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khawill
khawill
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World Design 2017-05-09 00:09:54 Reply

So when creating non-real world settings, how do you go about creating your world? I like world building on the character and culture level, but I've always had issues making actual maps that connect it all together. For the context of this post, I actually mean the "world map" side of the game and not as much level design.

Zyg0te
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Response to World Design 2017-05-16 22:03:51 Reply

At 5/9/17 12:09 AM, khawill wrote: So when creating non-real world settings, how do you go about creating your world? I like world building on the character and culture level, but I've always had issues making actual maps that connect it all together. For the context of this post, I actually mean the "world map" side of the game and not as much level design

that's a very specific question, that might be difficult to answer.

I've never made any world settings, or maps for that matter, so my answer may be quite narrow-minded.

if I were to tackle a world setting, I would start it by incorporating what I think makes for a good world map.
such as,
#1. a sweet bond with player and world
I think the best worlds need to be memorable, if the world isn't very memorable then people won't make any meaningful connections with it. people will just see the setting as "another generic town" "another generic village."
how do you go about doing this? you would need detail, or something that makes the player notice it for a small context.
a good example of this would be Clock Town from Majora's Mask, I remember almost everything about the placement of anything in the town, and why? because there's so much to do in the town, it's rich with collectibles and side stories, you're almost always bound to cross paths with something interesting in the town.

TL;DR My advice would be to think small about the world if you really want to get in close with the player

#2 theme
if the concept of the settings don't fit the narrative (unless used to contrast and juxtapose said narrative) then you're going to get something that can't mix well. again, Majora's Mask is a very good example of this as well. it has the constant loom of death over head, portrayed by a very angry moon, meant as a possible allegory for the slow death of time we must all face one day. this theme is carried out to the people, the traveling carnies, and even the politics of the small town. how the clock in the middle of the town is a barrier that separates those that can manipulate time (link, mask salesman, skull kid) and those that can't (the people of termina). and finally, the extended metaphor of how people can happily cope with this impeding doom, we call time. through love, family, and pride. (kafei and anju, the mayor, the last townsperson who i cant remember the name of, respectively)

TL;DR dude idk i got lost ¯\_(ツ)_/¯