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Halla, god of ice and snow

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"Halla is one of the god sisters of the primordial forces. Much like her sisters, she was born not during the ultimatum, but after it, once Ukko and Umi had formed. Before, snow and ice was searing hot, and fire was blisteringly cold, but after the god sisters were born, order was placed, ice became cold and fire became hot, these facts were now maintained by the sisters by the decree of Ukko. However, even so, due to chaos, the third primordial sister, cold still sometimes can feel hot and vice versa.


Halla oftentimes has machinations with Kalma, and is indeed considered to be the farthest away from the primordial gods, Ukko and Umi. Her powers tend to manifest slowly, but sometimes can be devastating when they happen suddenly. It is no coincidence that the phenomenon of sudden frost on the ground carries her name, a phenomenon which causes terrible damage to crops. This has lead to her being one of the less popular deities, though she is respected, but it is mostly out of fear rather than adoration, for her presence rarely brings any boons, and her absence is almost always preferred.


However she is praised by many for her capability to preserve things that would decay in death. Indeed, in the far reaches of the north there are clans and tribes who hold her as their patron deity for her ability to preserve the bodies of the leaders of their clans for decades in cold vaults or ice caves. "

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She looks like she needs a warm coat and a mug of hot chocolate.

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Uploaded
Apr 8, 2020
3:24 PM EDT
Category
Illustration
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1700 x 948 px
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1,006.9 KB

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