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Dress-up Girls!

Score:
rated 2.20 / 5 stars
Views:
3,903 Views
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Genre:
Simulation - Other
Tags:
flash
dress
anime
dress-up

Credits & Info

Uploaded
Jul 14, 2014 | 5:10 PM EDT

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Author Comments

This was a commission for a dress-up game site-in-progress but the guy never messaged me back about payment, so a few days ago I told him if he didn't message me back before the weekend was over I now fully owned the game, so here we are!

This was made using Stencyl, an engine that should never be used to make dress-up games. If you play it just a little bit and have played others, you'll know why. I can't edit the hitbox of the items, so the drag-able area of each of the clothing items is the actual size of the original picture. I slimmed them down as far as I could, but it's still kinda messy, so just click the bows to reset. Ahh, I miss Flash...

Thank you for reading and playing!

Reviews


HagenSpearHagenSpear

Rated 3 / 5 stars

The art is cute enough that I'll give it a 3, but that's the best I can say about it--no easter eggs, no interactivity, nothing.

Also, this is included in the 'games with medals' section. Where the sam holy hill are the medals?



EXOkEXOk

Rated 2.5 / 5 stars

the art is nice, but it'll add more if you'll add more details to it.
maybe more clothes+option to change hair style/eye color/skin tone will add more.
the blue tank-shirt on the right side can't move\use.
try doing other games (not dressing games) with this style of art and it's can be really nice and cute~ :3
(i also saw in ur profile the art u posted- so try doing flash games with the same style too)
and the medal doesn't working for me..

2.5/5 for the art and the effort~


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KilbykinsKilbykins

Rated 1 / 5 stars

I wouldn't have paid for this, you were right Stencyl shouldn't be used to make dress-up games, when putting say the scarf over a top you cannot take the scarf off without the top going with it.
Doesn't give a lot of scope for changing outfits at will.



OctoraffeOctoraffe

Rated 0.5 / 5 stars

To be fair, after playing around with this for a bit, I can sort of see why he did not wish to pay you. I know that seems like a heavy insult, but it's really not. He should have messaged you, and he definitely SHOULD have paid you for your effort and time. As a commission artist myself, I will always defend an artist's right to get paid for their work.

But... this is a very poorly made game. Despite the Stencyl problems you described, there is almost no variety in clothing whatsoever. Not even multiple colors of the same item. The body bases are all the same (even eye color) with only a different hair style. The skin tone doesn't change at all. Perhaps I missed it, but there is no option to change eye color either. Two dresses, a single pair of pants, two pairs of shoes, one (misaligned) pair of gloves... It does not look like you put any real effort into this at all. When I look at the effort you put into the eyes on the model, and then look at the complete lack of detail in all of the clothing.... It's really quite a disappointing difference.

Your commissioner should have paid you for your work, don't let him get away with that. But this dress up game is very lacking.


MikomiKisomi responds:

Well, the thing was that I told him up front the stipulations that came with using Stencyl and he even saw the other games that were made with it but yet still wanted to commission me and stayed in contact until I sent him the link to the finished work.

I'm sorry you believe this, but I did actually put effort in this and followed the commissioner's request. He just wanted a game with a couple of hairstyles and a random assortment of clothes, something rather simple since it was going to be the first game of many he would pay for.


merrakmerrak

Rated 3 / 5 stars

Not bad. I agree with the reviewer below, you could certainly add more to it. 3 stars for effort, since it shows.

I can think of one potential workaround for your hit box problem. I experimented a bit and I think I ran into the same problem you did--the mouse pointer ignored the smaller collision box, and used the original dimensions of the actor.

Try making a tiny, invisible actor that follows the mouse pointer. If this actor collides with an item of clothing, that item is now able to be moved. If the invisible actor is not colliding, then the item can't be moved, regardless of whether or not the mouse pointer is over the image. Then you can use a custom polygon collision "box".


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MikomiKisomi responds:

That's interesting- so the weird polygon shapes would only come into play if the invisible actor were to hit it? I'll have to test that, that might work.