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Mastering for Electronica

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Rhoder
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Mastering for Electronica 2013-02-15 21:16:31 Reply

Hey guys it's me again. I've been getting interested in mastering to finish up my stuff top notch -like. I am currently using FL and I was wondering what mastering freebee tools could I use?

Also, how long does it really take to learn this stuff?

SpaceWhale
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Response to Mastering for Electronica 2013-02-15 21:21:41 Reply

Soundgoodizer's all you need, baby


Can you feel it mister Krabs?

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Rhoder
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Response to Mastering for Electronica 2013-02-15 21:24:48 Reply

At 2/15/13 09:21 PM, SpaceWhale wrote: Soundgoodizer's all you need, baby

oh, please don't.

Blackhole12
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Response to Mastering for Electronica 2013-02-15 21:48:20 Reply

If you are using FL studio, it should come with Maximus. It has shitty presets that make everything way too loud, but it's actually decently powerful and extremely useful for mastering. This plus the limiter should be all you need for a decent mastering job.

Professionals will obviously use tools like Ozone for doing crazy advanced tricks, but unless you plan on getting signed, it's really not necessary. Almost all the core aspects of mastering you need to worry about can be done with Maximus. As a quick primer, you want to cut bass below 30 Hz, make the entire low band mono, and do some stereo widening on the high band. You can get far more in-depth than that, but it will get you started.

Chemich
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Response to Mastering for Electronica 2013-02-15 22:18:16 Reply

At 2/15/13 09:48 PM, Blackhole12 wrote: If you are using FL studio, it should come with Maximus. It has shitty presets that make everything way too loud, but it's actually decently powerful and extremely useful for mastering. This plus the limiter should be all you need for a decent mastering job.

Professionals will obviously use tools like Ozone for doing crazy advanced tricks, but unless you plan on getting signed, it's really not necessary. Almost all the core aspects of mastering you need to worry about can be done with Maximus. As a quick primer, you want to cut bass below 30 Hz, make the entire low band mono, and do some stereo widening on the high band. You can get far more in-depth than that, but it will get you started.

This, but you should learn the crazy advanced shit whether you get signed or not. Test the boundaries of your creativity, then tell it to go fuck itself and go farther.


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Ragamuffin
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Response to Mastering for Electronica 2013-02-15 23:07:11 Reply

At 2/15/13 09:48 PM, Blackhole12 wrote: make the entire low band mono

Sometimes. There are some specific occasions where you want want stereo bass.
The rest of this advice is good, and generally always applies.

I cut frequencies below ~25hz, and above ~22,000hz, but this is just preference. At least cut below 30 and above 24,000.
When using graphic EQ to master anything, be sure to make very gentle, shaping curves, not sharp stabs.
If you don't have monitor/reference speakers, then be sure to listen to the track on different systems.
Use your spectrum analyzer of choice to visually see the track. Watch the different tracks solo and see what the most important frequencies are, and the track as a whole to see the blend of frequencies.
This is only what seems to be popular in modern music by my intentional observations/studies, and may ormay notbe the best way to do it, but most master tracks seems to either have flat EQ on the spectrum, or 3~6db more bass and high mids. This is, if you prefer to balance your frequencies visually, and don't have monitor speakers. If you do, I'd say trust your ears first.

I have nothing to say about master compression, because there are so many different philosophies about what's best sounding. It probably depends on the track. Maximus is a powerful tool, but don't go too hard with it. Learn to use limiters. Not to push 0db, but to avoid clipping.


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Ragamuffin
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Response to Mastering for Electronica 2013-02-16 11:38:54 Reply

At 2/15/13 11:07 PM, ATTW7-Envy wrote: Gibberish

Somebody please validate me? I feel awkward giving this kind of advice, as I was the one asking for it not all that long ago.


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seel
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Response to Mastering for Electronica 2013-02-16 13:37:43 Reply

At 2/15/13 11:07 PM, ATTW7-Envy wrote: I cut frequencies below ~25hz, and above ~22,000hz, but this is just preference. At least cut below 30 and above 24,000.

You don't need to lowpass any higher than 20khz, especially if you're working at 44.1 or 48khz since nyquist will be at 22 and 24khz respectively and I highly recommend you use a linear phase EQ for mastering. Also don't use too steep filter shapes (this especially applies to the highpass filter, rippling in low frequencies can get really bad). I'd recommend a lowpass between 18 and 20khz.

EQ -> compressor -> limiter (gotta get loud eh?), don't really need to get much fancier than that as a start. I usually put some saturation that works well with the source before the compressor. Whenever you decide to master your own mix, try to get everything right in the mix before going on trying to fix it with mastering. That should always yield a better result than some last minute 2bus EQ and stereo widening shenanigans.

seel
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Response to Mastering for Electronica 2013-02-16 13:43:21 Reply

At 2/16/13 01:37 PM, seel wrote: (this especially applies to the highpass filter, rippling in low frequencies can get really bad)

Doh, meant ringing.

Ragamuffin
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Response to Mastering for Electronica 2013-02-17 06:15:59 Reply

At 2/16/13 08:25 PM, ClockworkSpace wrote: Also theTransient Shaper and the Sausage Fattener, and you're good to go.

NI's Transient Master?


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Ragamuffin
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Response to Mastering for Electronica 2013-02-17 07:47:41 Reply

At 2/17/13 07:33 AM, ClockworkSpace wrote: I use the Schaack Audio Technologies Transient Shaper. It has a bit finer control

Oh, I see. So it does. Although both have their purpose, it seems. I prefer as few knobs as possible when I'm being creative, things like "Bass" and "Power" that are super generic. I always go back and replace these caveman things with more intelligent, useable ones in the mix, and I've been looking for a more in-depth version of Transient Master.

So thank you.

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Ragamuffin
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Response to Mastering for Electronica 2013-02-17 07:51:34 Reply

At 2/16/13 08:25 PM, ClockworkSpace wrote:
At 2/15/13 09:21 PM, SpaceWhale wrote: Soundgoodizer's all you need, baby
Also theTransient Shaper and the Sausage Fattener, and you're good to go.

Also, apologies for my double posting habit, but these are all good effects, but OP might want to learn how they do what they do. ie. Sausage Fattener is a compressor, a saturator, and an EQ. (Although I don't know in what order, I'd imagine Sat > EQ > Comp.)


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Sequenced
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Response to Mastering for Electronica 2013-02-18 10:26:25 Reply

At 2/17/13 07:51 AM, ATTW7-Envy wrote:

Also, apologies for my double posting habit, but these are all good effects, but OP might want to learn how they do what they do. ie. Sausage Fattener is a compressor, a saturator, and an EQ. (Although I don't know in what order, I'd imagine Sat > EQ > Comp.)

Lol sausage fattener?


lel

Ragamuffin
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Response to Mastering for Electronica 2013-02-18 11:39:47 Reply

At 2/18/13 10:26 AM, Sequenced wrote: Lol sausage fattener?

It's a popular plugin that only has two knobs. It instantly make things sound bigger.

Mastering for Electronica


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Sequenced
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Response to Mastering for Electronica 2013-02-18 11:49:47 Reply

At 2/18/13 11:39 AM, ATTW7-Envy wrote:
At 2/18/13 10:26 AM, Sequenced wrote: Lol sausage fattener?
It's a popular plugin that only has two knobs. It instantly make things sound bigger.

$29 my ass lmfao


lel

seel
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Response to Mastering for Electronica 2013-02-18 12:00:16 Reply

At 2/18/13 11:49 AM, Sequenced wrote: $29 my ass lmfao

You're implying that it can't be good because it doesn't cost a kidney? Never tried this particular plugin but I know plenty cheap plugs that give the big plugin brands a run for their money.

Ragamuffin
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Response to Mastering for Electronica 2013-02-18 12:20:10 Reply

At 2/18/13 11:49 AM, Sequenced wrote: $29 my ass lmfao

It's actually great for what it is.
Don't judge until you've tried it.


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Sequenced
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Response to Mastering for Electronica 2013-02-18 12:31:56 Reply

At 2/18/13 12:00 PM, seel wrote:
At 2/18/13 11:49 AM, Sequenced wrote: $29 my ass lmfao
You're implying that it can't be good because it doesn't cost a kidney? Never tried this particular plugin but I know plenty cheap plugs that give the big plugin brands a run for their money.

I really hope you guys caught the sarcasm there.

I'll be getting it... somewhere else... cough...


lel