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Reviews for "0RBITALIS"

Very nice, overall. The concept is refreshingly original in this, the Great Age of Tower Defense and Puzzle Platformers. There's something strangely satisfying about flinging an object into an intricate, semi-stable orbit around multiple celestial bodies.
I liked the minimalist aesthetic, with the gray static background and simple, geometric planets and stars. Adding too much detail would, I feel, distract from the essential puzzle aspect of the game, not to mention making it unnecessarily harder. That said, I feel it could have benefited from some simple, subtle background music. Nothing flashy, just something to fill the ear-space besides flat, hissing static.
If I have one semi-serious gripe, it's that the difficulty tends to yo-yo between levels. Specifically, those levels that just have one body, such as a star, tend to be too easy: just use the pathfinder to trace a line roughly in line with that of your orbit, and launch. Comparatively, the earlier levels with planets orbiting a star are quite a bit harder. I feel that the game would benefit from having single-body levels serve as an introduction to the orbiting mechanic, the level timer, and varying gravitational fields, among other things. That said, I also think you could scrap them entirely, and the game wouldn't suffer unduly as a result.
All in all, a very solid offering that could prove truly exceptional with a bit more polish. Keep up the good work.

AlanZucconi responds:

Ohhh, I wish I could have done some proper music! Unfortunately I didn't really have time for it (waster 12 hours on another prototype!) so I ended up putting white noise. Well, after all... there isn't sound in space, right? :D Yep, I should definitely re-arrange levels! One-star levels were sooo easy. Thank you for the nice words! :-)

Perfect+ overall, but Gamma polaris seems impossible.

Nice game, although I wish it would make it more obvious when you loop. As is, once you beat the final level (Gamma Polaris) it just instantly starts over. Also, for those of you who can't figure it out.... remember, you don't need a sustainable orbit. Just to stay in long enough to "gather the data." There are two ways to do this. Launch yourself in such a way as you get pingpong balled between both "antimatter" stars and they keep bouncing you in front of the other one, or just launching yourself in such a way you have such a low exit speed that you stay in the area long enough to win.

Very cool. Almost seems more like a toy than a game, but obviously there are levels to beat so it's a game. Really entertaining, although it involves a lot of guessing, you can figure out how to almost predict the orbit. Gets kinda repetitive, but what do you expect from a game made in 48 hours. Good Job.

Nice. I get goose bumps just to think the mathematics you had to use to make this. Still, some music would be nice. Nothing too loud.