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Jul 4, 2011 | 2:49 PM EDT

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Added some sound
This is again older post.
Hope You Enjoy!

Reviews


ExedorExedor

Rated 1 / 5 stars July 4, 2011

DOOD!!! :\

Well, it's obvious that you're detemined to continue making these. :\ To my surprise, and contrary to what others have done with this medium, it even appears as though you might be reading reviews and actually making a nice effort to improve. O_o Well, then let me try to help with some suggestions.

1. Use lots of lights, and get away from windows if possible. Watch your vid. Notice how the light is flickering? That's the wind blowing the trees outside. It varies the shadows coming thru the window. You may not be able to tell in the room, but the video captures and enhances the effect in a bad way. Use lots of lights- and don't move them- and your lighting will always be consistant. Consistancy is quality in stop-motion.

2. Stop the movement!. Although you TRY to keep the camera steady, the video proves that it's impossible. Tape your camera in place. If you have a small tri-pod, tape the tri-pod in place and tighten any adjustments so that NOTHING moves. When your camera angle and position don't fluctuate, your your video becomes steady and clean. If the camera moves slightly when you push the button, put the timer on for 2 seconds. (Mine has an option for 2, 5, or 10 seconds. The 2 second setting is for this purpose.) Push the button, and the timer will start which gives you time to let go of the camera and for it to stop moving before it snaps the picture. Then, proceed as normal to the next frame.

3. Make a background and be aware of what's visible in-camera. In "FIGHT" you did this on the kitchen table. Good for decent lighting, but bad for videos. We can see your kitchen, we can see people walking in the background, your little brother even came to watch you work. In "The stuff of random," you had junk on the table. Your character walked into a wire that was on the table, and you didn't even move it; he just walked along with it. That's sloppy work. So: make a background. You can open a cardboard box, tape it to the table, and even put plants, pictures, toys, drawings, a shrubbery, and other things on it to make some scenery for your film. Then, be aware of what's visible. If you make a background, but you point the camera to the side, what good does it do? You still end up with us seeing your Dad sitting in front of the TV in the background of your moonscape.

4. Remove things that don't belong. A pencil sharpener? Plates for dinner? Computer cords? If these are not part of your story, remove them. You can hide them behind your scenery.

5. Make a story and take more than a day to finish it. Have a story in mind before you start filming. If you make a story and fully finish the project in a few hours, your score will indicate that. Don't make it up as you go along. It can be a generic story too, but have one in mind. Here's a story idea for you: Guy saves Girl from the "Bad Guys." Now, you have to decide the rest. Does it happen on the moon? Does it happen in the olden days? Maybe it starts in the olden days, then goes to the moon, then stops in the future, and ends up at the bottom of the sea in Legoland! It's all up to you.

I hope these suggestions help you to understand the process a little better. You'll make better videos when you keep these things in mind.

:)


People find this review helpful!
MacBoxProductions responds:

Thanks for taking the time to make that list of tips :)


PapaZangiefPapaZangief

Rated 4 / 5 stars July 4, 2011

I liked it

And the audio was an improvement from your previous work. All I can say is well done and I look forward to more from you. Not a lot of people appreciate stop-motion animation nowadays which is a real shame. :(



Da-boiDa-boi

Rated 2 / 5 stars July 4, 2011

what song is that

is it from sesame street?


MacBoxProductions responds:

I Dont know


TervosTervos

Rated 0.5 / 5 stars July 4, 2011

ehhh

There is a lot of work that needs to be done. While I appreciate that stop motion requires a LOT of frames and images, the work I see it needing is, first, the music. while it does continue, it stops mid-tune and restarts. Second, what's the plot here? I don't see any, any story, and have no idea what is being told. Fix these, and you will have something that will likely have more potential, and higher ratings.


MacBoxProductions responds:

You are right there is no plot.
but again this is a older post.