00:00
00:00

first day of being a freshman.

443 Views | 41 Replies
New Topic Respond to this Topic

Response to first day of being a freshman. 2019-09-07 06:53:30


At 9/7/19 06:48 AM, Sobolev wrote:
At 9/7/19 05:49 AM, DamnedByFate wrote:
I will agree, though, that the concept of the proof falls way too short.
https://mathrevise.weebly.com/27511236223543038988m2---pure-maths.html
What do you think of these past exam papers? They were university extrance exams.


Straight out of school, I would have gone under.


You can't fight for peace. If you fight, there ain't peace. NO, I'M NOT AMERICAN!

On every ship that floats and sails, there's someone who the captain nails.

Sig by Decky.

BBS Signature

Response to first day of being a freshman. 2019-09-11 01:15:38


At 9/7/19 03:50 AM, Sobolev wrote: IMO, many can’t do simple proofs because they are neither trained nor motivated to do so and they do not deserve to pass unless there are some changes.


I've been meaning to circle back on this post.

In the typical US Mathematics curriculum, proofs may be introduced in geometry and algebra. Students are not asked to write them. IMO this isn't reason for students to fail. What I feel is important for a budding STEM student is to show that they understand the intuition behind theorems and techniques, and are able to solve practical problems using critical thinking. But going to the level of proving theorems seems like an unnecessary level of rigor for a secondary school math student- there's a reason why proof-writing and discrete math isn't part of the required coursework for most engineering and natural sciences (including physics) majors. It's an essential but specialized skill for mathematicians and computer scientists, but not much else.


That said there are discrete mathematics courses offered in some high schools, but those are classes are exploratory and not part of the required algebra-geometry-calculus track. What introductory proofs would you have students write in a high-school discrete math course?

Response to first day of being a freshman. 2019-09-11 01:34:42


To me, mathematics without proofs is just arithmetics. No self-respecting teachers should call it maths.

Response to first day of being a freshman. 2019-09-11 01:55:30


Being a freshman was retarded. I got picked on a little bit, but it was mainly getting used to having to sit through half of my classes in silence waiting for all of my classmates to shut the fuck up.


Eres un maricón

BBS Signature

At 9/11/19 01:34 AM, Sobolev wrote: To me, mathematics without proofs is just arithmetics. No self-respecting teachers should call it maths.


a more appropriate word would be computation

nonetheless arithmetic is a subset of math

you also didn't answer my question

Response to first day of being a freshman. 2019-09-11 04:02:53


For an excellent samples of question for discrete math, check out the exam problems I linked.


The only thing I know is those problems are standard types of questions I encountered in my A Levels and no doubt high school students here are MUCH better than everywhere else in the world.


At 9/11/19 01:15 AM, S3C wrote: But going to the level of proving theorems seems like an unnecessary level of rigor for a secondary school math student- there's a reason why proof-writing and discrete math isn't part of the required coursework for most engineering and natural sciences (including physics) majors. It's an essential but specialized skill for mathematicians and computer scientists, but not much else.


It is interesting in its own right. And you seem to have a problem with this concept. You are like saying math is meaningless unless you combine it with some science.


By your logic, most people don't have to use any 'math' beyond simple addition in real life. So I suppose simple arithmetic is all they have to learn at school?


If learning how to add 19 and 32 is all you are interested in. Then fine, make a course out of it. But it call it a math.

Response to first day of being a freshman. 2019-09-11 09:05:09


At 9/7/19 06:48 AM, Sobolev wrote:
At 9/7/19 05:49 AM, DamnedByFate wrote:
I will agree, though, that the concept of the proof falls way too short.
https://mathrevise.weebly.com/27511236223543038988m2---pure-maths.html
What do you think of these past exam papers? They were university extrance exams.


https://airy-youtube-downloader.com/best/youtube-to-mp3.html

Response to first day of being a freshman. 2019-09-11 12:59:34


At 9/5/19 08:42 AM, tobuu wrote: I feel cool, yet screaming.


Nice

Response to first day of being a freshman. 2019-09-11 16:34:56


Sucked a Senior's and a Sophomore's dick 👌

Response to first day of being a freshman. 2019-09-12 03:59:06


At 9/11/19 08:33 AM, Sobolev wrote:
At 9/11/19 01:15 AM, S3C wrote: But going to the level of proving theorems seems like an unnecessary level of rigor for a secondary school math student- there's a reason why proof-writing and discrete math isn't part of the required coursework for most engineering and natural sciences (including physics) majors. It's an essential but specialized skill for mathematicians and computer scientists, but not much else.
It is interesting in its own right.


I agree. And that's best the reason to pursue something.


And you seem to have a problem with this concept.


I don't have a problem with it in and of itself

I do have a slight problem mandating in a standard math curriculum though, needless to say.

doesn't mean I'm not open to change or slightly conflicted on the matter


You are like saying math is meaningless unless you combine it with some science.


woah, please don't extrapolate that from what I said. I hope I haven't struck a nerve or something.

Not meaningless- I said theorem proving is a specialized skill that scientists in general, won't directly use. Maybe if you are a PhD doing theoretical work.


Society works by abstracting away concepts at certain levels. A UI designer for a game doesn't need to know the low level details of how asynchronous and operating system mechanics power the game engine. An intuition behind it is important, sure. And would never discourage the interested mind from digging deeper, if that's there thing.


By your logic, most people don't have to use any 'math' beyond simple addition in real life. So I suppose simple arithmetic is all they have to learn at school?


In some fields that's not far from the truth tbh. Engineers, scientists, and economists still will find use in calculus (thusly requiring algebra and geometry), statistics, differential equations, linear algebra.


I said that students should demonstrate the ability to critically think through problems. This goes beyond plugging and chugging formulas (after all computation is only the end result of mathematics- and quite frankly it's the least important step in the age of personal computers), and convincing mathematical analysis can be done without delving into the world of formal proof. so why are you insinuating that I'm advocating for an elementary school level curriculum?


If learning how to add 19 and 32 is all you are interested in. Then fine, make a course out of it. But it call it a math.


But it call it a math? I think you mean to say 'But don't call it math?' Addition is math tho

Response to first day of being a freshman. 2019-09-12 14:45:11


At 9/5/19 12:20 PM, JosephStarr wrote: Enjoy four more years of prison.
But instead of criminals, it's full of idiots.


Prison is also full of idiots. And not just the inmates.



OMG, Aborted Hitlercock is actually a band...