Be a Supporter!

Newgrounds Horticultural Society.

  • 6,167 Views
  • 53 Replies
New Topic Respond to this Topic
Sheizenhammer
Sheizenhammer
  • Member since: Dec. 31, 2008
  • Offline.
Forum Stats
Member
Level 32
Blank Slate
Newgrounds Horticultural Society. Feb. 21st, 2010 @ 08:49 PM Reply

This is a club for anyone and everyone who is interested in plants, gardening, botany, or anything else involving the discussion of horticulture.

Feel free to share your experiences, tips / tricks, or photographs of your latest achievements in the garden / houseplant department. Alternatively, if you have a plant that you want to identify, or you're having problems keeping things alive and healthy (or any other relevant question about plant care), don't hesitate to ask about it in here. Basically, if you want to talk about plants, this is the place for you. Simple as that. ^__^

This club is open to everyone, and there is no real memberlist to speak of. I may keep a 'helpers list' to give the people who regularly answer questions in here some recognition for their efforts, but it's by no means an exclusive club in any respect.

It does, however, need some rules (don't worry; they're not hard to follow):
----------------------------
1. Absolutely no discussion about the procurement and / or cultivation of illegal plants! Asking about how to grow anything that produces a banned or controlled substance is not only a really good way of getting BBS banned (read: "discussing illegal activities"), but may well end up with your local government placing a drugs intelligence marker on your IP address. If you find yourself questioning the legality of what you're posting, you probably shouldn't be posting it.

2. To that effect, if it becomes obvious someone is only posting here to look for 'legal' highs, do not respond to it. That's what the stoner's club is for.

3. Be civil in your arguments. While gardening isn't known for causing flame-wars, it is full of entirely subjective opinions, and people will inevitably disagree on things like what looks best and how to do certain things in given situations. You can debate things all you like, but if it turns into stupid name-calling sessions, please do everyone a favour and discontinue it.

4. Pictures (especially photo's of your own plants) are actively encouraged, but remember: picture spam is still picture spam. If you're going to post a picture, make sure it has at least some relevance to what your post is about.

5. Obviously, all of the BBS rules apply here, just as they would everywhere else on the forums. If mods tell you to quit doing something, listen to them.
----------------------------

And above all, have fun. That's what having awesome plants was all about in the first place. ;)

And I couldn't for the life of me find any existing clubs dealing with plants, but if there is one, I apologise in advance.

Newgrounds Horticultural Society.

SilentCobra
SilentCobra
  • Member since: Oct. 25, 2006
  • Offline.
Forum Stats
Member
Level 32
Gamer
Response to Newgrounds Horticultural Society. Mar. 28th, 2010 @ 09:30 PM Reply

Hey, this sounds like fun!

I had a garden going last year and the year before. The first time was with some tomato plants, and my dad and I put them in too early and a good few I lost to the last couple weeks of frost. If it wasn't frost, it was deer eating them down to the stems! I had it open to the wildlife and just last year my dad and I put up a chicken wire fence then put chain-link fencing around the chicken wire.

Last year I had leaf lettuce, green bell peppers, tomatoes, I tried to grow some white potatoes which didn't turn out. I also had some yellow squash as well, some carrots which didn't pan out and in the summer I had sweet yellow corn. I didn't weed my garden as often as I should have and it got run over with weeds.

Ah well, 'tis a new growing season upon us, LET'S TRY AGAIN MAN!


Sig by Byte | Steam ID -- SilentCobra | PS3 Gamer Tag -- SlntCobra1
Writers Lounge | EGB | PS3

BBS Signature
AJ
AJ
  • Member since: Apr. 14, 2003
  • Offline.
Forum Stats
Member
Level 17
Movie Buff
Response to Newgrounds Horticultural Society. Mar. 28th, 2010 @ 09:55 PM Reply

Yes hi! I was interested in learning how to grow things in hydroponics... Like um..... Tomatoes. And um... Other tomatoes.. Whatever. :p I kid I kid. I took a bunch of horticulture classes in high school and I really enjoyed them, but it's not something that is a big part of my life anymore. All the same, expect me to randomly pop in here now and again if the current subject matter intrigues me, assuming this club takes off.

Gunner-D
Gunner-D
  • Member since: Feb. 25, 2001
  • Offline.
Forum Stats
Member
Level 11
Blank Slate
Response to Newgrounds Horticultural Society. Mar. 29th, 2010 @ 12:10 AM Reply

Tis the season, spring is upon us and the last frost is behind us in Massachusetts.

I've been planning a 10X10 yard garden in my backyard for some time now. Just recently I have been clearing the brush from the surrounding area. Last year there was an incredible ice storm up here in New England and many tree have been broken and have died. Ax work is a plenty, although I would love to own a chainsaw.

Does anyone have good advice about eliminating parasitic roots like bittersweet (although that may be a regional name)? It is a vine that grows in full force throughout the spring, summer, and tangles into everything, crippling trees, and creating an eyesore. I heard if I don't destroy all of its roots, it will always come back. I may eliminate it all when I stir up the soil later this week, but that stuff is the worst pest there is.

Besides weeds, there are animals that need containment as well. There are families and families of rabbits that live around the pond directly in back of my house, which attract foxes and other wildlife to the area, like bugs. If anyone has so good advice about proper pest management and fence construction that would be helpful too.

And as for natural fertilizers, I want to know the best about them.

So far in my cleanup I have found an old shopping cart, metal kitchen shelving, 20 feet of heavy duty 8" firehose, and plywood, and thirty feet of chicken wire. The only one I would use is the firehose because it breaks in four sections and I can use it for irrigation.

Lets not forget about the bonfires.

Awesome, awesome, awesome idea. Triple Awesome idea for a club.

Sheizenhammer
Sheizenhammer
  • Member since: Dec. 31, 2008
  • Offline.
Forum Stats
Member
Level 32
Blank Slate
Response to Newgrounds Horticultural Society. Mar. 29th, 2010 @ 11:02 AM Reply

Well, I'll be damned. People actually give a shit about this. WOO! ^__^

At 3/28/10 09:55 PM, michelinman wrote: Yes hi! I was interested in learning how to grow things in hydroponics... Like um..... Tomatoes. And um... Other tomatoes.. Whatever.

Hydroponics is definitely something I want to try when I've got the money and time / space to do it. I love the idea of not having to go out in the damn rain to take care of plants anymore! XD

At 3/28/10 09:30 PM, SlntCobra1 wrote: Ah well, 'tis a new growing season upon us, LET'S TRY AGAIN MAN!

Heheh, that's the spirit!
I wish I had enough space around here for veggies. All I've got's a medium-sized garden to play with. Still, it's good for flowers and other pointless shit. :P

At 3/29/10 12:10 AM, Gunner-D wrote: Does anyone have good advice about eliminating parasitic roots like bittersweet (although that may be a regional name)?

Hmm. Best thing I've heard of is cutting the stems a couple of inches above ground level, and then immediately coating the cut area of the stump in a concentrated glyphosate / triclophyr paste. You can get pastes of these from most large garden / agricultural stores.

Failing that (if you're unlucky enough to have resistant weeds in your garden), a CAREFUL application of fire can actually work.
It sounds insane to try and burn a plant stuck onto another, more desired plant, but the idea is not to burn it outright, but to dry it out. Repeatedly drying out the leaves with a blowtorch or other small flame will overwork the root system to the point of it collapsing (especially if you combine it with added weedkiller immediately after drying it out >:D).

For both methods, waiting for dry weather is a good idea (you don't want glyphosate paste being washed into the soil!).

If neither of the above work, there are alternatives such as DCMU (aka 'diuron'), but most of the really stong weedkillers like that are actually dangerous to handle, and can kill a lot more than you wanted them to, so it's a bit of a toss-up between having trees ruined by weeds, or risking having them ruined by weedkiller overkill.

Besides weeds, there are animals that need containment as well. There are families and families of rabbits that live around the pond directly in back of my house, which attract foxes and other wildlife to the area, like bugs. If anyone has so good advice about proper pest management and fence construction that would be helpful too.

The best kind of fence IMO is a chicken-wire one, that's been dug into the ground. If you want to keep rabbits out, you need to dig the fence in at least a couple of feet (if not more) to stop them burrowing underneath it. If you use a solid wood fence for that, it'll not only be susceptible to rabbits chewing through it, but you'll also block out earthworms and other helpful animals from coming in. Using a chicken wire fence (or anything metal with holes in it, really) will allow the helpful creatures through, while keeping out the larger, destructive ones.

As for bugs, it depends how much of a nuisance they're being. Most plants can tolerate a few bugs without really suffering, but if you're really being overrun by insects it's best to invest in counter-measures such as insecticides, if not more eco-friendly alternatives like spiders / ladybirds (yes, you CAN buy them, if not from as many places as insecticedes though).

And as for natural fertilizers, I want to know the best about them.

This depends on what exactly you're growing, but I've often found that most plants have little real need for fertilisers if the soil is good enough to begin with. Old-fashioned compost usually has enough food in it for months if not years if used outside (where it will continue to rot down and release nutrients for ages). It's as good as any natural (and most artificial) fertilisers, and it's literally dirt cheap too. :P

So far in my cleanup I have found an old shopping cart, metal kitchen shelving, 20 feet of heavy duty 8" firehose, and plywood, and thirty feet of chicken wire. The only one I would use is the firehose because it breaks in four sections and I can use it for irrigation.

I'd probably find some use for the shelving (if it's not hopelessly mangled or disease-riddes etc.), like if you've got an indoor work area for gardening chores: greenhouse, shed, etc. That is, of course, if you don't have enough shelf space already. :)

Awesome, awesome, awesome idea. Triple Awesome idea for a club.

Speaking of awesome: PICTURE TIME! :D
These are some Coleus plants I'm growing for the garden later this year. They're just for show, but the neat thing about these guys is that you can be the laziest, most incompetent gardener ever, and still get lots of added colour to wherever you put them. Their leaves are the colourful part, not the flowers, so you don't actually have to get them to flower to get the most out of them. I mean, look at these: they're only 2 weeks old and they've got more colour than most of my plants I've had for years right now.

Newgrounds Horticultural Society.

SilentCobra
SilentCobra
  • Member since: Oct. 25, 2006
  • Offline.
Forum Stats
Member
Level 32
Gamer
Response to Newgrounds Horticultural Society. Mar. 29th, 2010 @ 01:29 PM Reply

Speaking of natural fertilizer, my mom has a horse and I have access to plenty, and I mean plenty of all natural fertilizer. Horse manure, cow pies, etc. is excellent for gardening.

Another good fertilizer, if you don't have readily available animal manure, is anything by MiracleGro, they're another reliable fertilizer company.

That's all I got to say for now. Let's keep this corn train a-rollin'!

u c wut I did thar?

Sig by Byte | Steam ID -- SilentCobra | PS3 Gamer Tag -- SlntCobra1
Writers Lounge | EGB | PS3

BBS Signature
Sheizenhammer
Sheizenhammer
  • Member since: Dec. 31, 2008
  • Offline.
Forum Stats
Member
Level 32
Blank Slate
Response to Newgrounds Horticultural Society. Mar. 29th, 2010 @ 09:57 PM Reply

At 3/29/10 01:29 PM, SlntCobra1 wrote: Speaking of natural fertilizer, my mom has a horse and I have access to plenty, and I mean plenty of all natural fertilizer. Horse manure, cow pies, etc. is excellent for gardening.

Heheh; can't get more natural than that I guess. Although, one thing about manure is that you have to dig it into the soil a few months prior to planting anything to get the most out of it. It needs time to rot down and change the waste proteins / ammonia etc. into nitrates (the main useful bit of the manure), as well as most of the other chemicals a plant needs to grow properly.

Another good fertilizer, if you don't have readily available animal manure, is anything by MiracleGro, they're another reliable fertilizer company.

Yeah, but they're hardly what you'd call 'natural'. Most of their fertilisers are made in Haber process reactors from Nitrogen gas and oxygen.
...Then again, plants themselves, somewhat ironically, have no concept of 'natural', and won't really care as long as the fertiliser (natural or not) is applied in the right measure.

That's all I got to say for now. Let's keep this corn train a-rollin'!

I will not post a silly train pic.... I will NOT break my own damn picture spam rule on the first fucking page...!!!

CagedSilhouette
CagedSilhouette
  • Member since: Jul. 16, 2005
  • Offline.
Forum Stats
Member
Level 28
Musician
Response to Newgrounds Horticultural Society. Mar. 29th, 2010 @ 10:14 PM Reply

Hey, cool! I'm starting a garden this year. I think this is a good idea for a club. So far I've planted 7 cabbages, 3 strawberry roots, and some pansies. I planted a basil plant too, but a cold front came in and seemed to almost kill it. :( Hopefully I can save it though, I've had good luck with plants in the past.

I'm planning on planting some onions, some spinach, some morning glories, and maybe get a few cuttings off of some of the wild plants that grow out here[if they're interesting enough].

My family also has a few horses and cows out here, so I'll probably be making some natural fertalizer too.

Anyway, I'll probably post some pics once my strawberries get to growing. My cabbage got mauled by our chickens one day when we let them out, but they're recovering surprisingly well. Maybe I'll post some pics of that and the pansies. Maybe the basil too, if anyone has any tips on how I could possibly save it[I was looking forward to growing my own spice(s)].


BBS Signature
SilentCobra
SilentCobra
  • Member since: Oct. 25, 2006
  • Offline.
Forum Stats
Member
Level 32
Gamer
Response to Newgrounds Horticultural Society. Mar. 30th, 2010 @ 02:02 PM Reply

At 3/29/10 09:57 PM, Sheizenhammer wrote:
At 3/29/10 01:29 PM, SlntCobra1 wrote: Speaking of natural fertilizer, my mom has a horse and I have access to plenty, and I mean plenty of all natural fertilizer. Horse manure, cow pies, etc. is excellent for gardening.
It needs time to rot down and change the waste proteins / ammonia etc. into nitrates (the main useful bit of the manure), as well as most of the other chemicals a plant needs to grow properly.

Or unless you've had the horse around for something like almost 3 years. Then there is sure to be plenty of rotted down manure over that amount of time. That and I don't even put it down that far into the soil. I merely mix it up with the soil I already have. My house is surrounded by very fertile soil.


Sig by Byte | Steam ID -- SilentCobra | PS3 Gamer Tag -- SlntCobra1
Writers Lounge | EGB | PS3

BBS Signature
Gunner-D
Gunner-D
  • Member since: Feb. 25, 2001
  • Offline.
Forum Stats
Member
Level 11
Blank Slate
Response to Newgrounds Horticultural Society. Mar. 30th, 2010 @ 10:36 PM Reply

Too much rain in Massachusetts. Not enough time to work.

Thanks for the advice about building my fence underground. I got chickenwire and I'm going to put it a 18 inches below the soil to keep the rabbits out.

Sheizenhammer
Sheizenhammer
  • Member since: Dec. 31, 2008
  • Offline.
Forum Stats
Member
Level 32
Blank Slate
Response to Newgrounds Horticultural Society. Mar. 31st, 2010 @ 05:54 PM Reply

At 3/29/10 10:14 PM, CagedSilhouette wrote: I'm planning on planting some onions, some spinach, some morning glories, and maybe get a few cuttings off of some of the wild plants that grow out here[if they're interesting enough].

That's the one thing I really love about gardening: if you get it right, you can do it for practically nothing. Hell, I even have a book called 'Growing plants for free'. It's awesome.

Anyway, I'll probably post some pics once my strawberries get to growing. My cabbage got mauled by our chickens one day when we let them out, but they're recovering surprisingly well. Maybe I'll post some pics of that and the pansies. Maybe the basil too, if anyone has any tips on how I could possibly save it[I was looking forward to growing my own spice(s)].

Cool, I'd love to see some pics in here. And as for the basil, I'm no expert on herbs, but they seem to be better suited to indoor environments (especially greenhouses), for exactly the reason you've pointed out here. The cultivated varieties just aren't that robust, I'm afraid, and will need a little extra looking after if you want the most out of them.

At 3/30/10 02:02 PM, SlntCobra1 wrote: Or unless you've had the horse around for something like almost 3 years. Then there is sure to be plenty of rotted down manure over that amount of time. That and I don't even put it down that far into the soil. I merely mix it up with the soil I already have. My house is surrounded by very fertile soil.

Yeah that's true. While the fresh manure won't be of much use immediately, if you've been doing it for years I can imagine being able to grow tons of stuff around where you are.

At 3/30/10 10:36 PM, Gunner-D wrote: Too much rain in Massachusetts. Not enough time to work.

A-fucking-men to that!
I live in England, and it's barely stopped raining for so much as one day in the last 9 months. Seriously, we don't have seasons here, we just have different temperatures throughout the year. The rain just never stops.

God, I love my greenhouse. It's often the only way I can get anything done around here.

Thanks for the advice about building my fence underground. I got chickenwire and I'm going to put it a 18 inches below the soil to keep the rabbits out.

Umm, I'd dig it in deeper than that if I were you. I'm pretty sure rabbit burrows can go down twice as far as that, and if you've got a big rabbit population to think about, the chances of one of them making a burrow that deep are pretty high.

On a completely random note, I couldn't help but laugh at the current front page game:

I wonder if someone saw this thread and thought "Hey, I know...". :P

Makakaov
Makakaov
  • Member since: Jun. 23, 2009
  • Offline.
Forum Stats
Member
Level 22
Blank Slate
Response to Newgrounds Horticultural Society. Jun. 9th, 2010 @ 11:09 AM Reply

I love plants, and gardening.

It's sooo FABULOUS!

abbamysta
abbamysta
  • Member since: Dec. 20, 2008
  • Offline.
Forum Stats
Member
Level 05
Blank Slate
Response to Newgrounds Horticultural Society. Jun. 18th, 2010 @ 04:17 PM Reply

i have an aorange tree !
my mom bet me the money it cost to buy as a little sapling that it wouldnt survive a week :)
ive had it like 2 months and its hanging in ... just , all the leafs keep falling off and its dying ( mourn my plant !) and i even looked up how to make sure it gets enough light and not too mutch and things ... but its dying ,
on a good note , i have some herbs assweel . you know your getting pictures posted ...

abbamysta
abbamysta
  • Member since: Dec. 20, 2008
  • Offline.
Forum Stats
Member
Level 05
Blank Slate
Response to Newgrounds Horticultural Society. Jun. 18th, 2010 @ 04:40 PM Reply

picturama !

its mah tree !

Newgrounds Horticultural Society.

Sheizenhammer
Sheizenhammer
  • Member since: Dec. 31, 2008
  • Offline.
Forum Stats
Member
Level 32
Blank Slate
Response to Newgrounds Horticultural Society. Jun. 18th, 2010 @ 05:10 PM Reply

At 6/9/10 11:09 AM, Makakaov wrote: I love plants, and gardening.

It's sooo FABULOUS!

<3 :D

At 6/18/10 04:17 PM, abbamysta wrote: i have an aorange tree !
my mom bet me the money it cost to buy as a little sapling that it wouldnt survive a week :)
ive had it like 2 months and its hanging in ... just , all the leafs keep falling off and its dying ( mourn my plant !) and i even looked up how to make sure it gets enough light and not too mutch and things ... but its dying ,

Hahaha, that's a pretty good bet you've got there!
It looks fine from the picture you posted, but if leaves keep falling off for no apparent reason it could be missing (or getting too much of) something it needs. The last plant I had that kept shedding its leaves turned out to be in need of more light and I can see that your orange tree (if that's where you keep it all the time) is behind a blind.

Then again, it can also be due to too much or too little nutrients / water in the soil. What colour do the leaves go before they fall off? If they go yellow, red or other weird colours your tree might benefit from a little more food (or less water: Too much water can kill citrus trees pretty quickly) in the soil. If they're just plain falling off without going any particular colour it's more likely to be a lack of light causing it.

I'm no expert, but a few minutes of Googling found a few things that might be useful to you.

on a good note , i have some herbs assweel . you know your getting pictures posted ...

WOO! It's nice to see people interested in growing useful things. Most of my plants are just for show, since hardly anything that fruits can grow around here.
... Well, except strawberries. I'd go take a picture of the monster strawberry plant I have, but it's too damn dark right now. Oh well.

abbamysta
abbamysta
  • Member since: Dec. 20, 2008
  • Offline.
Forum Stats
Member
Level 05
Blank Slate
Response to Newgrounds Horticultural Society. Jun. 19th, 2010 @ 04:39 AM Reply

it actually seems to be doing a bit better , it used to stay in the conservatory , but it was cold overnight in there so i moved it to the kitchen recently because its lees of a temperature shift. . so most likely it was light because all the leaves were going slightly orange before they fell off .
i think thr fact that i have miracle gro fertilizer on hand to use every so often is helping it though :)

... i must see the monster strawbery plant !

Tony-DarkGrave
Tony-DarkGrave
  • Member since: Jul. 15, 2006
  • Offline.
Forum Stats
Supporter
Level 43
Programmer
Response to Newgrounds Horticultural Society. Jun. 19th, 2010 @ 04:55 AM Reply

when I lived with my family I loved gardening can I join?

Sheizenhammer
Sheizenhammer
  • Member since: Dec. 31, 2008
  • Offline.
Forum Stats
Member
Level 32
Blank Slate
Response to Newgrounds Horticultural Society. Jun. 19th, 2010 @ 03:58 PM Reply

At 6/19/10 04:55 AM, Tony-DarkGrave wrote: when I lived with my family I loved gardening can I join?

Sure, although there's no need to 'join' here. There's no memberlist, so if you want to use this thread, by all means go ahead. Hope to see you around! :)

At 6/19/10 04:39 AM, abbamysta wrote: it actually seems to be doing a bit better , it used to stay in the conservatory , but it was cold overnight in there so i moved it to the kitchen recently because its lees of a temperature shift. . so most likely it was light because all the leaves were going slightly orange before they fell off .
i think thr fact that i have miracle gro fertilizer on hand to use every so often is helping it though :)

Cool, although if it continues to shed leaves I think you might want to check the roots, as per what some of them links up there say. The other main cause of leaf-shedding, it seems, is root rot brought on by too much water. The roots should be firm and white-ish. If they're not, you might have a problem there.

... i must see the monster strawbery plant !

Okay. It's under a net to keep the damn birds off of the strawberries, but that brick holding the net down should give you some idea of how big it is. Some of them leaves are the size of my hands (and I'm 22 and almost 6 feet tall)!

Newgrounds Horticultural Society.

Ronald-McDonald-LoL
Ronald-McDonald-LoL
  • Member since: Jun. 9, 2006
  • Offline.
Forum Stats
Member
Level 41
Blank Slate
Response to Newgrounds Horticultural Society. Jul. 5th, 2010 @ 12:47 PM Reply

Sorry if this is a huge bump, but I'm interested in joining in on this thread.
Right now, I have a collection of about 50 small trees, most of which are maple or ash. I do have a few oaks and rarer things, such as American chestnut and the ever-unpopular eastern cottonwood.
My largest is a green ash that's about 4 feet tall. It's in a garden, but I'm moving it into the yard next year. Everything else I have is in a pot. 90% of the things I grow will eventually reach tree size.

Here's a picture of my favorite ash, although it's small and old. I keep a lot of details on my userpage blog and I haven't made an entry lately.

Newgrounds Horticultural Society.


Dora Revolution | Descent Club | EGB | Sig by byteslinger. Click for my Twitch channel.

BBS Signature
Sheizenhammer
Sheizenhammer
  • Member since: Dec. 31, 2008
  • Offline.
Forum Stats
Member
Level 32
Blank Slate
Response to Newgrounds Horticultural Society. Jul. 7th, 2010 @ 08:47 AM Reply

At 7/5/10 12:47 PM, Ronald-McDonald-LoL wrote: Sorry if this is a huge bump, but I'm interested in joining in on this thread.

Meh; it's not exactly a fast-moving thread anyway.

Right now, I have a collection of about 50 small trees, most of which are maple or ash.

Ash trees?

ASH TREES!?!?!?!!

....Ahem.
Sorry; ash trees are the bane of my damn garden. Every year I have to spend weeks ripping out seedlings from neighbouring garden trees. The damn things pop up literally everywhere, and if not gotten rid of within like a week or so they get so deeply rooted into where they are it's pretty much impossible to remove them without destroying the area they're in. Grah!

Oh, and also sycamore trees, for the same reason. Just seems like this place makes it really easy for them to grow around here... which is annoying if you don't want a forest for a back yard.

Here's a picture of my favorite ash, although it's small and old. I keep a lot of details on my userpage blog and I haven't made an entry lately.

Small AND old? How the hell did you manage to keep it small? Every damn one around this place ends up 10 feet tall within a year. God, I wish I could stop 'em growing somehow (that doesn't involve copious amounts of poison, fire and / or digging equipment). -__-'

I'll be looking at that blog later on. Nice to see someone else interested in this! :)

Ronald-McDonald-LoL
Ronald-McDonald-LoL
  • Member since: Jun. 9, 2006
  • Offline.
Forum Stats
Member
Level 41
Blank Slate
Response to Newgrounds Horticultural Society. Jul. 7th, 2010 @ 06:51 PM Reply

At 7/7/10 08:47 AM, Sheizenhammer wrote:
Small AND old? How the hell did you manage to keep it small? Every damn one around this place ends up 10 feet tall within a year. God, I wish I could stop 'em growing somehow (that doesn't involve copious amounts of poison, fire and / or digging equipment). -__-'

Oops, I meant the picture was small and old. Sorry for the mistake, I noticed it about 25 seconds after I posted. The tree itself has to be at least 4 years old.

I haven't taken many pictures of the plants lately. It's hard to get pictures since most filesizes are huge and won't fit on NG. I'll post some Photobucket links later on.


Dora Revolution | Descent Club | EGB | Sig by byteslinger. Click for my Twitch channel.

BBS Signature
Ecliptic
Ecliptic
  • Member since: Jun. 24, 2006
  • Offline.
Forum Stats
Member
Level 10
Game Developer
Response to Newgrounds Horticultural Society. Aug. 4th, 2010 @ 07:50 PM Reply

I'm growing some plants in my fish tank... does that count!?

Newgrounds Horticultural Society.


.

Sheizenhammer
Sheizenhammer
  • Member since: Dec. 31, 2008
  • Offline.
Forum Stats
Member
Level 32
Blank Slate
Response to Newgrounds Horticultural Society. Aug. 4th, 2010 @ 09:38 PM Reply

At 8/4/10 07:50 PM, Ecliptic wrote: I'm growing some plants in my fish tank... does that count!?

Hell yes! :D

I've wanted to grow some aquatic plants for ages. Only problem is I don't have a pond, or a fish tank, or anything that could be used to grow...

...Wait a sec. I might be able to make use of a few of these oversized vases I've got lying around here... Hmm...

THANKS!! You've just given me my next random idea for a houseplant. Now all I need is some underwater plants, which won't be hard since there's a damn big aquarium store near here.

Nice fish, by the way. I remember having one of those (I used to have an aquarium too, but I had to get rid of it years ago.)

AnotherAnonymous
AnotherAnonymous
  • Member since: Jun. 29, 2010
  • Offline.
Forum Stats
Member
Level 04
Blank Slate
Response to Newgrounds Horticultural Society. Aug. 4th, 2010 @ 11:33 PM Reply

Yo.
So I have a 100% organic garden, my second year with it. Unfortunately, this year in my opinion was the worst year we had, simply due to the way we planted everything this year. My mom crowds the plants a lot and I can barely squeeze through the rows (I'm 5'4" and 114 pounds) so our tomatoes are dying of (though there is still a good harvest to be had). Second problem would be possible fertilization. We never used any sort of fertilizer (EVER) and this year it just dreadful because of it. We know the different options we have but my mom and I always argues with me about how much to put in (she never reads the directions, which seem confusing to me). Third problem: Ceder Tree Rust. Everywhere on our only two apple trees. I need help on how to stop this ceder rust (removing the ceders is not an option, since we live in the suburbs, and we cannot remove all the ceder trees within a 6 block radius of our house). I'm sorry, I'm on the wrong computer to show you pictures and all, but I like my garden. A lot.

Ronald-McDonald-LoL
Ronald-McDonald-LoL
  • Member since: Jun. 9, 2006
  • Offline.
Forum Stats
Member
Level 41
Blank Slate
Response to Newgrounds Horticultural Society. Aug. 5th, 2010 @ 01:48 PM Reply

I'm starting to get frustrated with the oaks that I have. They're either all suffering from different levels of transplant shock, or are dead. I've got just one (A good-looking bur oak) that actually seems to be healthy.
I have such trouble with nut-bearing trees that it's not even funny; I had ordered 4 American chestnuts and 2 American beech trees last year through the mail, and none of them are still alive.
What's the secret here? I know for a fact that chestnuts should not be potted, but some of the trees didn't even leaf out.
And sugar maples; what am I doing wrong with these? I have just one, and it's tiny. It simply will not grow.
Our garden is very good this year. Except for a few minor incidents involving rabbits, milkweed being blown over by storms, and lots of hot weather, it's all growing very well!
Everything else is either growing normally or exceeding expectations, even the elms. Heck, even the milkweed has returned to our garden!
Here's some of the links I promised. Most of these pictures were taken today, so it's up to date.
Healthy Bur Oak
Milkweed and tomatoes
Check out the Marigolds!
This ash shares a pot with some flowers
snapshot of the trees, check out the elm in the center!My favorite white ash tree
Yet again, more ash.And some more ash....Garden with, you guessed it, another ash.The tiny sugar maple


Dora Revolution | Descent Club | EGB | Sig by byteslinger. Click for my Twitch channel.

BBS Signature
Sheizenhammer
Sheizenhammer
  • Member since: Dec. 31, 2008
  • Offline.
Forum Stats
Member
Level 32
Blank Slate
Response to Newgrounds Horticultural Society. Aug. 6th, 2010 @ 06:05 PM Reply

At 8/4/10 11:33 PM, AnotherAnonymous wrote: Yo.

Hey.

So I have a 100% organic garden, my second year with it. Unfortunately, this year in my opinion was the worst year we had, simply due to the way we planted everything this year. My mom crowds the plants a lot and I can barely squeeze through the rows (I'm 5'4" and 114 pounds) so our tomatoes are dying of (though there is still a good harvest to be had).

Welp, I don't think I need insult anyone's intelligence and tell you what the obvious solution to this is. :P

Second problem would be possible fertilization. We never used any sort of fertilizer (EVER) and this year it just dreadful because of it. We know the different options we have but my mom and I always argues with me about how much to put in (she never reads the directions, which seem confusing to me).

If you're growing fruit and veg, there's not really any kind of upper limit to how much fertilizer you can use. Especially if the soil has already been exhausted (as evident by a lack of yield, I'm guessing). Most fruit and veg plants need a lot more nutrients in the soil than your average flowers and such, simply because they have to spend said nutrients on themselves AND the fruit they make.

If you want to stay true to the whole organic thing, my advice would be to buy some manure at the end of this growing year and dig as much of it into the garden as you can reasonably afford (and can stand working with :P). It'll rot down over the winter and be ready for use again in the spring. You can also buy compressed manure, if you don't want a garden full of cowshit all winter, which isn't anywhere near as unpleasant to work with, but is more expensive. Still considered 'natural' though, since all that's happened to it is compression (it hasn't been chemically altered or anything).

:Third problem: Ceder Tree Rust. Everywhere on our only two apple trees. I need help on how to stop this ceder rust (removing the ceders is not an option, since we live in the suburbs, and we cannot remove all the ceder trees within a 6 block radius of our house).

This... could be a problem. I can find no 'organic' way of getting rid of cedar-apple rust. There are fungicides that treat it, though, so I suppose it's a simple matter of which you value more: That '100% organic' label or the ability to grow apples in any noticeable quantity.
Personally, I'd go for the fungicide, but then again I never was one for 'organic' ways of doing things. IMO, artificial ways of controlling this stuff were invented for a reason (read: 'natural' methods just don't work that well most of the time). Then again, it's your garden, so it's up to you. Do you go for principle or pragmatism?

I'm sorry, I'm on the wrong computer to show you pictures and all, but I like my garden. A lot.

Cool; looking forward to it. :)

At 8/5/10 01:48 PM, Ronald-McDonald-LoL wrote: I'm starting to get frustrated with the oaks that I have. They're either all suffering from different levels of transplant shock, or are dead. I've got just one (A good-looking bur oak) that actually seems to be healthy.

How exactly are you transplanting them? I've transplanted things before (admittedly not trees, but anyway), and I've often found that the less damage there is done to the roots, the better the plant handles being moved. After all, a plant of (almost) any type needs an in-tact root system to live, right?
Best way I've found is to dig out as much soil around the plant as you can without damaging nearby plants, and then gently shaking or manually crumbling (NOT cutting / digging) off the excess soil until you can just see the root tips sticking out of the soil ball you have left on the plant.

Then again, this only works on plants that don't have very deep root systems, so I'm not sure how well it would work with trees. I suppose you could give it a go and see if the results are any better than what's been happening with them, though. It cant get much worse, right?

I have such trouble with nut-bearing trees that it's not even funny; I had ordered 4 American chestnuts and 2 American beech trees last year through the mail, and none of them are still alive.
What's the secret here? I know for a fact that chestnuts should not be potted, but some of the trees didn't even leaf out.

Just out of interest, roughly where do you live? Is it hot, cold, windy, or particularly dry where you are? If the trees you were ordering come from the northern border of the USA, for example, and you're living somewhere near the southern border, it could just be that the trees aren't built to tolerate the climate you're in.

If not, my best guess would be too much / too little water. Too much and the nuts rot before they get a chance to properly sprout; too little and... well, the result is the same as with any plant. I can't think of anything else (short of diseases / poisons) that would kill a small tree that quickly.

And sugar maples; what am I doing wrong with these? I have just one, and it's tiny. It simply will not grow.

That looks like something's wrong with it for sure. Have you tried taking the soil mass out of the pot and having a look at the roots? I can see some moss on the soil it's in, and I know moss like that usually grows on damp / wet soil. The roots might be suffering from root rot if the soil is too wet, which would explain the lack of growth (again, no roots = no growth). They should be an off-white colour, and be fairly firm. If they're soft, or a dark colour, you might want to let the pot dry out a little and get yourself some fungicide.

If there's nothing wrong with the roots, it could either be too much sunlight (yes, young trees can actually have new leaves bleached / burnt by being in direct strong sunlight for too long), or it may simply be a weak / sickly plant. You get them every so often: a random genetic mutation or physical deformation in the seed it came from can ruin the plant's ability to survive, even in the best of care. Some plants just don't want to live, no matter how much you look after them. : /

Our garden is very good this year. Except for a few minor incidents involving rabbits, milkweed being blown over by storms, and lots of hot weather, it's all growing very well!
Everything else is either growing normally or exceeding expectations, even the elms. Heck, even the milkweed has returned to our garden!

Nice to know it's just the trees that are giving you problems. Hell, even here stuff's been growing well, despite the windy, cold and wet weather in the middle of summer. :)

Here's some of the links I promised. Most of these pictures were taken today, so it's up to date.

Those are all brilliant. Thanks! I'll post a picture of all the damn ash trees that refuse to stop popping up around my garden when I find my camera. :P

Characters remaining: 1,337. Lol.
Domo
Domo
  • Member since: Nov. 11, 2009
  • Offline.
Forum Stats
Member
Level 22
Gamer
Response to Newgrounds Horticultural Society. Aug. 6th, 2010 @ 07:38 PM Reply

Im not much of a gardener but I had some experience in the past.

I had a ficus,just an average plant(3 of them), and a cactus. But they all slowly died each day getting picked off like The bachelor. My ficus though I still have in my back yard,its not much of a backyard though not much attention to it any more but I still go water him.

My 3 average plants I ended up using as a science project. One I grew in the dark,on in sunlight, and one in normal light. MY sunlight one I forgot to water and it died. The one I grew in the normal light grew okay but I drowned it.

My cactus didn't have a good run. I had it for like 30 minutes and it was in the chair and I sat on it and got all these needles in my ass. But most importantly my cactus got squashed by my but. After getting alcohol rubbed on my but I got a good laugh about it.

This thread made me pay a little more attention to my plant and might take care of it a little more but I never been much of a planter.


BBS Signature
Ronald-McDonald-LoL
Ronald-McDonald-LoL
  • Member since: Jun. 9, 2006
  • Offline.
Forum Stats
Member
Level 41
Blank Slate
Response to Newgrounds Horticultural Society. Aug. 6th, 2010 @ 07:57 PM Reply

At 8/5/10 01:48 PM, Ronald-McDonald-LoL wrote:
How exactly are you transplanting them?

The majority of the oaks were sprouting in the lawn. (Darn squirrels.) I couldn't bring myself to run them over with the lawnmower, so I dug them up the best I could, considering that I didn't want huge holes in the lawn. It was hard to do, and I don't suggest getting your oak trees from someone's lawn.

It cant get much worse, right?

No, at this point, it can't. That bur oak shows everything that I've done right so far.
The trees that I bought online were bare-root, and I waited a week or so before planting them. Not my smartest move.
I'll try again this year.

Just out of interest, roughly where do you live?

Southern Michigan. We get some very harsh temperature extremes.

If there's nothing wrong with the roots, it could either be too much sunlight (yes, young trees can actually have new leaves bleached / burnt by being in direct strong sunlight for too long), or it may simply be a weak / sickly plant. You get them every so often: a random genetic mutation or physical deformation in the seed it came from can ruin the plant's ability to survive, even in the best of care. Some plants just don't want to live, no matter how much you look after them. : /

Yeah, thanks. I'm definitely going to take a good look at it. I'll look online and see what it says about sugar maple habitat and preferences, it took me a while to find that seed. Thanks for the tips.

Those are all brilliant. Thanks! I'll post a picture of all the damn ash trees that refuse to stop popping up around my garden when I find my camera. :P

Awesome, maybe I can identify exactly what kind of ash it is.


Dora Revolution | Descent Club | EGB | Sig by byteslinger. Click for my Twitch channel.

BBS Signature
Saren
Saren
  • Member since: Sep. 11, 2009
  • Offline.
Forum Stats
Member
Level 07
Blank Slate
Response to Newgrounds Horticultural Society. Aug. 6th, 2010 @ 07:59 PM Reply

Hey guys, I'm looking for certain legal high plants anyone got what I'm looking for....?


Just chillin'

Sheizenhammer
Sheizenhammer
  • Member since: Dec. 31, 2008
  • Offline.
Forum Stats
Member
Level 32
Blank Slate
Response to Newgrounds Horticultural Society. Aug. 7th, 2010 @ 08:20 PM Reply

At 8/6/10 07:57 PM, Ronald-McDonald-LoL wrote: The majority of the oaks were sprouting in the lawn. (Darn squirrels.) I couldn't bring myself to run them over with the lawnmower, so I dug them up the best I could, considering that I didn't want huge holes in the lawn. It was hard to do, and I don't suggest getting your oak trees from someone's lawn.

Ah, OK. Can't do much about that I suppose, since digging out a huge chunk of soil around them isn't going to work if it's in a lawn. Oh well...

No, at this point, it can't. That bur oak shows everything that I've done right so far.
The trees that I bought online were bare-root, and I waited a week or so before planting them. Not my smartest move.

Well there's your problem: Bare-rooted trees have lousy survival rates anyway. The reason leaving as much soil around the roots as possible is so important is because almost all species of tree rely on symbiotic fungi attached to the roots in order to get enough water and food to survive. Removing the soil destroys most of the fungus attached to the roots, meaning it'll have to re-grow before the tree can get enough food and water to survive unaided again. If the trees were in the process of leafing out, or growing in any way, when you got them, then they're basically trying to grow with a vastly ineffective system of finding nutrients to grow with.

Southern Michigan. We get some very harsh temperature extremes.

Hmm. Maybe it would be a good idea to get a cold frame or a cloche for the young trees to get bigger and harden off in. You'd be surprised how effective either method is at softening the blow the weather can deliver to small plants (especially considering how damn cheap both of them are to build - hell, my grandad has built a cold frame purely out of junk he found for free, and it works just as well as any bought one!).

Yeah, thanks. I'm definitely going to take a good look at it. I'll look online and see what it says about sugar maple habitat and preferences, it took me a while to find that seed. Thanks for the tips.

No problem. Lemme know how it gets on, m'kay? :)

Awesome, maybe I can identify exactly what kind of ash it is.

I'm pretty sure these are all black ash trees, if your old blog post about them is anything to go by. I'd have posted a picture by now but I've STILL lost my camera. Stupid mother and her incessant tidying up!