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Reviews for "Bullet Chaos"

ehh

it's good but can be better i'll give it a six

its ok

i like it and i dislike it it gets alittle boring as you go on

I mean wow

I agree this could be better, not sure how, but i could. The start is a little boring, but the rest is cool.

Its ok

Its ok but it just isnt the best

Casual aesthetics. Hardcore sensibilities. Why? :/

Start with another permutation of simple geometrical vector graphics, add some nice bloom effects and quirky techno muzzak, and a shop full of viable upgrades, and you've got the next great casual defense game, right?

Well, not *quite.*

Spend some time with Bullet Chaos, and you'll see that under the surface, it's got hardcore arcade-style roots, and not in the good way. A good action game rewards skillful gameplay. *THIS* game instead *punishes* certian upgrade combinations.

For example, you could buy different weapons and switch between them, *or* you could install homing auto-turrets in those slots which stack with your current weapon. Sounds like a good idea, right?

Well, not really. Lots of levels have targets you're not supposed to hit. The best auto-turret releases shrapnel when they hit an enemy, which you had better believe cooks off every friendly target on the screen. Then when you blast through the enemy ships spawned DOOM-style from the friendly fire kills, you get a 5 star rating for that level. What? Was I supposed to not shoot them or was that really what you expected me to do all along?

I'm not saying the game is impossible to beat with this strategy, but it *is* impossible to get a good score in some levels with this loadout. And since the penalty for selling weapons is 25% of the price, and it takes about five levels before you really have enough money to buy anything interesting, experimentation is a long, slow, frustrating process.

And if that weren't bad enough, Bullet Chaos likes to hold out on you until the last wave, meaning the first wave in a level is something that all weapon combinations will take out without much trouble, but the final wave reveals that you're not doing enough damage fast enough. It's just one more way Bullet Chaos lets you think you're doing fine, then comes out of nowhere with something you didn't see coming, couldn't prepare for, and now you have to start all the way over from the beginning so you can buy a different weapons loadout. Strategy is developed incrementally over the course of the whole game, but challenges are presented only at the last moment.

It's a time-sink combined with on-the-job training and plenty of failure. I consider this the worst possible way to artificially extend gameplay.

The sad part is, this game has a ton of quality and nuanced gameplay. It's a great engine, with interesting variety to the levels and a ton of unique weapons. The final boss is awesome (once you figure out how to spawn it,) and not too hard. But the bullshit "Nintendo-Hard" difficulty curve ruins it. It could have been much more fun.

I'd like to see this game, same gameplay, only with *casual* scoring rules and failure states. Make it possible to sell weapons at no penalty; at least the un-upgraded ones, so the player can experiment freely. Make it possible to re-play earlier stages for a better score. Put a progress bar at the top so players can see how much longer the current stage is, and spread the difficulty out a bit more over the course of the stage. (Climactic endings are good, but not when they ending is so hard that my success in the beginning is misleading.) Counting down green dots to a true Game Over is pointless, because if you fail once level once, you probably need to start over from the beginning anyway and buy different weapons.

Bottom line: Replace the pass-or-fail surprises with stages that are easy to beat, but challenging to master. Encourage players to re-play earlier levels to suck more points out of them, perhaps with increasing difficulty levels (and score values) every time they beat the stage. Make experimentation easier and reward long-term progress, rather than punishing rookie mistakes.

This is a great game engine, but with poor meta-game planning choices on the part of the developer. By meta-game I mean menus, shops, and everything but the levels. I recommend gamezhero take some lessons from GemCraft and The Space Game, which had great meta-game rules and scoring systems.

Good game... Coulda been great. :/