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Reviews for "It Needs Care"

I don't know what to do. He ask for food and then gets sick and I canot help him in any way. I pressd the medicine and a pill comes out but he just stands there doing nothing and then he dies. I also press the food and a few bugs come out and I can even control the bugs but I have no idea how to feed them to the animal...

Wolod responds:

It was intended that gamer should figure out everything himself, but it seems that you really need help. Well, I can give a hint or two. Click on hatchling to select it, then click on spot where you want him to go (like in RTS games). Now you know how to feed your pet. To make pill work click it multiple times.

This game put's player in a very interesting position: he can either let his pet grow by feeding it, and then, eventually, get devoured by it, or let it die from disease and then get the usual "game over" ending. By such a clever positioning, game makes player, who use to think that he occupies active side in the gameplay, realize, that while playing seemingly on his own behalf he was actually acting on someone else’s behalf. I is almost as if you know that something bad is coming, but continue nevertheless, seduced by the game's space promise of cathartic closure. The main difference here from, say, movie being that it is the player, who is actively moving the game forward. It's interesting how, using its gameplay, this game manages to convey the idea about the activity of space and illusiveness of the freedom of choice.
With that said, though, I felt that as a game it could've been much better experience, if it had some progression in terms of gameplay, not only narratively. On each of the stages of your pet's development you have to perform exactly the same actions (usually in exactly the same order) with no change of rhythm, difficulty or variety. Due to your pet developing no new needs and requirements, the whole caring process quickly becomes boring and repetitive.
The only two things that kept me playing were narrative and audio/visual design. While the former was interesting and thrilling, but quite simple to follow and somewhat predictable, the former was amazing to watch at and listen to. Measured pace of background movements and wonderful ambient sounds created nice contrast with the simplistic tamagochi-like interface and sounds. It was almost suggesting that behind this friendly facade something sinister and ancient is hiding in the oceanic depths. This audio/visual theme well complemented the overall sinister feeling of helplessness in the face of coming doom and added some aesthetic variety.
I'd like to thank author for creating this wonderful game and wish him many more successful releases. In my opinion, your game is very smart and neat looking, but it's gameplay, the mechanics, that make any game a game, somewhat lags behind it's narrative and visual appeal.

Wolod responds:

Thanks a lot for this detailed review! I'm glad that you liked my game! You're totally right about the repetitiveness. This game was made just in a week for a jam. That's why I hadn't much time to implement all the features I wanted. I'm planning to release an update soon which will include multiple endings that will depend on player's choices and more variety in player's actions.

Good game, but for some reason, it keeps crashing my browser.

Wolod responds:

Glad that you've liked it. That's weird. What browser do you use?

My child betrayed me :_: Great game.

Wolod responds:

Thanks!

Wow, I have to sit down for as second.

That was a really great game, the sounds were absolutely excellent, pretty terrifying, etc. The fact that he went from a cute* baby squid to Cthulhu was pretty interesting. I liked the ending. It was pretty interesting.

Wolod responds:

Thank you very much! I'm glad that you've liked the experience.