00:00
00:00
Newgrounds Background Image Theme

Our goal is for Newgrounds to be ad free for everyone! Become a Supporter today and help make this dream a reality!

Whats Your No. 1 Production Tip?

778 Views | 29 Replies
New Topic Respond to this Topic

Whats Your No. 1 Production Tip? 2020-07-24 14:13:00


As in what's the one tip that's had the biggest impact on your audio production? I'll start:


When EQing cut the thing that's in the way, rather than boost the thing you want more of.


Not a rule by any means but like, a best practice. So yeah, what you saying?

Response to Whats Your No. 1 Production Tip? 2020-07-24 16:08:20


Whenever you can use a real instrument, use it. It will liven up the mix, even if it just double some virtual one.

Response to Whats Your No. 1 Production Tip? 2020-07-24 16:24:38


Always make elevator music in an elevator.


BBS Signature

Response to Whats Your No. 1 Production Tip? 2020-07-24 23:55:00


Don't fart in the elevator.


BBS Signature

Response to Whats Your No. 1 Production Tip? 2020-07-25 01:41:11


do it later


And when you do it later, turn your farts into actual synth sounds.


No, I kid—


Well, the one thing I always recommend people: always make sure when EQing that each instrument has enough "air" (the 9 to 10Khz frequencies), so they sound like they're breathing. It sounds more life-like that way.

Response to Whats Your No. 1 Production Tip? 2020-07-25 05:03:12


Using a mastering plugin was a game-changer for me…

Response to Whats Your No. 1 Production Tip? 2020-07-25 07:13:57


My comment is regarding production in orchestral music.


Make sure your harmonies, arrangement, structure, and orchestration are good before you worry about production. With a solid composition, your track should sound decent prior to the mixing stage.


This thread has come up before. I'll repeat myself and add a new one or two.


  1. Mix in mono when working on EQ. So many reasons, too long to list. Just do it and thank me later.
  2. Learn how to use a compressor. No. Really. Learn how and WHY things work. It will up your game, especially in modern music.
  3. Keep a regular backup of all your work.

Rocker, Composer and World Ambassador for Foxes! I'm on Youtube. Veteran REAPER user. Ready to rock!

BBS Signature

Response to Whats Your No. 1 Production Tip? 2020-07-25 10:36:00


Reverb is important; it helps blend the instruments to sound like they're coming from the same room. Also, don't overdo it. Too much reverb will muddy up the mix. Less is more.


BBS Signature

Response to Whats Your No. 1 Production Tip? 2020-07-25 10:37:57


At 7/25/20 10:31 AM, MetalRenard wrote: This thread has come up before. I'll repeat myself and add a new one or two.


Best tips so far. 👏


Response to Whats Your No. 1 Production Tip? 2020-07-25 13:56:56


Learning Basic synthesis will help electronic producers a whole lot! I hear about producers spending loads on big synths (Serum, Massive, whatever happens to be cool right now) and then just using presets anyway? Synthesis will both help you understand the sounds you're using and help you create music that sounds like you! Even just learning subtractive synthesis can help you create so many sounds from Bass to bell sounds tbh. Most sounds I use are made by me; and if not then tweaked in some kind of way to get it to sound how i wanna.


Only if it's groovy.

BBS Signature

Response to Whats Your No. 1 Production Tip? 2020-07-25 15:55:30


At 7/25/20 01:56 PM, Troike wrote: Learning Basic synthesis will help electronic producers a whole lot! I hear about producers spending loads on big synths (Serum, Massive, whatever happens to be cool right now) and then just using presets anyway? Synthesis will both help you understand the sounds you're using and help you create music that sounds like you! Even just learning subtractive synthesis can help you create so many sounds from Bass to bell sounds tbh. Most sounds I use are made by me; and if not then tweaked in some kind of way to get it to sound how i wanna.


ive been making music for over 15 years now and I still use presets


fight me


lel

BBS Signature

Response to Whats Your No. 1 Production Tip? 2020-07-25 16:58:16


IMHO presets are fine. In my case, most of the time I just find it easier and quicker to make a specific synth sound from scratch than to find the right preset.


BBS Signature

Response to Whats Your No. 1 Production Tip? 2020-07-25 17:59:13


At 7/25/20 04:58 PM, CzySzy wrote: IMHO presets are fine. In my case, most of the time I just find it easier and quicker to make a specific synth sound from scratch than to find the right preset.


I think most people misunderstood me here, I've got no problem with people using presets; some of them are really good. I just think being able to create whatever sound you want from scratch gives you a massive advantage, even if you use presets as well.



Only if it's groovy.

BBS Signature

Response to Whats Your No. 1 Production Tip? 2020-07-25 23:51:45


Always wait a set amount of time, anywhere from 10 hours to 2 days, before exporting your final file and calling it done. You'll often catch m&m mistakes that your ear begins to ignore after a while. Critical listening can be fatiguing! In general, the longer you've worked on the song, the longer the duration to take a break from it.

Response to Whats Your No. 1 Production Tip? 2020-07-26 00:14:43


Don't saturate/distort with one plugin from the get-go, a better way to saturate is to use multiple plugins set at lower drives to get a better sound.


Also try processing/mixing some sounds as a bus instead of individually. This helps "glue" the sounds together so they don't sound all different. Stuff like reverb, saturation, and compression work well with gluing.

Response to Whats Your No. 1 Production Tip? 2020-07-28 12:34:05


Cut out all the low end below any meaningful/useful frequencies for each instrument, to stop the buildup of unnecessary rumblymud. Quite often even high frequency instruments have some room tone or whatever doing some sneaky rumbling down there. Do the same on your reverbs, and perhaps cut some of the high end from your reverb too if you want it to be a bit more subtle. This probably gave me the biggest improvements out of everything I've learnt!

Response to Whats Your No. 1 Production Tip? 2020-07-28 13:13:56


Sidechain until you can't anymore


ALL CATS ARE BEAUTIFUL

Response to Whats Your No. 1 Production Tip? 2020-07-30 04:29:57


At 7/28/20 01:13 PM, B0nn0t wrote: Sidechain until you can't anymore


hahahah


Certain analog emulations tend to behave in a similar fashion to their real counterparts if you run a signal way too hot, with either too many artifacts, clipping (or both) occurring. It's good practice to ensure you're not driving your signal into the red throughout your processing chain. It's also the first thing to check if something doesn't seem right in your chain.


| LD-W - Dark Sci-Fi, Psuedonatural, Celestial, Demonic, Abyssal and Occultist themes | Lich Is My Other NG Account |

BBS Signature

Response to Whats Your No. 1 Production Tip? 2020-07-30 08:08:43


Arrange and compose first, mix and master later. I find if I am spending too much time adding effects and tweaking while I'm composing, it disrupts the process. I've gotten better I now spend about 30% of the time mixing and mastering where I used to spend 50-60% of the time, and I think part of that is because I leave the production to the end once I'm satisfied with the instruments and composition.


Response to Whats Your No. 1 Production Tip? 2020-07-30 15:40:04


Master/global effects aside, always reduce other things instead of boosting the thing you want to hear more. That is, until you are about to add on the master effects. Peak amplitude of the master track before the effects makes a huge difference on how the master effects will work. Too low, you may end up with white noise. Too high, you'll end up with a mess.


At 7/25/20 10:36 AM, AceMantra wrote: Reverb is important; it helps blend the instruments to sound like they're coming from the same room. Also, don't overdo it. Too much reverb will muddy up the mix. Less is more.


Further on this: if you have a lot of instruments going on and your mix sounds messy: go through your channels and reduce the reverb a good bunch everywhere. The more you've got going the less reverb you want; if you've only got a few instruments, more reverb can make it a lot less bare. Tweaking the reverb settings to your liking can set the atmosphere you're after just right.


When making ambient, reverb is pretty much one of your instruments.


---


Also while we're on the topic of reverb, I've only started doing this the last few years, but: instead of putting the reverb directly on your instrument's mixer track, try putting the reverb on a "send" mixer track. Route your instrument both to the main mixer track, as well as the reverb mixer track. Play with how much of your mixer channel goes to the reverb channel.


This will make it so your "dry" instrument sound makes it into the mix + the reverb effect. Route several instruments to the same reverb mixer track this way and you'll only need one reverb plugin. You can also experiment with additional effects to put on there, can lead to interesting results.

Response to Whats Your No. 1 Production Tip? 2020-08-03 23:17:00


Alright, I have a few.


Sub bass - mono and right down the center. If your kick drops into this range, sidechain the christ out of your bass. Get a super-clean low end.


Comfort is hella important. Make sure you have a nice chair and headphones that dont crush your ears. Long sessions become magical.


Subtractive EQ is superior.


Listen to your track on really shitty speakers. I'm talking like samsung galaxy s2 speakerphone, or a chear BT speaker. It'll reveal issues with your mix clarity.


Spatial effects are incredibly important to add dynamics/space to your track. Reverbs and delays.


A GOOD MIX IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN A GOOD MASTER

As in, a good mix is 90% of your master ;)


BBS Signature

Response to Whats Your No. 1 Production Tip? 2020-11-16 17:14:47


You can take the audio of a water drop into a cup, and then bend the tone of the file into every note turning it into a synthetic instrument you know there's just so many option now for instrument


BBS Signature

Response to Whats Your No. 1 Production Tip? 2020-11-17 02:42:12


At 7/24/20 02:13 PM, AkioDaku wrote: When EQing cut the thing that's in the way, rather than boost the thing you want more of.


Further to this one, learn how to use EQ to spot conflicts. Listen to where instrument A drowns out the sound of instrument B. Open EQ on A, boost all the way to the ceiling and set Q as high as it goes. Start fiddling with the frequency until you find the spot where B takes the biggest hit. Gradually lower Q until the problem stops getting worse. Then, at that spot, cut instead of boost the EQ. I usually end up between -3 and -6 dB level for a subtle but significant improvement.

Response to Whats Your No. 1 Production Tip? 2020-11-17 02:51:42


At 11/17/20 02:42 AM, LuckyDee wrote:
At 7/24/20 02:13 PM, AkioDaku wrote: When EQing cut the thing that's in the way, rather than boost the thing you want more of.
Further to this one, learn how to use EQ to spot conflicts. Listen to where instrument A drowns out the sound of instrument B. Open EQ on A, boost all the way to the ceiling and set Q as high as it goes. Start fiddling with the frequency until you find the spot where B takes the biggest hit. Gradually lower Q until the problem stops getting worse. Then, at that spot, cut instead of boost the EQ. I usually end up between -3 and -6 dB level for a subtle but significant improvement.


I tend to do something similar in my EQs, except in the process of boosting I tend to use a moderate value of Q from the start, which can be helpful for cutting entire regions within the spectrum for something like a melodic part.

Response to Whats Your No. 1 Production Tip? 2020-11-18 00:37:39


Run your final mix on as many different set ups as possible, so headphones, speakers, a stereo, a friends stereo, a car etc. If the mix sounds good on all set ups, you have a mix.


A weird one, play your mix on speakers and go listen to it in another room, you will notice bass and treble peaks, why it works i have no clue but i swear by it.


LIKE YOU CARE WHAT I POST.

BBS Signature

Duplicate a track purely for the purpose of applying effects, and have it low in the mix. That way you can aggressively experiment with sounds without losing the essence of your original take.


I use this all the time!


www.youtube.com/wobwobrob

Game Audio Designer based in UK

Taking back the Video Game forum one post at a time.

BBS Signature