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Home recording Studio

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WebbtheMonk
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Home recording Studio Jun. 29th, 2005 @ 08:05 AM Reply

I have been told that i can cheaply set up a home recording studio using Reason 3.0,Soundforge 8 and other software. But does anyone know the best ways to improve on this so i can allow direct input recording of insruments like guitar or vocals through a mic directly into the pc?

speedmetalmessiah
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Response to Home recording Studio Jun. 29th, 2005 @ 09:55 AM Reply

Well if you want to plug a mic directly into your pc just buy one and plug it in then make sure your settings are set up so the audio comes through the mic.Although if you don't have at least an alright mic or a good amp and guitar the quality won't be the best.If you wan't to record yourself playing guitar I would suggest you buy a digitech multi-effects pedal and plug it into the direct in input on you computer.The higher up models like the gnx2 are pretty cheap and they allow you to plug in multiple instruments and even a mic for vocals.Plus it comes with a crap load of effects and the quality is great.

I hope I helped and I hope this is what you were talking about or else I completely wasted your time.Sorry if I did.

jarrydn
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Response to Home recording Studio Jun. 29th, 2005 @ 10:35 AM Reply

Don't waste your money on nasty digital multi-effects.

Get yourself a metalzone distortion pedal from ebay (I picked up mine for $80AUD), and run it straight into your computers line in.

Record it into your multi-tracker of choice. I use Acid Pro 4...pretty easy to learn the basics of, but you'd be better off getting something like Cubase SX (it'll be alot better in the long run...i'm attempting to make the change at the moment :P).

Now, the guitar will most likely sound like shit recorded directly in, in which case you need to shape the EQ on the computer after it's been recorded, or you could run it through an amp simulation.

You could lose the pedal all together and go for Native Instruments GuitarRig. Some very nice sounds, but the distortion models leave a bit to be desired...

Microphone wise, unless you're going for a gritty lo-fi kind of vocal sound (which I'm using quite a bit now...I picked up a CB mic and attached a phono plug to it so I could run it through my mixer, kind of like Mike Patton from Fantomas), you'll want to buy something better than a cheap computer dynamic microphone. See if you can find a Shure SM-57 (uni-directional) or SM-58 (omni-directional) microphone. You can find them for less than $100 if you're lucky, and they are industry standard microphones.

To make them sound like high-end tube mics, you could purchase a Behringer Tube Pre-amp...i think they go for $60 or $70...although I could be mistaken.

Also, back onto effects, in the 3rd quarter of 2005, Behringer are releasing a whole range of guitar-pedals based on existing boss pedals (such as the MT-2 Metalzone, DD-3 Digital Delay, FL-1 Flanger etc). These are ultra cheap too (between $40 and $70 brand new), so that might be your answer to guitar effects.

Hope I've helped you out somewhat :)

jobelow
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Response to Home recording Studio Jun. 30th, 2005 @ 04:00 AM Reply

At 6/29/05 10:35 AM, jarrydn wrote: CB mic

Bad.Ass.

Here's another fun recipe:

Record your vocals in a multitrack recorder, open just the vocal track as Wav in a wav editor and downsample to 44.1khz/4-bit. That is some nice distortion.

jarrydn
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Response to Home recording Studio Jun. 30th, 2005 @ 10:02 AM Reply

At 6/30/05 04:00 AM, jobelow wrote: Record your vocals in a multitrack recorder, open just the vocal track as Wav in a wav editor and downsample to 44.1khz/4-bit. That is some nice distortion.:

Phwoar nasty! I didn't even know 4 bits was supported! I'm gonna give this a shot :)

I used to run vocals through a bandpass filter, but the CB mic is dirtying things up nicely :). Still sounds a bit too clear, so I might put a capacitor over the speakre terminals to further limit the bandwidth :D

jobelow
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Response to Home recording Studio Jun. 30th, 2005 @ 11:28 AM Reply

a lot of digital equipment nowadays, mostly samplers, sometimes effects boxes, have bit reduction, where you can actually downsample all the way to 2-bits and anywhere in between. It's some godawful distortion. I can't get enough of it.

jarrydn
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Response to Home recording Studio Jun. 30th, 2005 @ 11:46 AM Reply

Ahhh yeah, Battery can do that :).

I thought you meant actually converting and saving a file as 4 bits. I thought the lowest windows supported was 8.

I'm not particularly fond of the way Battery handles the 'bit-crushing' so to speak. It only really tends to add the dirt onto the tail of the sample, unless you do something extreme...like reducing it to under 5 bits.