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Dec 4, 2012 | 6:28 AM EST
  • Daily 5th Place December 5, 2012

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Author Comments

Descend into the Dungeon of Chaos, retrieve the Amulet of Yendor, kill all who stand in your way and return with your prize.

Reviews


tclikemetclikeme

Rated 5 / 5 stars October 19, 2013

FINALLY. BEAT IT! Please make another.


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ZaneThePyschoClownZaneThePyschoClown

Rated 5 / 5 stars October 1, 2013

Epic game. Enough said, Lol.


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curtloadblowercurtloadblower

Rated 3.5 / 5 stars September 16, 2013

I like the challenge this game has, except when you get to chaos. There are too many random spawn kills, and the random runes end up hurting you more than helping. I also wish there was more variety, in weaponry power ups etc. Overall fun game been playing for 5 hours straight.

ps. Is it possible to beat the game? I am on level 56, whens it gonna eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeennnnnnnnnnnnnd.


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RadeshtkaRadeshtka

Rated 5 / 5 stars August 30, 2013

playing now. I LOVe. but it needs medals. not for achievements, but for story secrets, maybe? reminds me of that lovely gyosseit. maybe you and gyosseit guy should hook up and make something PHENOMENAL?


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malthusianmalthusian

Rated 5 / 5 stars August 23, 2013

For a game that announces virtually nothing about itself, there's a shocking amount of depth here. It goes with the lovely, restrained, minimalist ethic that governs everything about the game and its world; the gentle, early evening colors of the Overworld, the dark, oppressive monochrome of the Dungeons, an ethic interrupted by the shocking red of slain foes. A heroine who isn't particularly heroic, and who may in fact be the most frightening thing in the Dungeons. It took me viewing 'Lore' on the rogue herself to realize that this was not only an homage/satire, but in fact a direct sequel. The surprisingly deep narrative continues to construct itself expertly from that point, through scrawled messages on walls, listening on the dreams of the 'protagonist', and building your understanding of the world's 'lore' by many different means. Though this game (suitably, given its pedigree) is not interested in any kind of hand-holding and is relentlessly difficult and profoundly unforgiving of mistakes (PRESS 'Z' AND HOLD STILL CONSTANTLY OR DIE HORRIBLY), there are a surprisingly robust amount of paths to a decapitated (or otherwise non-living) Balrog, the Amulet, and victory. Again, pretty much all of these paths encourage our heroine to commit acts that are flagrantly antisocial and totally out of keeping with traditional notions of 'heroism'. Tearing out and eating enemy's hearts is crucial to surviving tight spots, and wearing the faces (and forms) of fallen foes is integral to any approach you care to take to killing the Balrog and claiming your prize. I finished it a day ago, and I still find myself coming back. I want to see more, to know more, to do more, master the strange world Red Rogue immerses me in. I want, in short, to play, and to experience. Is there anything more we can ask from a game?

Never has the unspoken love between a red-haired, skulking sociopath and her equally silent and heartless undead companion been so effective or arresting. I don't give five stars lightly, but the creatively-colored world of Red Rogue is one I'll be occupying for many years. For a cold procedural generation algorithm and a random number generator, there's a lot of love in this game.


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