530 as my primary desktop computer. It has an Intel Core 2 Duo @ 2.5GHz, 2GB RAM and Intel G31 Express Chipset. This thing is fine for internet Browsing and stuff, but at one point I was wanting to try working with OpenGL and the graphics chipset isn't really up to scratch. Wasn't particularly keen on upgrading this PC either since it is rather old.

I also have a 13 inch MacBook Pro. It would have been one of the 2009 models, I think. Intel Core 2 Duo @ 2.26GHz, 2GB DDR3 RAM and a NVIDIA GeForce 9400M graphics processor. It still does me fine I guess but... it's a Mac. I don't particularly like using Mac OS so I used to dual book XP on there. It has a really nice build quality to it but using a Mac keyboard when running Windows is a little awkward.

So basically I wanted something to replace my desktop but didn't really have the budget to go all out on a good desktop. At the same time, if I was getting a laptop, I also wanted something that'd better my MacBook Pro's specs and something with a slightly larger display. So yea, since this was going to be my new primary machine and I saw those specs for £400, I thought I might as well get it. I mean hopefully that laptop should last me a while. I was after a ThinkPad because I hear good things about them but to get a new one for the same price meant settling with much lower specs. At least now I'll have a decent CPU and more RAM than I'll be needing any time soon.

Since you mention anxiety for the condition of the laptop, I had a frightening experience when I received my T60.

That wouldn't have been a nice surprise for you. I've never bought a used laptop before, which is why I'm a little anxious about the condition of it, but I checked out this eBay sellers feedback before making my decision. They were selling a few of these laptops and some buyers had already left feedback on them, stating they were in good condition, so that put my mind at ease a little. Also, they're received 3154 positive feedback in the last 12 months and only 5 negative. They seem like they'll be reliable enough. From what I gather, the laptops are just ex-business laptops that they've refurbished (not sure what that involves) and are getting rid of. I'm assuming refurbished just means they'll have wiped the hard drive and done a clean install of Windows.

On the plus side, it had the 1400x1050 Flexview monitor and in great condition too, and everything with the laptop worked fine. There are about two hundred scratches on the surface of the lid, but I don't mind. It also smells better than the T61p I gave to my father.

Yea, that monitor does sound pretty nice. Cosmetic damage doesn't really bother me too much but obviously the less of it, the better. The T420 that I ordered does state that it may come with "signs of use and the odd scratch". Hopefully it's nothing too noticeable but cosmetic damage really isn't a big deal.

At 2/15/13 07:46 AM, Zanthas wrote: Honestly, any distro can teach you more about Linux and GNU.

I'm not too fussy about what distro I use, I just thought going for something minimal like Arch might make me appreciate what's going on more. I'd like to get to the point where I can actually contribute too or develop some of my own software for a distro. I'm in my last year of a computer science degree but I don't contribute to any open source projects and I'd like to get into it. I feel like I'm a reasonably competent programmer, although far from being the best, but contributing to projects like that still feels a little above my skill level. I feel like I could potentially learn a lot if I were to try and get involved with that.

This is my current Flux setup.

Pretty nice looking set up you have there. Can't say I usually go to the effort of having nice coloured output in terminals and I've never made use of pixel art, but that does look pretty sweet.

Yeah it does. Plus Thinkpads tend to be high quality laptops. You made a good choice.

It has been marked as dispatched using 24 hour express delivery, but since it's the weekend I doubt it will arrive until Monday. I've never actually used a ThinkPad before but I friend of mine had one and they did look like nice laptops.


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Response to Linux Users Club 2013-02-15 09:44:25 Reply

I understand now. If you work with Opengl and your hardware simply can't handle it, there's not much else to do. I just feel that otherwise, you gain little from upgrading your hardware when you're running gnulinux or BSD as opposed to Windows.

I'm confident your laptop will arrive in a satisfactory condition. I bought my T60 from a national classified advertisements website that doesn't support feedback or anything else of the kind. It just had a single picture and a crude list of the specifications with no comments.


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Response to Linux Users Club 2013-02-15 17:32:17 Reply

At 2/15/13 09:24 AM, Dean wrote:
At 2/15/13 07:46 AM, Zanthas wrote: Honestly, any distro can teach you more about Linux and GNU.
I'm not too fussy about what distro I use, I just thought going for something minimal like Arch might make me appreciate what's going on more. I'd like to get to the point where I can actually contribute too or develop some of my own software for a distro. I'm in my last year of a computer science degree but I don't contribute to any open source projects and I'd like to get into it. I feel like I'm a reasonably competent programmer, although far from being the best, but contributing to projects like that still feels a little above my skill level. I feel like I could potentially learn a lot if I were to try and get involved with that.

If Arch is seemed to be unfamiliar to you, try out Debian Squeeze. There are several big open source communities that are quite fun to dive in such as Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Mozilla, Zimbra, Debian and Fedora. You don't really have to start big, several ways to involve in projects is to volunteer to find/fix bugs and add/remove ideas. Check out your university's clubs or local software dev community, perhaps they have some kickass project going on. I get myself in open source projects by doing security work such as bug checking and even patching, in Drupal and Mozilla.

This is my current Flux setup.
Pretty nice looking set up you have there. Can't say I usually go to the effort of having nice coloured output in terminals and I've never made use of pixel art, but that does look pretty sweet.

That's a nice Flux setup. I use Compiz, and previously was Enlightenment. Zanthas you have really sweet skills in customization.

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Response to Linux Users Club 2013-02-16 02:02:03 Reply

I am very curious about running Linux but I have an ever looming question, is performance sacrificed in any way?

I hear you have control over how much Linux takes up on your HDD, hard drive space isn't an issue, I wanna know if RAM or processing power will be cut to a loss.
Im going to be honest, I've always been curious, but as of now the only reason im seriously considering Linux, is because i'll get a TF2 hat if I install it.

SO THEN, what are the benefits? What happens to all my programs when I boot Linux?
One of the main turns off's I have is I cant use 90% of the programs on my computer while Linux is booted, but I am curious about this 'ap store' I hear about...


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Response to Linux Users Club 2013-02-16 05:25:56 Reply

At 2/16/13 02:02 AM, sweet21 wrote: I am very curious about running Linux but I have an ever looming question, is performance sacrificed in any way?

In comparison to what? Windows I assume. It will depend entierly on which distribution you use and whether or not you're using a fancy GUI that has lots of bells and whistles.

I hear you have control over how much Linux takes up on your HDD, hard drive space isn't an issue, I wanna know if RAM or processing power will be cut to a loss.

Control over the HDD space is probably just referring to the control you have over which packages are installed. You could have a very lightweight distribution that uses very little HDD space or you could have a distro that come bundled with all kinds of software, which is obviously going to take up more HDD space. You're free to add or remove packages as you please though.

As for RAM, what's the point in having RAM if it's not being used? But for example, I'm running Linux Mint 13 right now on a Dual core CPU @ 2.5GHz with 2GB RAM. As of right now CPU usage is at about 5% and about 730MB of my RAM is being used. RAM usage shouldn't be alarm though, even if it's using more. The whole point of having RAM is to speed up the time it takes for data to get to the CPU. Some systems might use as much RAM as they can but then clear it out for programs requesting memory space if they have a higher priority. If I user starts up a program, the OS will probably free up RAM by clearing out some of the data that is only being stored there for convenience. I think that's how it could work anyway.

But basically, none of the Linux distros I've used have been CPU intensive or RAM hogs. Since they can be as lightweight as you want them to be, they're probably less resource hungry than Windows. Unless of course you go all out with a really fancy GUI. That'll take up more system resources.

Im going to be honest, I've always been curious, but as of now the only reason im seriously considering Linux, is because i'll get a TF2 hat if I install it.

If your sole reason for switching to Linux is to get a TF2 hat, I wouldn't bother. Linux still isn't really a gaming platform to the extent Windows is. Been a few weeks since I checked but Valve didn't have many games that ran under Linux.

SO THEN, what are the benefits? What happens to all my programs when I boot Linux?

I'm confused by the question. I assume you'll be dual booting Windows and a Linux distro? If that's the case, when you boot up in Linux, you basically don't have access to any of the Windows stuff. Likewise, if you boot up in Windows, you'd have no access to the Linux stuff. Your hard drive basically gets split into two parts and you can imagine them as two separate hard drives.

One of the main turns off's I have is I cant use 90% of the programs on my computer while Linux is booted, but I am curious about this 'ap store' I hear about...

You can't run Windows software on a Linux machine but there are some ways around that. You can use something called Wine which (although it isn't an emulator) you can think of as an emulator for running Windows software. I can't say I've used it much but when I have used it, it seemed to work fine. Rather than using Wine though, you're better off looking for Linux alternatives of the software you need. In a lot of cases there will be a Linux version of the software you're looking for.

As for the "app store" I assume you'll be referring to the likes of the Ubuntu Software Centre. Basically it's just an easy way for you to install software. You can search for things and then it's usually a 1 click install. It can also be used to remove software if you no longer want it. In the case of the Ubuntu Software Centre, they do list some software that you'll have to pay for but there are other Linux distributions that take quite a strong stance on having only free software.

Linux usually sounds scary to people who've never used it before but if you do a little reading up you'll see it doesn't have to be complicated any more. There are some really user friendly distros out there, Ubuntu probably being the most famous. You can always just run a distro from a Live CD to get a feel for it.


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Response to Linux Users Club 2013-02-16 12:55:26 Reply

At 2/16/13 05:25 AM, Dean wrote:
In comparison to what? Windows I assume. It will depend entierly on which distribution you use and whether or not you're using a fancy GUI that has lots of bells and whistles.

In comparison to Windows 7. And it was more a question of 'When I boot windows back up will it still run just as fine as it did before?'

If your sole reason for switching to Linux is to get a TF2 hat, I wouldn't bother. Linux still isn't really a gaming platform to the extent Windows is. Been a few weeks since I checked but Valve didn't have many games that ran under Linux.

Actually if you go to valve right now they are having a Linux games sale, all Linux games are on sale but the main attraction for alot of people is that TF2 can run Linux, and if you run TF2 on Linux before the first of next month you get a complementary item exclusive to Linux users. You can only get the item prior, after the first nobody can get them anymore.


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Response to Linux Users Club 2013-02-16 14:34:30 Reply

At 2/16/13 12:55 PM, sweet21 wrote: In comparison to Windows 7. And it was more a question of 'When I boot windows back up will it still run just as fine as it did before?'

Yes, it will be exactly like you left it. Just make sure you don't overwrite any of your files when installing Ubuntu. You'll need some additional space on your harddrive and unless you have an unused partition or harddisk space, you're gonna have to resize one or more of your existing partitions to make space for a new partition which you'll install Ubuntu on.

To clarify, Windows won't suffer performance loss in any way. Ubuntu and Windows are separate from each other and won't directly affect each other in any way.

The only bad thing about Ubuntu is that it didn't come pre-installed with your computer. Instaling an operating system requires some additional knowledge, and when you're installing 2 different operating systems for a dual-boot configuration, you're gonna have to know a little about partitions.

Also, the Windows bootloader doesn't support multiple operating systems, but since you're installing Ubuntu on a computer with Windows already installed, this won't be a problem. After installing Ubuntu, upon turning on your system you will be presented with a choice to boot into either your Windows or Ubuntu installation.

Actually if you go to valve right now they are having a Linux games sale, all Linux games are on sale but the main attraction for alot of people is that TF2 can run Linux, and if you run TF2 on Linux before the first of next month you get a complementary item exclusive to Linux users. You can only get the item prior, after the first nobody can get them anymore.

I've also noticed that. Sadly, it seems a great deal of them just install Ubuntu, get the hat, delete Ubuntu, and switch back to Windows. It's obviously gonna take some effort on the users part to adapt to a slightly different workflow that is present in an unfamiliar operating system.


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Response to Linux Users Club 2013-02-16 16:00:23 Reply

Linux gensokyo 3.7.0-7-generic #15-Ubuntu SMP Sat Dec 15 14:13:08 UTC 2012 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux

DISTRIB_ID=Ubuntu
DISTRIB_RELEASE=13.04
DISTRIB_CODENAME=raring
DISTRIB_DESCRIPTION="Ubuntu Raring Ringtail (development branch)"


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Response to Linux Users Club 2013-02-16 16:09:03 Reply

Btw, I use Gnome-Shell.

Can't stand Unity and tiling WMs.


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Response to Linux Users Club 2013-02-17 07:29:03 Reply

At 2/16/13 02:34 PM, KevinHR wrote: Sadly, it seems a great deal of them just install Ubuntu, get the hat, delete Ubuntu, and switch back to Windows.

Yea, it's a shame and I also find it a little odd that people would go to such bother for an in-game item that's probably of no real use. Is that one item really worth installing a new operating system to get? Seems like way too much hassle to me.

I do like that Valve are making the effort to get people to try out Ubuntu. I'm not one of these hardcore Windows haters or anything, but it is nice to see people become more willing to try alternatives. I prefer the idea of operating systems being developed by a community rather than a company. I also like operating systems that cost me nothing :)

At 2/16/13 04:09 PM, LLStarks wrote: Can't stand Unity and tiling WMs.

Unity was the reason I ended up changing from Ubuntu. I didn't have to change to another distro but I wanted to try others out and settled on Mint. I rather like Cinnamon. I like having menus to scroll through as oppose to the route Unity seemed to take where you just text-search for what you want. Maybe I'm just too old fashioned and reluctant to change.

Can't say I'm a fan of tiled window managers either but I can see why people might like them and I can see where they'd be useful. When I'm programming there are often times that I try to manually tile windows so that I can see various things at one, so in that case a tiled windows manager would be nice.


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Response to Linux Users Club 2013-02-18 04:18:10 Reply

At 2/15/13 09:24 AM, Dean wrote: I'm not too fussy about what distro I use, I just thought going for something minimal like Arch might make me appreciate what's going on more. I'd like to get to the point where I can actually contribute too or develop some of my own software for a distro. I'm in my last year of a computer science degree but I don't contribute to any open source projects and I'd like to get into it. I feel like I'm a reasonably competent programmer, although far from being the best, but contributing to projects like that still feels a little above my skill level. I feel like I could potentially learn a lot if I were to try and get involved with that.

Try distro hopping. Linux distros tend to be very similar except for the package managers and the packages. Although that in itself is kinda of a big difference. And yeah getting involved in FOSS projects is great. I love that it's a awesome way to give back to the community.

Pretty nice looking set up you have there. Can't say I usually go to the effort of having nice coloured output in terminals and I've never made use of pixel art, but that does look pretty sweet.

Thanks man, I try.


It has been marked as dispatched using 24 hour express delivery, but since it's the weekend I doubt it will arrive until Monday. I've never actually used a ThinkPad before but I friend of mine had one and they did look like nice laptops.

Did you get it yet?

At 2/15/13 05:32 PM, Elitistinen wrote: That's a nice Flux setup. I use Compiz, and previously was Enlightenment. Zanthas you have really sweet skills in customization.

I love E17. It's really pretty. I use it sometimes. Compiz is great too.
And thanks man, I appreciate the compliment.

In other news Sabayon 11 (my second favourite distro) is out.

Get it while its hot!

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Response to Linux Users Club 2013-02-18 04:33:45 Reply

At 2/16/13 04:00 PM, LLStarks wrote: Linux gensokyo 3.7.0-7-generic #15-Ubuntu SMP Sat Dec 15 14:13:08 UTC 2012 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux

DISTRIB_ID=Ubuntu
DISTRIB_RELEASE=13.04
DISTRIB_CODENAME=raring
DISTRIB_DESCRIPTION="Ubuntu Raring Ringtail (development branch)"

Gensokyo, eh?

Which Touhou is your favourite?

At 2/16/13 04:09 PM, LLStarks wrote: Btw, I use Gnome-Shell.

Can't stand Unity and tiling WMs.

Not a fan of Unity, and I don't like Tiling WMs either. Although I've seen so pretty desktops using them.


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Response to Linux Users Club 2013-02-18 06:49:15 Reply

At 2/18/13 04:18 AM, Zanthas wrote: Did you get it yet?

Not yet although the delivery companies tracking service has it listed as being "Out for delivery". Their depot is about an hour away in Edinburgh so I'm assuming it'll arrive mid-afternoon, so a few hours away.

As pleased as I am to hopefully be receiving it today it's also a little annoying because I have work to do but who can resist the urge to play around on a new laptop? Also eagerly awaiting to find out what kind of condition it's in.


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Response to Linux Users Club 2013-02-18 10:11:20 Reply

Well, the ThinkPad arrived and it's in pretty decent condition. I could only see a few little things that I could be picky about. On the rear of the laptop there's a USB port that has had a little piece of the surrounding plastic chipped off but it's nothing terrible and not all that obvious. I didn't even notice at first glance. The only other thing that I've found was that there's a missing lock mechanism on the underside of the laptop that's used to lock the disc drive in. I'd have preferred if that was still there but the switch that's used to remove the disc drive requires some pressure so it seems unlikely that it'll accidentally be pressed.

Other than that there's nothing wrong with it really aside from a couple of minor scratches on the lid that are only noticable if you go looking for them. But yea, overall I'm very impressed with the condition of this laptop considering the price I paid for it.

Windows 7 boots and shuts down a lot faster than I'm used to as well. Unsure if that's to do with the hardware or because Lenovo claim that they've sped up the process themselves. The ThinkPad trackball thing feels strange to use at first but I'm getting the hang of it. I can see myself preferring this over the trackpad.

I'm not going to bother installing a Linux distro on this just yet. I think I'll get everything I need set up on Windows first since I pretty much have to use Windows for some coursework that I'll be doing soon. Plus I don't feel like I have the time to be faffing about with another new OS either because really I've got so much work that I should be doing right now.

Overall though I'm really impressed with this right now. I'll just have to use it for a little while to adjust to Windows (haven't really used Windows since XP) and make sure there isn't anything wrong with this laptop that I've missed at first glance.


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