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Credits & Info

Uploaded
Sep 16, 2008 | 7:13 PM EDT

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Author Comments

Create and defend the common knowledge from the vectorial class. Liberate the passive consumers from the domain of the market.

Notes:
The game can be won and is intended to be short, don't complain about it :-)

Reviews


GoldenPwnerofGamesGoldenPwnerofGames

Rated 5 / 5 stars July 5, 2010

Excellent this is what art should be.

Sent the message but was still fun to play :)

A wonderful game , it was quite hard but after i successfully managed to liberate the passive consumers from the domain of the market and afterward felt really proud to have finished the game

PS: Now only we could do this in real life!.



antonechauzantonechauz

Rated 0 / 5 stars July 5, 2010

Boring!!

Dull repetitive and boring. Dumb concept and idea.



SuperslayerSuperslayer

Rated 0.5 / 5 stars July 4, 2010

Absolutely terrible game with a terrible concept.

First off -- WHAT???

All you people complaining about it being impossible... WHAT??!?!

This game is IMPOSSIBLE to lose!!! I've been trying...

While it is irritating in it's shoddy engine and programming mechanics, it is difficult to 'win', but also much, much harder to lose.

Second, what????????? Just because something is copyrighted doesn't mean knowlege is hoarded. The only knowlege that is 'hoarded' in today's society are the things that are 'classified' by the U.S. government. Sadly, it is true that a lot of companies don't share information relevant to new inventions right away, but all that becomes increasingly available as they become outdated. For example, the PSP was created by an amateur inventor tinkering around with a bunch of parts from PSX's!!!

Get a brain Jackass.



this310this310

Rated 1 / 5 stars July 4, 2010

fail

not a good game it's imposable



nicolamalfinicolamalfi

Rated 1 / 5 stars July 3, 2010

Guy below me is right

When would the right to knowing things become a priviledge. That's not even true in third-world countries, in fact one guy built an average sized windmill out of all the materials he could find in his town, in Africa. All you need to learn is the willingness to create, modesty in success, and optimism in failure.