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Uploaded
Jan 29, 2013 | 7:30 PM EST

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Author Comments

You have fallen into a vast underground maze. Can you find your way out, or will you end up trapped in darkness forever?

We recommend playing in a dimly lit room with your speaker or headphone volume turned up. It's best to play I Can't Escape late at night, as it is an eerie exploration experience.

Troubleshooting: This game requires flash player 11+. If you don't have flash player 11, the game will tell you, and you should download it (for free) here: http://get.adobe.com/flashplayer/ .

If you get the error "requires 3D hardware rendering," that means it's not running on your graphics card for some reason. Try right clicking the game, clicking settings, and make sure "enable hardware acceleration" is checked in the display tab, then refresh the page. If that doesn't work, try updating your graphics card driver or your flash player version.

If you're using windows 8, cheese123 mentioned to me that he couldn't get the game to run unless he ran chrome in windows 8 mode. If you're using windows 8 and having trouble, you can try that and see if it makes a difference. Thanks a lot to cheese123!

If you are still having trouble playing the game, feel free to send me a PM!

Want to know if it's possible to escape? You can check out this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R8mw9azY9qk .

Reviews


HandsomeTylerHandsomeTyler

Rated 3.5 / 5 stars

This is a beautiful retro game and I like the subtle detail you put into the ever deepening maze. I'm also really awed by the deceptive rules governing map generation. I really wish I knew how it was done.

I like what was discussed earlier with Vannius and agree it would make the game more satisfying while changing as little as possible.

Anyhow, I am only expanding on what was said earlier.

Finding an object inside the maze that unlocks the final exit on the first floor gives the player a more logical way of escaping and it would only require one more sprite.

To force the player to descend, and be demoralized by the atmosphere, you should scale the chance it spawns depending on how deep the player is. Maybe it could start spawning on level 7 (more than halfway down the maze) with a negligible chance of 1% and increase at an exponential rate until level 12 with a 25% spawn rate (or some terrible percentage because it's called I Can't Escape and replay value will come with the player's panic/fail/restarts and even further attempts of optimizing success, if there is any.)

As for the red 'X', which is a common impassable tile on lower levels, it should, as mentioned earlier, be replaced by the breakable stone doors as the final exit. As for the lower levels, you should decrease their appearances dramatically throughout, make them impassable without the tool and give them a 75-100% chance of allowing the player to ascend. As for the tool; one new sprite of a pickaxe (sledgehammer?) like you stated, placed in some previous human's remains because what is a soul consuming cavern without desiccated skeletons.

Anyhow... To force these or other changes from the author AND spoil your fun, here's a full (4min, yeah that's right) walkthrough:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NkvXJh BgN6w


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davidmaletz responds:

Thanks for the review! Yeah, I definitely think the "good" ending could've been improved, and there are lots of things I wanted to do but just didn't have the time (this game was made in a single month for the One Game A Month challenge). I may come back to this concept and make it a full game though, given how much people seem to like it!

As for the video, you're very perceptive! It's pretty cool to watch and read the notes (but only for people who have played the game - major spoilers!) If you're curious about how the procedural generation was done, and can read messy code, I actually uploaded the source code here: https://github.com/davidmaletz/CantEscape


bigjon7188bigjon7188

Rated 1.5 / 5 stars

Sorry your game has to many invisible holes
(and i know to look out for the patch of grass covered holes and ghosts)


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Der-MetzgermeisterDer-Metzgermeister

Rated 3.5 / 5 stars

Works perfectly on win 8 here (using opera).

The game itself didn't kept me captivated too long but it has that nice retro feel :)


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samantha2012samantha2012

Rated 5 / 5 stars

The look reminds me a little of Doom :)



cardboardbox13013cardboardbox13013

Rated 2.5 / 5 stars

I desperately want to like this game. It reminds me of happier days spent playing a public domain game called Labyrinth on my Commodore 64... but far more frustrating and unfair.

My first gripe is that when I find a ladder, almost always a) there's a hole in front of it, or b) no hole but I fall down anyway. This seems remarkably unfair, especially b). Whether this is an artifact of your maze generator, or deliberate, I cannot say.

The second is that you seem to have wandering monsters that drag you down if they touch you - but you never see or hear them coming. I suspect this is related to my "falling through solid floor" issue. Far more excitement could be had in the sequel by adding cues to indicate a monster's proximity and where.

Thirdly: Gates. Some open. Some don't. There is no visual cue as to whether one will open or not; no visual cue as to how many keys you have to open said gates. From comments I gather that you have to collect these and then find an X to reach the exit for the secret ending.

Finally... I am convinced that your maze generator modifies the levels during the game! In my last game, I walked around the cell holding an exit ladder, started again and found a gate and hidden doorway that wasn't there before. I don't know about you, but I rather like maps that stay relatively static. Who needs monsters when the maze itself seems to be the monster?

If you make a sequel, I suggest:
1) 'freezing' the generator during gameplay;
2) adding indication of monsters in vicinity (forcing the player to run away);
3) making the keys more important - say, by placing them on lower levels and forcing players to drop down to collect them, then struggle to conserve same on the way up;

Actually, with relation to 1), another option might be to, at regular and distressing intervals, have the maze move things around - holes, gates and so on - in other words, play up the angle of 'the maze IS the monster'. In other words, go down to get up - preferably without falling too far and being eaten.

So technically, a good concept, but unpleasantly hard in the wrong way as executed.


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