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Would you say programming has gotten easier in recent years?

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Or rather at least easier to understand for beginners.


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Maybe, HTML and CSS was pretty easy to learn, but when it comes to programming languages it takes much more time and effort to understand.



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At 12/20/20 07:45 PM, Wegra wrote: Or rather at least easier to understand for beginners.


My first foray into programming included text books of examples of bits of code


Now we have flash storage and don't need to physically print code and can save it for later.


Yes.


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Yes, editors have made it easier, almost everyone is a programmer these days, so there is a tutorial for almost everything. So you don't even need to be a programmer to write code anyway.


Yeah and also 'No-Code' is comming into picture, so you'll dont even need code to create apps in a decade or so.


Actaully , for me I'm programming on Macromedia Flash application , making good games just for three stars (i meant 3 stars as average score in any of my games) , For me is Flash very simple , will try Construct app thingie ;-)


flagging stolen things

also i'm playing geometry dash <3 <3

report bad things <3

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Quite the opposite, the painful slog through NPM and modern paradigms is way harder. You could get pretty decently optimized 3d graphics with just 100 lines of C+opengl back in the day.


Now you have to learn about the browser, html, and Javascript before you can even draw text dynamically. Then you have to learn HTML5, CSS, and modern WebGL ES shader hell to get a rotating 3d cube.


Then there's wading through all the outdated and bad information about how you really need to babel your webpack before you git push to the CI server.


If ya have something to say, PM me. I have a lot of time to spare.

Also never PM egg82.

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At 12/25/20 02:17 PM, MintPaw wrote: Quite the opposite, the painful slog through NPM and modern paradigms is way harder. You could get pretty decently optimized 3d graphics with just 100 lines of C+opengl back in the day.

Now you have to learn about the browser, html, and Javascript before you can even draw text dynamically. Then you have to learn HTML5, CSS, and modern WebGL ES shader hell to get a rotating 3d cube.

Then there's wading through all the outdated and bad information about how you really need to babel your webpack before you git push to the CI server.


Yes, that's one perspective, web development tasks are considerably more programming intensive than they were a couple decades ago. In general that holds- there's more programmers, more freely available sources to become a good programmer, and thus higher demands.


The other perspective, is the evolution and proliferation of black boxes like Unity, Construct, Stenycl, etc. A lot of the programming can be abstracted away. So in the sense, it's easier to program cool things that would otherwise require substantial levels of effort.


Not sure if that 3D graphics comparison and LOC is the best metric to use though. By design, scripting and markup languages like HTML and Javascript are easier than any C/C++ dialect. And what can be done with 100 lines in C+opengl may be further reducible or partially automated through a graphics engine like Unity. Large blocks of code can be transformed to one liners via regular expressions and functional/lambda programming, the latter being a paradigm that is oft difficult for programmers to wrap their heads around.


I feel like programming used to be for people who would build their own punch-card computers from transistors and wires back in the 20th century.

Even computers back then used to be way simpler in terms of capabilities. So with less features to work with, programming in this sense was easier as you had less things to learn and more time (and motivation) to master your tools.


But now we have feature-rich processors with features like multithreading, dedicated graphical units. And there's not much time to spend mastering one tool, when you have to work with multiple tools at the same time. Especially when a new tool gets introduced and becomes "the thing" quite quickly, and you have to jump on it, because all the tools you used before are considered from the stone-age, despite being the defacto standard just a couple of years back.


Web dev is a real pain in the ass with all those novel tools and principles that change quicker than my mood. Java for Android won't be really a thing as Kotlin is now the way to go. C++? Nah my man, Rust that beech into safety.


But hey, what do I know. I spent 60 Euros on GameMaker Studio 2 like a benis, and I regret it with all my being.


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Things have definitely changed. I wouldn't it call it easier, but it's certainly different: what changed the game the most was how accessible information has gotten, how easy it is to share it, and the ways you can share it; specially as how abstraction went up in a few fronts.


A lot of stuff does not require you to understand how to do it but rather what do you want out of it (abstraction), and this becomes very upfront with stuff such as packages, like in Python/NPM for Node.js, and particular do-it-all "black-boxes", like the ones S3C brought up earlier in the thread (Unity, Gamemaker, etc).


This is all does not mean it's easy, exactly. A 16 year old following a tutorial on youtube would say it's easy, out of dunning kruger-ness probably. It's more of a double edged sword as, brought up earlier in this thread, you get a lot of information and resources; however a lot of it comes with poor or outdated documentation, and ultimately code that isn't yours, which would take a good while and experience to understand if you were to unwrap it.


One of the biggest issues I've witnessed is incredibly poor practices being perpetuated both at hobby and enterprise level as people begin delegating their programming solutions completely (these people won't even read the documentation, they'll just look for packages, or god forbid Stack Overflow code blocks to copy). Eventually you get the very fun scenario where the so-called "Engineer" has no idea why things start breaking or how to troubleshoot them.


As easily as people can make working apps for MVPs nowadays, people can put themselves in a dependency hell, with a spaghetti codebase, that they eventually abandon as they job hop to the next zoo that takes them in like the shit flinging chimps they are.