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pirateplatypus
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Response to Programming Regs Lounge Nov. 2nd, 2012 @ 10:47 PM Reply

At 11/2/12 04:00 PM, Diki wrote: My sister used to work in a call centre, and she told me that she had a lot of Americans whom spoke to her were happy that she is able "to speak American".

It's usually the people with the really heavy drawls and broken English that get pissy about whether or not you're from North 'Murica.

Also that sounds like you were frequently speaking to Texans and Floridians. I don't know what it is about those two states but damn a lot of people from there are stupid.

I'd say that's a pretty fair assessment. Though Utah, California, and Georgia rank up there.

Canuck has only one "n" in it. ;)

Crap, can I pretend that 'mistake' was made on purpose for the sake of irony?


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egg82
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Response to Programming Regs Lounge Nov. 3rd, 2012 @ 01:26 AM Reply

At 11/2/12 10:47 PM, pirateplatypus wrote: I'd say that's a pretty fair assessment. Though Utah, California, and Georgia rank up there.

California's like that "special needs" cousin everyone has.
You only ever see them at Christmas, but when they show up you remember why you don't ever talk to them in the first place.


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Response to Programming Regs Lounge Nov. 3rd, 2012 @ 06:45 AM Reply

At 11/3/12 01:26 AM, egg82 wrote: California's like that "special needs" cousin everyone has.
You only ever see them at Christmas, but when they show up you remember why you don't ever talk to them in the first place.

lol I agree with that! They have severe special needs out there!

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Response to Programming Regs Lounge Nov. 3rd, 2012 @ 09:17 AM Reply

Figure maybe I'd participate in here although I'm new to programming and don't have to offer in terms of quality discussion.

About a year and a half ago, I attempted to take up AS 3, didn't go so well and only retained some basic concepts. Moved on to C# which also flopped for some reason and just recently started getting back into it. Honestly, it's only a hobby that I plan to pursue because I've always been interested in making games and I figure it'd be a fun way to occupy my time as well the skills I could learn wouldn't be bad either.

I've got a good chunk of the core down, well at least I can understand a good amount of it as well as apply it to practice things I've been making myself do. I currently took a break from learning new concepts to apply what I've learned so far in the form of a seemingly simple console application that functions as an "rpg game". So far I've really enjoyed the problem solving aspect and been pushing myself to add things into the game that aren't so cut and dry(requires me to reach outside of what I know to come up with solutions to my problem).

But I have two questions(not so much programming help as in code but programming aspects) maybe some people can take the time to answer:
1) What are some things you wish you would of known early on when you started programming? As well any "pro tips" you could provide that you think I should consider or at least look into?
2) For game makers, when it comes to coming up with equations for how things work(in reference to an RPG for instance, how a defense stat would work), how do you come up with ideas or where do you get your source of inspiration?

Hope I'm not out of line with those questions, if I so apologize. Hopefully in the future I can contribute more to this thread as my ability goes.

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Response to Programming Regs Lounge Nov. 3rd, 2012 @ 03:15 PM Reply

At 11/3/12 06:45 AM, Jessii wrote: lol I agree with that! They have severe special needs out there!

I mean the state itself :P


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Diki
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Response to Programming Regs Lounge Nov. 3rd, 2012 @ 04:17 PM Reply

At 11/3/12 09:17 AM, SomeTurtle wrote: 1) What are some things you wish you would of known early on when you started programming?

When I first started out I definitely didn't appreciate the importance of design documents, commenting and version control. You can get away with not writing design documents (they're tedious as hell so I wouldn't blame you), but if you're not commenting your code or using version control (I recommend Git) you should remedy that. If you want to see an example of the level of commenting I am talking about you can check out a JavaScript framework that I wrote here.

It's also a good idea to start small. When I was still learning I always bit off more than I could chew; attempted projects that were far outside my skill level, and ultimately it was detrimental to my learning, and I never finished those projects, so just be sure to choose a project that you know you can finish but will still be a challenge for you.

So basically make sure to write lots of comments, use version control, and choose an appropriately difficult project. You choosing a console-based project is a very good idea; GUI programming is a colossal bitch, even in languages like C# or Java that do it rather succinctly.

At 11/3/12 09:17 AM, SomeTurtle wrote: As well any "pro tips" you could provide that you think I should consider or at least look into?

Read books on programming that have been recently published and/or updated. Reading older books is still helpful, but keeping up to date will be more-so. Learn Code the Hard Way is a series of freely available books on Python, Ruby, C, Regex, SQL and CLI. I've read all of them, and cannot recommend them enough (which I do a lot on here).

And I think the absolute best tip anyone can ever give you is: practice, practice, practice. Programming is a skill and you'll never hone it without years of practice. For reference I have been programming for 10 years and I still have a lot to learn, not that I am trying to discourage you.

At 11/3/12 09:17 AM, SomeTurtle wrote: 2) For game makers, when it comes to coming up with equations for how things work(in reference to an RPG for instance, how a defense stat would work), how do you come up with ideas or where do you get your source of inspiration?

It's been a long time since I've done game development, but when I did I generally just tinkered with the game mechanics in a test environment until I got a feel that I desired.
For example a few years ago I was working on an RPG battle system and wanted to have attacking damage be randomised within a given range based on the strength of the attacker and the defence of the attackee. To do this I just adjusted both values based on the result of a pseudorandom number generation (let's say between 1 and 20), which itself was randomly altered based on a luck attribute, and then increased the result so that it was at minimum above 50 or so (this will depend on how much HP you would give your characters). Then I just used a loop to execute the calculation like 1000 times and averaged out the result in mean, median and mode. Once I got my desired mean, and the mode wasn't ridiculous, I was happy; the median so much didn't matter I found.

I don't know how much sense all of that will make to you, or if it's even helpful, but that's how I did it. Can't say it's the best way, and it's probably not, but it worked for what I needed.

kiwi-kiwi
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Response to Programming Regs Lounge Nov. 3rd, 2012 @ 05:05 PM Reply

At 11/3/12 09:17 AM, SomeTurtle wrote: 2) For game makers, when it comes to coming up with equations for how things work(in reference to an RPG for instance, how a defense stat would work), how do you come up with ideas or where do you get your source of inspiration?

Build yourself a program that makes x units of a given type and stats fight y units of a given type and stats, then simulate battles between creatures with different statistics then balance based on fight results. I usually keep everything exponential (easy = 1, medium = 2, hard = 4, omgf*** = 8), to e interpreted as low tier enemies should be able to kill each other, medium tier should be killed by 2 lower tier enemies with a high rate of success (85% is acceptable) and so forth.
Another idea I had sometime ago but haven't tried putting it in practice was using lotka volterra equations to simulate the interaction between defense and attack(attack is the predator, defense is the prey) but I'm not sure how easy it would be to make something fun this way in practice

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Response to Programming Regs Lounge Nov. 3rd, 2012 @ 06:32 PM Reply

Messing about with Android for the first time, other than the time I went through one of the tutorials in the Android site. I'm starting to get my head around how it works. I've been working on a piece of coursework that has us creating a simple multi-choice quiz app. My implementation feels like a bit of a hack at the minute but it's doing what it's supposed to.

I've got that questions and answers hard coded into the app just now but we get extra marks if we get the questions/answers from remote XML files. I hate parsing XML in Java. I don't know why but it's always something that takes me a good while to remember how to implement. Doesn't help that I usually use DOM because I can get my head around it easier but seeing as we're working on mobile devices, it's better to use SAX, which I believe is a little more complex than DOM.

I reckon I'm going to spend more of my free time fiddling about with Android. I should be doing that anyway seeing as my final year project is Android based. My problem is coming up with ideas for an app that will teach me something and actually be useful to me. I have much more motivation if I'm writing software that I can actually put to personal use.


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SomeTurtle
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Response to Programming Regs Lounge Nov. 3rd, 2012 @ 06:34 PM Reply

At 11/3/12 04:17 PM, Diki wrote: post

Wow, thanks for the great post, not sure what you mean by version control but I'll look into it. As well I know practice is the key and that's why I took the chance to pause on learning and apply what I've learned. I selected something that actually wasn't as far out of my realm as possible, it'll take me more then a day to finish but I've learned a lot of things from the project itself.

Also I know commenting is a must, obviously not everything needs to be commented but after getting done with a program session in one class file, the code becomes really hectic.

At 11/3/12 05:05 PM, kiwi-kiwi wrote: post

Interesting take, I never thought of that definitely going to have to apply this later on when I get to that part in my project.

Thanks a lot guys!

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Response to Programming Regs Lounge Nov. 3rd, 2012 @ 08:40 PM Reply

At 11/3/12 06:34 PM, SomeTurtle wrote: not sure what you mean by version control but I'll look into it.

Version control is basically a system that saves a version of your code as you're writing it. For example say you're working on a project and you add a new feature, you would use version control to save a backup of everything you changed to add that feature. It's useful for backing up code in case you accidentally break something, as well it allows other developers to observe changes you have made to something.

To use my project as an example again you can look at all of the commits I've made for my JavaScript framework here (a "commit" is what I am referring to when I said saving a backup). If you click on any of those commits it will show the before/after (red is before, green is after) of the code I changed.
Should give you an idea of what version control is.

At 11/3/12 06:34 PM, SomeTurtle wrote: Also I know commenting is a must, obviously not everything needs to be commented

That's correct. You should really only be commenting code that's not obvious what it is doing based on the code itself. However I personally write a class and function header for every single class and function that I write, it's just something that my C++ professor taught me in college and has stuck with me.
A good rule of thumb to work with is that it's better to have too many comments than too little.

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Response to Programming Regs Lounge Nov. 3rd, 2012 @ 08:54 PM Reply

At 11/3/12 03:15 PM, egg82 wrote: I mean the state itself :P

I know. The state is a disaster and the people there are an even bigger disaster. However, I think that we can say that much of the east coast is a disaster right now though (still not as big of a disaster as California though!).

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Response to Programming Regs Lounge Nov. 3rd, 2012 @ 09:20 PM Reply

At 11/3/12 08:40 PM, Diki wrote: post

Ahh, I see what you mean. Curious how would I go about doing such a thing? I'm guessing that's something that I would use github for? Or is it something like Microsoft Visual Studio has built in?

As well I've read that too about comments, I try to comment every method, even if it's brief and variables that aren't obvious.

Thanks again for your input!

<Got some extra wind, going back to some coding>

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Response to Programming Regs Lounge Nov. 3rd, 2012 @ 10:25 PM Reply

At 11/3/12 09:20 PM, SomeTurtle wrote: Curious how would I go about doing such a thing? I'm guessing that's something that I would use github for? Or is it something like Microsoft Visual Studio has built in?

GitHub is only a website that some people created to host Git repositories. Using Git does not require you to use GitHub, though I still recommend that you do, otherwise you'll be storing your repos on your harddrive, so if something ever happens to your computer you could potentially lose your repos.
And, no, Visual Studio doesn't have any form of version control built into it; VS is only a C# and C++ IDE.

To use Git you just need to install it on your computer, which you can get from here. After you install it you will use a command-line program called git bash and enter commands to create and use your repositories (also called "repos").

To create a repo simply make a folder that you want to store your repo in (this is typically the root directory for your project, where all the source code is found). Using git bash navigate to said folder using the cd command (short for "change directory") and then use the git init command. On my system I would do something like this:

cd D:/Projects/Python/MyNewThing/
git init

That will make a new repo in the "MyNewThing" directory.
Then to add/update your code in the repo you do the same thing. Add the file(s) to the current update using the git add command, and then commit the changes using the git commit command. Like this:

git add main.py
git add foo.py
git add bar.py
git commit -m "Updated main, foo, and bar. Changed some important stuff."

Note: for this to work you must be in your working directory by using the "cd" command outlined above.

That will commit main, foo, and bar. The -m argument stands for "message", and the following string is the message (obviously). Technically you can commit without a message but don't ever do that.
You don't need to commit multiple files at once, and you should only do so if the changes in each files you made are related. I just did that for the sake of example.

And that's it. There isn't much to it.

GitHub has an excellent and thorough tutorial on using Git with their service here that you can check out, and of course if there's anything you're having trouble with or don't understand you can just post in this thread, or make your own, to ask a question and myself or someone else will be more than happy to help you out.

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Response to Programming Regs Lounge Nov. 3rd, 2012 @ 10:47 PM Reply

At 11/3/12 10:25 PM, Diki wrote: post

Wow thanks a lot man I really appreciate it. Unfortunately too tired to get it working tonight but I'll be trying to apply it to my next project. I'll probably start using GitHub at one point or another, but for now the little programs I'm making aren't useful to any one at this point.

Just got done with some coding, was able to make "dynamic" inventory system/equip system, which is a small milestone for some but a big deal for me since this morning I wasn't sure I could even manage. Already learned to think things out a little more before getting into coding, as I continued I realized I could of saved myself some time by properly utilizing inheritance as well as little bits here and there.

Overall though for a first project I think this is going pretty well, it's amazing how much of a kick I get out of the smallest edition.

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Response to Programming Regs Lounge Nov. 3rd, 2012 @ 11:02 PM Reply

To use Git you just need to install it on your computer, which you can get from here. After you install it you will use a command-line program called git bash and enter commands to create and use your repositories (also called "repos").

Might I add on that if you use Windows, tortoiseSVN has a GUI that makes repo's a bit easier to manage/understand.

If you're coding in C#, microsoft provides free hosting of projects. Only catch is that it has to be an opensource project.


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Response to Programming Regs Lounge Nov. 3rd, 2012 @ 11:13 PM Reply

At 11/3/12 10:47 PM, SomeTurtle wrote: Wow thanks a lot man I really appreciate it.

No problem buddy. My pleasure.

At 11/3/12 11:02 PM, Thegluestickman wrote: Might I add on that if you use Windows, tortoiseSVN has a GUI that makes repo's a bit easier to manage/understand.

That's true. Though I use Git on Windows without any problems, but I started using Git after already learning how version control works, so take that with a grain of salt.
Though if you do use TortoiseSVN you won't be able to use GitHub, obviously, as it uses Subversion as the version control system instead of Git.

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Response to Programming Regs Lounge Nov. 5th, 2012 @ 02:19 PM Reply

All this talk of Git and Github has reminded me that I really need to make more of an effort to familiarise myself with that. Only problem is that most of the stuff I've been working on recently has been coursework, so it's maybe not the best idea to be making it publicly available when I'm working on it. Not that it's likely any of my classmates would come across it but still, better to play it safe. Come to think of it, I think I can get a few free private repos as a student.

Something else I want to add of my imaginary list of stuff to do is look into regular expressions. They look pretty horrific to me but I hear they're not too bad once you get used to them and are pretty useful from time to time.


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Response to Programming Regs Lounge Nov. 5th, 2012 @ 02:24 PM Reply

At 11/5/12 02:19 PM, Dean wrote: Something else I want to add of my imaginary list of stuff to do is look into regular expressions. They look pretty horrific to me but I hear they're not too bad once you get used to them and are pretty useful from time to time.

this helped me quite a bit. Just mouse over your regex string and it'll tell you exactly what it does.

then you can test it, of course.


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Response to Programming Regs Lounge Nov. 5th, 2012 @ 02:50 PM Reply

At 11/5/12 02:19 PM, Dean wrote: Come to think of it, I think I can get a few free private repos as a student.

Github offers students the microplan for free, just email them. You get to have 5 private repos and unlimited colaborators.
You can also try unfuddle if you want to.

Something else I want to add of my imaginary list of stuff to do is look into regular expressions. They look pretty horrific to me but I hear they're not too bad once you get used to them and are pretty useful from time to time.

Regular expressions are finite state machines, it's easier if you try to imagine them as a series of transitions than a huge blob of text, not to mention that you're probably going to have a course that will try to teach you exactly that (mine was called automated formal languages).

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Response to Programming Regs Lounge Nov. 5th, 2012 @ 02:56 PM Reply

At 11/5/12 02:24 PM, egg82 wrote: this helped me quite a bit. Just mouse over your regex string and it'll tell you exactly what it does.

Thanks.

At 11/5/12 02:50 PM, kiwi-kiwi wrote: you're probably going to have a course that will try to teach you exactly that (mine was called automated formal languages).

At this stage, I doubt it. We've had a lecturer suggest we use them when we were writing a Turning machine last year but we've never had regular expressions taught to us. I still have one semester of classes to go before I graduate but I'm signed up for Network Applications and Computer Games Programming, neither of which seem likely to utilise regex although I may be wrong.


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Response to Programming Regs Lounge Nov. 5th, 2012 @ 02:59 PM Reply

http://bitbucket.org are reasonable, very github like now and have much better pricing (tl:dr; free private repos)

I was always lazy about version control then github released the windows client and now I always use it because they made it easy for my lazy self

also it's fucking november 5th and I want to go to bed because I've been awake 26 hours and ALL I CAN HEAR IS BANG WHIZZ

BOOM

BANG

WHIZZZ

BOOOOOOOOM

fucking fireworks god damnit

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Response to Programming Regs Lounge Nov. 5th, 2012 @ 03:59 PM Reply

At 11/5/12 02:19 PM, Dean wrote: Something else I want to add of my imaginary list of stuff to do is look into regular expressions. They look pretty horrific to me but I hear they're not too bad once you get used to them and are pretty useful from time to time.

The gskinner link that egg82 posted is a great resource, but my personal favourite regex tool is RegexBuddy. It isn't free, but is only $40.00 and well worth it in my opinion. I bought it a few years ago and it's be infinitely useful.

Also, as usual for me, I'm gonna recommend another Learn Code the Hard Way book. There is one written on regex. It's not complete yet, but it should still get you up and running with regular expressions.

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Response to Programming Regs Lounge Nov. 5th, 2012 @ 04:29 PM Reply

At 11/5/12 03:59 PM, Diki wrote: The gskinner link that egg82 posted is a great resource, but my personal favourite regex tool is RegexBuddy. It isn't free, but is only $40.00 and well worth it in my opinion. I bought it a few years ago and it's be infinitely useful.

I know $40 isn't all that much but I've been trying to keep hold of as much money as I can get my hands on. The idea being that I'll build myself a decent computer capable of running some decent games not too long after my birthday in January. I've never had the luxury of owning a gaming PC. I always took the console route when it came to video games but I'm starting to lose faith in consoles. PC gaming is definitely looking to be the way forward for me.

Although the Ouya also sounds really interesting if anything ever comes of it.

Also, as usual for me, I'm gonna recommend another Learn Code the Hard Way book. There is one written on regex. It's not complete yet, but it should still get you up and running with regular expressions.

I'll definitely take a look into this. I had a read through the Python book a little while back and also glanced over the Ruby book. If those books were anything to go by, I can see the Regex book being very useful.

There's so much stuff that I'd like to familiarise myself with before graduating but I'm really struggling to find the time. Scary to think that by summer I'll probably be looking for work. I would like to end up writing software for a living but I just feel as though there are plenty people who have more to offer an employer than I do. I know that's probably not the best attitude to have, but that's how I feel. I'm by no means the worst coder out there but at the same time, I feel like I have a long way to go when I compare myself to some of the people that are around me.

Trying to find a software development job in my area might prove to be tricky as well. There'd be more opportunity in Edinburgh, but I don't actually live there. I'm about an hour away. Obvious resolution there would be to move into the city, but to do that I need money, and to get money I need a job. Vicious circle. I should really be trying to make plans for what I'll do after I graduate.


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Response to Programming Regs Lounge Nov. 5th, 2012 @ 05:02 PM Reply

At 11/5/12 04:29 PM, Dean wrote: I would like to end up writing software for a living but I just feel as though there are plenty people who have more to offer an employer than I do.

Let me show you a website dedicated to asking what was in the heads of the people employed to do generally mundane tasks for money (link)
Seriously, if they can get a job and keep it long enough to end up there, why wouldn't you after getting a college diploma.
Just try and find out what are the entry level salaries are in your area and if you can afford it, don't accept any offers until you get close to what they have. Also try to find a place where you can learn more from your superiors than they can learn from you.

And most importantly, don't worry, you'll see that by summer next year, you'll be drinking expensive beer at the beach.

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Response to Programming Regs Lounge Nov. 5th, 2012 @ 05:17 PM Reply

At 11/5/12 05:02 PM, kiwi-kiwi wrote: Let me show you a website dedicated to asking what was in the heads of the people employed to do generally mundane tasks for money (link)

"You don't understand, It doesn't look broken."

oh, my.


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Response to Programming Regs Lounge Nov. 5th, 2012 @ 05:53 PM Reply

At 11/5/12 05:02 PM, kiwi-kiwi wrote: And most importantly, don't worry, you'll see that by summer next year, you'll be drinking expensive beer at the beach.

Have you been to any Scottish beaches before? They're not exactly anything to get excited about. Haha. A wee bit too cold!


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Response to Programming Regs Lounge Nov. 5th, 2012 @ 06:24 PM Reply

At 11/5/12 05:53 PM, Dean wrote: Have you been to any Scottish beaches before? They're not exactly anything to get excited about. Haha. A wee bit too cold!

Ah, a fellow Scot, eh? I'm Canadian, but my grandparents on my mother's side were born and raised in Scotland, so I'm half Scottish. Cheers, buddy.

And I wouldn't worry too much about having difficulty finding work. So long as you're not some aspergic shut-in with no social skills and aren't an incompetent buffoon you should be fine. You'll probably have to take a few shitty jobs before you land a good one, but if you just be persistent it will work out.

At 11/5/12 04:29 PM, Dean wrote: I just feel as though there are plenty people who have more to offer an employer than I do.

Once you start working professionally there is one cold hard fact you will unfortunately come to realise: the majority of programmers working today don't know what they're doing.
This article does a good job of summarising it.

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Response to Programming Regs Lounge Nov. 5th, 2012 @ 06:57 PM Reply

At 11/5/12 02:56 PM, Dean wrote: regular expressions

Mastering Regular Expressions: Jeff Friedl.

http://shop.oreilly.com/product/9780596528126.do

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Response to Programming Regs Lounge Nov. 5th, 2012 @ 08:13 PM Reply

At 11/5/12 06:24 PM, Diki wrote: Ah, a fellow Scot, eh? I'm Canadian, but my grandparents on my mother's side were born and raised in Scotland, so I'm half Scottish. Cheers, buddy.

I'm led to believe that a lot of Canadians have Scottish ancestry. I'm sure quite a good number of Scots migrated to Canada back in the days when migrating was the popular thing to do. It's strange in a sense because there's some kind of internal voice that tells me if I ever do choose to live in another country, Canada is where I should go. I highly doubt I ever will leave the UK though. I'm too fond of living here. Part of me wants to move down into England once I get older and have the ability to do something like that. Not really sure why though.

And I wouldn't worry too much about having difficulty finding work. So long as you're not some aspergic shut-in with no social skills and aren't an incompetent buffoon you should be fine.

I don't fall into the socially awkward category. Thankfully I don't fall into the arrogant and overconfident category either. As for working shitty jobs, I don't think that's something that would particularly bother me to begin with. It's expected anyway. Work experience is experience at the end of the day.

This article does a good job of summarising it.

Haha, I've read this before. Actually, I think you may have linked it before (or someone did) because I remember a few of us posting our solutions to the FizzBuzz challenge. Writing an implementation of a linked list would take a little more effort but I don't think that should be difficult.

I got side tracked. Decided to see if I could implement a singly linked list in Java. It lives! Took me a little longer than I expected though. I should probably try implementing a few other data structures, just to makes sure I can.

At 11/5/12 06:57 PM, liljim wrote: Mastering Regular Expressions: Jeff Friedl.

Thanks Jim. If I decide to take the book route, I'll keep it in mind.


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Response to Programming Regs Lounge Nov. 5th, 2012 @ 08:45 PM Reply

At 11/5/12 08:13 PM, Dean wrote: I'm led to believe that a lot of Canadians have Scottish ancestry. I'm sure quite a good number of Scots migrated to Canada back in the days when migrating was the popular thing to do.

A good portion of Canadians just a few generations back from my own are European immigrants. Had I paid closer attention in my highschool anthropology class I could go into more detail, but alas I did not.

At 11/5/12 08:13 PM, Dean wrote: It's strange in a sense because there's some kind of internal voice that tells me if I ever do choose to live in another country, Canada is where I should go. I highly doubt I ever will leave the UK though.

You could always come visit and experience first hand our world-famous politeness. We're almost polite to a fault here. :)

At 11/5/12 08:13 PM, Dean wrote: Haha, I've read this before. Actually, I think you may have linked it before (or someone did) because I remember a few of us posting our solutions to the FizzBuzz challenge.

That was probably me. I know I've linked to it more than once on these forums.

At 11/5/12 08:13 PM, Dean wrote: Writing an implementation of a linked list would take a little more effort but I don't think that should be difficult.

Once you know how linked lists work and all that it's really not that difficult, and doesn't even require that much code. Unless you're writing in C++, of course, in which case it will require a fair amount of code. To illustrate that you can check out this port of the C++ Standard Vector class that I'm working on as part of my portfolio. It's incomplete, and the formatting got screwed up, but it's still a lot of code for something that really doesn't do that much.
It also illustrates how much I like to show off my code. What can I say? I like people checking out my work. :)