Be a Supporter!

Credits & Info

Uploaded
Apr 23, 2010 | 10:05 PM EDT

If you liked this, check these out!


Author Comments

Short flash cartoon I made for an English assignment. I love you, Shakespeare. :heart: Characters used, Hayate and Yumi, are from my webcomic "Random Insanity". Hayate plays Hamlet seeing as how he's an actor and all and Yumi is Ophelia.

Please no critiques. I don't really like animating that much to begin with and flash is a major pain in the neck. I'm just putting this on here so that I have a back-up somewhere in case I lose the original. It's cheap animation anyway as you can see. Took me about 2-3 weeks to complete this, I think.

Reviews


darkwarrior1383darkwarrior1383

Rated 5 / 5 stars April 25, 2010

Hell Yeah To You Mylod Hamlet

It is nice that Shakespire is not lost, only reenvented



DevinshireDevinshire

Rated 4 / 5 stars April 24, 2010

Nice work

You did a good job with the animation and I like the art style. You did a good job with setting the mood too. My only complaint is that sometimes his voice seemed out of place, Like when he seemed to get angry (facial expression wise) but his voice remained monotone. I know this is from a school assignment but I just wanted to share my opinion.



Zelda-Gamer0Zelda-Gamer0

Rated 2 / 5 stars April 24, 2010

Did you really even read the play?

I know you said that you weren't the best at flash, and I understand that; I can't really say I've even really tried it before. But, this is not a review on the flash, it is a review on the actual play and scene. You say at the end that you know there is no skeleton in the castle at that point, which is good. The problem that I have with it is a lot of what Dracco said: there is no life or emotion in his voice. This is supposed to be a deep scene with Hamlet as he reflects on death, which, I guess you kinda got with the really bored sounding voice. However, what really got me, was that when he says "Soft you now! The fair Ophelia!" he isn't just thinking of her, she is really there in the castle and has been listening to him the entire time really along with her father and he running over to her and happy to see her and then scene goes on from there as he finds out she is really almost working against him.

Again, I'm not judging you on your art skills really, more of that it seems like you read the monologue and that was it; that you didn't even look at the few lines before or after the actual monologue. That's all that got to me really (being someone that has actually played Hamlet in a production of the play)


People find this review helpful!
RavenIga responds:

Yes I read the play. This is not my voice. I would've done it myself but sticking a girl voice on a guy would've been awkward. XD

I know the voice is bad, but I didn't have much time to work with my actor as the assignment was due in a little under 2 weeks. I think I may have him redo the voice though with more emotion since I've got time now, but for until then I need it up here as a back up since flash is quite possibly the most unreliable program I've ever worked with. Thanks for the review.


Dracco0085Dracco0085

Rated 3 / 5 stars April 24, 2010

meh

The animation was ok, there were a few jumps in parts that needed to be smoothed out. The voice acting was bad, there was no depth or emotion to it.

I would figrue that if you were to take the time to animate a flash, something that you could easily put a week into that you should at least take the extra minute or two to actually ACT, what you put up sounded like a bored highschooler reading the play in class.



ZingkingZingking

Rated 3.5 / 5 stars April 24, 2010

Hmm,,,

The animation was pretty good, and the music was good, but it was the voice acting that took away from the experience of enjoying it fully. I mean one can see you are trying to convey different emotions from the facial expressions of the character but it is that very fact that is your downfall. You were unable to fully show that emotion because the voice acting had very little emotion, it was as if the voice acting was merely there to let you know what he was saying, and was not connected to the animation it self.