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Origin of Three Sheets to The Wind - Naval History Animated

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Check out my youtube channel:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCiy-XPoWThicpM30RGF_wbw

Where did the saying three sheets to the wind come from? This video is going to cover a common saying that is based in naval slang. It has always surprised me just how many of our English sayings and euphemisms come from the age of sailing.

Sources:

The Naval Heritage Foundation - United States Navy

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About me:
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I'm Imperial Scribe, I make animations about military and naval history as well as war theory. I put out 1-2 major battle videos per month with a number of shorter videos in between.

My twitter:
Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ISSubLink

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Suggestions:
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The Battle Of Isandlawanda:
http://bit.ly/BOIsandlawana

Why Did Sailors Swab The Deck?
http://bit.ly/WhyDidSailorsSwabTheDeck

Origin: "8 Bells and All's Well":
http://bit.ly/8BellsAndAllsWell

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Schedule:
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Upcoming videos:

June:
The Battle of Isandlawanda [full length]
The Battle of Roarks Drift [full length]
Ship of the line [Short length]
Origin: Three Sheets to the Wind [Short length]

Note: Schedule is tentative.

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Attributions:
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Music:
The Sky of Our Ancestors
Kevin Mcload
CCA license

Music (outro):
FarAway - Copyrightfreemusic
http://bit.ly/2KPtigC

Stock sound effects:
https://freesound.org/

May include miscellaneous licensed stock art.

Information is derived from a number of historical sources including websites, historians, and literature. The fog of history is a real thing, even relatively recent events often have sources in disagreement or relying on one another. When possible information is derived from first-hand sources and where not possible information is found by taking multiple second-hand sources. It is not possible for anyone to guarantee perfect historical accuracy, but I do my absolute best to ensure that all information in my videos is well sourced and backed up by historical sources and evidence.

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Kudos for the Naval History series. I felt the need to comment on this one. In sailing, a sheet is not a sail, it is the line (rope) that controls the sail. In a heavy storm, sailing ships would often "hove to" and lash the wheel windward and sheet jibs windward as well. Allowing the forward most sails to backfill would help to keep the ship on course and try to maintain some stability. A ship with three jibs sheeted was in the worst possible conditions and would appear to be rocking back and forth, while slowly making way forward, much like a drunken sailor.

Again, your explanation is in the right ballpark, just wanted to add a little to it.

I like interesting things like this.
Keep it up.

Credits & Info

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Uploaded
Dec 27, 2018
11:39 AM EST
Genre
Informative
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