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Martial Arts Club

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Response to Martial Arts Club 2012-07-23 16:30:04 Reply

Hey to join must I practice in a pro place with a teacher and all. I mostly practice at home. Can someone just reply telling me the requirements for joining?


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Response to Martial Arts Club 2012-09-14 17:42:25 Reply

I started Bujinkan last week. I find it interesting because of its variety, hand to hand combat, judo, jujutsu. weapon techniques, ukemi and all kinds of things are included.

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Response to Martial Arts Club 2012-12-09 00:42:43 Reply

Judo, Karate, Aikido, Taekwondo, Zui Quan, Muy Thai, Boxing, and FreeStyle.

1-10 years experience.

Also, wish to find a sparring partner near me, its been awhile and want to start practicing again.


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Response to Martial Arts Club 2012-12-09 21:25:54 Reply

I used to quite a bit of martial arts back in my day. It was a blend of different styles my master had picked up over his many years and it seemed well rounded enough. I should probably get back into it.

Anyways, I wonder about the effectiveness of grappling in a real street fight. It seems like the second you tried to wrestle a guy his friends would start stomping your head with their boots.


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Response to Martial Arts Club 2012-12-09 21:57:21 Reply

At 12/9/12 09:25 PM, Cootie wrote: I used to quite a bit of martial arts back in my day. It was a blend of different styles my master had picked up over his many years and it seemed well rounded enough. I should probably get back into it.

Anyways, I wonder about the effectiveness of grappling in a real street fight. It seems like the second you tried to wrestle a guy his friends would start stomping your head with their boots.

I do not recommend grappling in a street fight, unless its a style made for combat with multiple people.

Ground styles are the best at it though, since it makes it harder for them to catch you when your moving about fast and low.


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Response to Martial Arts Club 2012-12-12 12:08:34 Reply

At 12/9/12 09:25 PM, Cootie wrote: I used to quite a bit of martial arts back in my day. It was a blend of different styles my master had picked up over his many years and it seemed well rounded enough. I should probably get back into it.

Anyways, I wonder about the effectiveness of grappling in a real street fight. It seems like the second you tried to wrestle a guy his friends would start stomping your head with their boots.

Depends on how many people there are and what their skill levels are. Against two guys, it can be advantageous to put one guy between you and the other (as they taught us in Systema) as a shield, sometimes even with three, Especially in tight spaces like small alleys, hallways, stairwells, bathrooms. In tight spaces and when cornered, one must generally consider that the route of escape will be through, not around or away from, their assailants. Backing yourself into a corner with one of the opponents locked up in an injurious hold is a gambit of desperation, but it is generally better than being flanked and surrounded (your number one threat). However, keeping one of them locked up with their shoulder/elbow/wrist broken/dislocated/terribly mangled (fingers work well for disabling, but once someone's finger/thumb is broken they can lose the impetus not to resist and wrest themselves away since they usually have the full power and leverage of their arm, the other arm and their body at their disposal and you've already broken it) and cattle-plowing with them through the other opponent(s) Can be effective, especially if they are friends who really care about one another and do not want you to injure their compatriot further. That said, never count on pity or mercy, either for you or amongst themselves. In an open space, however, your best bet is to use quick-injury techniques, minimize entanglement and get the fuck out.

When multiple people attack one, they generally rely on one another heavily instead of acting as tactically-individual combatants in cohesion with a group. They let one guy make first and primary contact and the rest will jump in and out, picking potshots, waiting for him to tangle you up, and they will almost immediately try to flank you and get behind you. Excepting trained or experienced fighters, or crazy nutshits on tweak, most people who will rove in packs or get into dumb fights in groups will shy away from any chance of getting hit or hurt if one of the group occupies the most threatened position of primary contact. Usually there's one powerful fighter who occupies alpha role and will be expected to engage. The most dangerous aspect is that they will instinctively move to get behind you, at which point their (generally) unorganized combat style will inevitably be effective. Keeping everyone on one side of you is one of the most important considerations in one-on-many combat, if not the most important, and if you can control one body and keep it in between you and the other you're halfway there. If you have someone in a chicken wing and he's screaming bloody murder over his dislocated shoulder and torn tendons and fascia, he's pretty much going to go wherever you put him with next to no resistance.

The key to minimizing entanglement is to keep your grappling at mid and long range (mid and long grappling range). Eg., no torso-to-torso contact. The exception is with throws and Judo techniques where hip and thigh contact are integral, but otherwise only grab hands and elbows until your control of the opponent's body is secured and you are either behind him or safely in control of him, then, if appropriate, contact the shoulder. Choking someone in a one-on-multiple scenario is highly disadvantageous, however there is an exception to every rule and sometimes one must choose a lesser evil over a greater one to survive an encounter.

Grappling techniques like key locks, wrist locks, finger holds and quick, minimal-entanglement maneuvers are perfectly applicable to such a situation. You just have to be willing to actually injure someone immediately with murderous force rather than simply submitting them with pain alone and increasing force by degrees. More than two guys, however, and the extent of your grappling should be wrist, finger, elbow and rarely shoulder techniques designed to break or dislocate quickly.

And, of course, Never go to the ground with one guy if there are any others still fighting. Ever.


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Response to Martial Arts Club 2013-07-31 00:54:25 Reply

Alright, this thread's been tapped out for eight months now.

Bumpalicious

Anyone ever done Tai Chi? I've been teaching my friends push-hands (or, more appropriately, sensing-hands), which is all about softness and subtlety. It's gorgeous.


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Response to Martial Arts Club 2013-08-15 15:34:08 Reply

Anybody?

I know this thread isn't dead.


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Response to Martial Arts Club 2014-11-04 14:28:02 (edited 2014-11-04 14:35:00) Reply

Been training in Muay Thai for 2 years, one under Shawn Yarborough and one under Lisa King (if you guys were wondering who taught me.)

In 2015, I'm going back to train with Shawn, plus the addition of Chaz Mulkey.

Plus I have a MMA News page on Facebook, we give all the UFC, Bellator, WSOF, Glory updates, results, breaking news, etc.

Give this page a like, we really need to get off the ground! Thanks!

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Response to Martial Arts Club 2014-11-11 00:32:39 Reply

Someone should a real life fight club like the movie Fight Club. :D

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Response to Martial Arts Club 2014-11-11 20:02:27 Reply

At 7/31/13 12:54 AM, Lagerkapo wrote:
Anyone ever done Tai Chi? I've been teaching my friends push-hands (or, more appropriately, sensing-hands), which is all about softness and subtlety. It's gorgeous.

Yes! I can't believe there was a thread for this and that no one responded here to this.

The first few movements in the standard Taijiquan have extremely effective, real life martial applications. It's not just good for your organs :P

In fact, the first move (stepping to the left, allowing the hands to raise like balloons), is actually a method for evading an attack and countering with the back of the wrist onto someone's chin (although most people wouldn't teach/reveal it to the student in that way.). Fun stuff, but like any style, form/power comes first, speed later. :D

I've also been a daily QiGong practitioner for quite some time even though I should practice more frequently than I do.

Sticky hands (as I like to call them) are also quite good for defending yourself. Enough practice and blocking trained boxers becomes a breeze.

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Response to Martial Arts Club 2014-11-13 03:51:51 Reply

At 11/11/14 08:02 PM, frootza wrote:
At 7/31/13 12:54 AM, Lagerkapo wrote:
Anyone ever done Tai Chi? I've been teaching my friends push-hands (or, more appropriately, sensing-hands), which is all about softness and subtlety. It's gorgeous.
Yes! I can't believe there was a thread for this and that no one responded here to this.

This was very active for many years, but in the last several years it's been quite dead.

I've thrown out quite some walls of text in here, and I have also said many things that, in retrospect, were not very right. It comes with time, I suppose.


The first few movements in the standard Taijiquan have extremely effective, real life martial applications. It's not just good for your organs :P

In fact, the first move (stepping to the left, allowing the hands to raise like balloons), is actually a method for evading an attack and countering with the back of the wrist onto someone's chin (although most people wouldn't teach/reveal it to the student in that way.). Fun stuff, but like any style, form/power comes first, speed later. :D

Which form/school of Tai Chi did/do you study? They are all similar but very different. I went to college for shortened Lee form (Chen Man Chin's adaptation) and in high school I believe I did a Wu variation, although I can't remember.


I've also been a daily QiGong practitioner for quite some time even though I should practice more frequently than I do.

Sticky hands (as I like to call them) are also quite good for defending yourself. Enough practice and blocking trained boxers becomes a breeze.

Well, blocking a trained (and moreover skillful) boxer is hardly a breeze, but it definitely allows one greater alacrity when trying to redirect force.

I've done a fair amount of different martial arts for a few weeks or months at a time and tried to integrate the different principles and methods of them all into a general understanding of the mechanics of combat as opposed to trying to manifest any individual form...

(systema, kendo/iaido, freeform swordfighting/LARPing, MMA with a strong focus on sambo/Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, muy boran/escrima, kenpo/kung fu, tons of fucking around with friends (some of whom were very seriously trained and scary as hell), two forms of Tai Chi (I dual majored in tai chi and psychology in college), lots and lots and fucking lots of staff/baton/stick spinning)

Also a reiki master level healer/teacher, ran the student group for energy healing practice at my university for two years, fairly well psychic, and that all applies to being able to sense the energy centers of the person in front of me and read their movements/find the spots that will hurt etcetera.

Meh.

Push hands, sticky hands, "sensing hands," it's a great practice.

The other week I was doing it with a friend where we could use a reasonable amount of purely muscular force (as opposed to minimal) and didn't need to stay in one spot. We could step around however we liked, and it was really good. He's very skillful, but I found myself making hand-torso placements to indicate hits more than would have been fully advantageous to manipulation of his center mass. Both are applicable.

It's like chess in three dimensions, in real time, and with force.


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Response to Martial Arts Club 2014-11-13 13:17:32 Reply

At 11/13/14 03:51 AM, Lagerkapo wrote:
At 11/11/14 08:02 PM, frootza wrote:
At 7/31/13 12:54 AM, Lagerkapo wrote:
This was very active for many years, but in the last several years it's been quite dead.

I've thrown out quite some walls of text in here, and I have also said many things that, in retrospect, were not very right. It comes with time, I suppose.
Which form/school of Tai Chi did/do you study? They are all similar but very different. I went to college for shortened Lee form (Chen Man Chin's adaptation) and in high school I believe I did a Wu variation, although I can't remember.

I believe I was studying Chen's as well, though I could be wrong. Don't take my word for it though since it was a very long time ago and I really only remember the most basic "phrase", stepping to the left, looking to the left along with the various visualizations, (which I believe are taught wrong most of the time anyway based on my Qi Gong experience. If you think lo ma bu was bad, wait until you get into the more intense postures while "standing" on bricks!)

Well, blocking a trained (and moreover skillful) boxer is hardly a breeze, but it definitely allows one greater alacrity when trying to redirect force.

Trained boxers in my experience think they are (for lack of a better term) "hot shit", but they bounce around too much and want to show off looking like Ali, getting floored with a simple leg swoop. The radius of the method I practice covers their entire attack radius but does take more speed and power than with the usual training wheels. In a ring it's pretty useful but not in a bar! (In my opinion/experience)

I've done a fair amount of different martial arts for a few weeks or months at a time and tried to integrate the different principles and methods of them all into a general understanding of the mechanics of combat as opposed to trying to manifest any individual form...

(systema, kendo/iaido, freeform swordfighting/LARPing, MMA with a strong focus on sambo/Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, muy boran/escrima, kenpo/kung fu, tons of fucking around with friends (some of whom were very seriously trained and scary as hell), two forms of Tai Chi (I dual majored in tai chi and psychology in college), lots and lots and fucking lots of staff/baton/stick spinning)

Cool stuff! I had no idea they offered Tai Chi as a college major nowadays! I don't like to spread myself too thin style wise. MMA is cool, and you've probably heard it before but I feel like it is taking some of the magic out of studying martial arts. Meh.

Also a reiki master level healer/teacher, ran the student group for energy healing practice at my university for two years, fairly well psychic, and that all applies to being able to sense the energy centers of the person in front of me and read their movements/find the spots that will hurt etcetera.

Also, very cool stuff. I'd be wary about Reiki as a New Age trend. Most of them know more about manipulating your emotions (to pay them cash) than they know about manipulating your energy centers! Just make sure to check your teachers qualifications! One of the few people I've had first hand, real life experience studying with (who has proven himself to the community quite well in my opinion) was Grandmaster Angi Uezu... And that man. I will just leave it at that haha, you can see for yourself what he is capable of.


Push hands, sticky hands, "sensing hands," it's a great practice.

The other week I was doing it with a friend where we could use a reasonable amount of purely muscular force (as opposed to minimal) and didn't need to stay in one spot. We could step around however we liked, and it was really good. He's very skillful, but I found myself making hand-torso placements to indicate hits more than would have been fully advantageous to manipulation of his center mass. Both are applicable.

It's like chess in three dimensions, in real time, and with force.

Yes, that is a nice way of putting it :D. Be careful out there mate!

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Response to Martial Arts Club 2014-11-13 22:53:08 Reply

At 11/13/14 01:17 PM, frootza wrote:
At 11/13/14 03:51 AM, Lagerkapo wrote: Which form/school of Tai Chi did/do you study? They are all similar but very different. I went to college for shortened Lee form (Chen Man Chin's adaptation) and in high school I believe I did a Wu variation, although I can't remember.
I believe I was studying Chen's as well, though I could be wrong. Don't take my word for it though since it was a very long time ago and I really only remember the most basic "phrase", stepping to the left, looking to the left along with the various visualizations, (which I believe are taught wrong most of the time anyway based on my Qi Gong experience. If you think lo ma bu was bad, wait until you get into the more intense postures while "standing" on bricks!)

So.. I studied under Chen Man Ching's direct lineage holder, and we never were prompted to visualize anything during a Tai Chi form practice, simply to most fully as possible be in our bodies.

Stepping and turning one's head to the left was not the first move of my form. The attention rarely, only twice, (attention being where the head turns) moves away from the orientation of the centerline of the torso, dan tien and body as a whole.

The first move was to move from (I don't remember what it's called, but I called it) duck feet (feet connected at the ankles and splayed at 45 degrees) onto the right foot by ***releasing the hips, falling into it and catching it all in a very controlled manner***, place the left foot at shoulder width facing forward as the weight shifts, using the fulcrum action of the hips, shift weight onto the left leg, and use the hips to reorient the right foot to be at shoulder width both feet facing forward.

Then it was dropping the hips and lower back in order to allow the raising of the arms at one of three points in the form where the wrists really bent, but the raising of the arms comes from the core. The arms raised to shoulder level as you simultaneously sunk and rose and finally you ended up ready to begin using lateral motion with your shoulders.

Well, blocking a trained (and moreover skillful) boxer is hardly a breeze, but it definitely allows one greater alacrity when trying to redirect force.
Trained boxers in my experience think they are (for lack of a better term) "hot shit", but they bounce around too much and want to show off looking like Ali, getting floored with a simple leg swoop.

Be honest, how many really good boxers have you actually met, let alone thrown blows with? And have you ever played with world class boxing men? I know I haven't, and the decent ones are, sure, easier than people trained in other forms of combat to kick, choke and bend, and easier means that I ONLY have to overcome physical strength, as opposed to ably used leverage and ability, but they still have a very good fighting ability, especially at close and mid range, and should not be taken lightly.

The radius of the method I practice covers their entire attack radius but does take more speed and power than with the usual training wheels. In a ring it's pretty useful but not in a bar! (In my opinion/experience)

Have you had to apply either? (Fought in a ring or in bar/street)


Cool stuff! I had no idea they offered Tai Chi as a college major nowadays! I don't like to spread myself too thin style wise. MMA is cool, and you've probably heard it before but I feel like it is taking some of the magic out of studying martial arts. Meh.

Haha if you want mystique then you shouldn't be training for a fight. MMA is a blanket term. Every school is different. I studied at a school where the master largely used "Pancrase" (Kind of like a greek freeform thing revived in the modern age in spirit) as the name for his school, but it incorporated Sambo (Russian submission wrestling), BJJ, Boxing, Kickboxing, Muay Thai etcetera whatever and all sorts of other shit. We did a lot of free sparring too, which I find often to be paramount to the ability to really incorporate the principles of any given form, school of thought or idea about combat. Not to say that anything is anything; the martial arts are about understanding the principles of the mechanics of the body and the violent and/or controllable application of force. Period.


Also a reiki master level healer/teacher, ran the student group for energy healing practice at my university for two years, fairly well psychic, and that all applies to being able to sense the energy centers of the person in front of me and read their movements/find the spots that will hurt etcetera.
Also, very cool stuff. I'd be wary about Reiki as a New Age trend. Most of them know more about manipulating your emotions (to pay them cash) than they know about manipulating your energy centers! Just make sure to check your teachers qualifications!

I do not disrespect your skepticism, but I have had quite a bit of serious energetic experience and training in this lifetime, and I am very skilled at what I do. I have, obviously, like everybody, had to go through some stupid bullshit to gain my confidence, but I know pretty thoroughly and exactly what it is that I am doing with my energy. And Reiki, although it is a valuable and free tool in my spiritual toolbox is simply one mechanism through which I can work.

I appreciate your sentiment, and hold no resentment, but I will tell you that I HAVE learned not only what salt is but why it is granular. And then some. Energy is not an illusion to me, it is a reality and I am very thoroughly grounded when it comes to how I go about experiencing it, at least in relation to the level of warning you sought to provide me.

I never charge money for my services
One of the few people I've had first hand, real life experience studying with (who has proven himself to the community quite well in my opinion) was Grandmaster Angi Uezu... And that man. I will just leave it at that haha, you can see for yourself what he is capable of.

I will research him.

It's like chess in three dimensions, in real time, and with force.
Yes, that is a nice way of putting it :D. Be careful out there mate!

Always and without exception or fail.


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Response to Martial Arts Club 2014-11-14 14:21:04 Reply

At 11/13/14 10:53 PM, Lagerkapo wrote:
At 11/13/14 01:17 PM, frootza wrote:
At 11/13/14 03:51 AM, Lagerkapo wrote:
So.. I studied under Chen Man Ching's direct lineage holder, and we never were prompted to visualize anything during a Tai Chi form practice, simply to most fully as possible be in our bodies.

Stepping and turning one's head to the left was not the first move of my form. The attention rarely, only twice, (attention being where the head turns) moves away from the orientation of the centerline of the torso, dan tien and body as a whole.

It's a shame, but even if he is the direct lineage holder, it still doesn't mean he understands how to visualize properly. There are certain things that are kept secret for a reason. The visualizations make the postures much more difficult. But you should know what school I'm referring to with this initial movement anyway since it's quite popular.



Well, blocking a trained (and moreover skillful) boxer is hardly a breeze, but it definitely allows one greater alacrity when trying to redirect force.
Trained boxers in my experience think they are (for lack of a better term) "hot shit", but they bounce around too much and want to show off looking like Ali, getting floored with a simple leg swoop.
Be honest, how many really good boxers have you actually met, let alone thrown blows with? And have you ever played with world class boxing men? I know I haven't, and the decent ones are, sure, easier than people trained in other forms of combat to kick, choke and bend, and easier means that I ONLY have to overcome physical strength, as opposed to ably used leverage and ability, but they still have a very good fighting ability, especially at close and mid range, and should not be taken lightly.

The radius of the method I practice covers their entire attack radius but does take more speed and power than with the usual training wheels. In a ring it's pretty useful but not in a bar! (In my opinion/experience)
Have you had to apply either? (Fought in a ring or in bar/street)

I mentioned it because, I actually have. If I haven't done it, I wouldn't have mentioned it in the manner I did. And as far as boxing, I've met and fought with quite a few boxers (who train frequently, despite my lack of steady training). Heading to bars and having a steady job in Newark, you are pretty much guaranteed to run into a few tough guys. I've never fought in a ring, but dojos, bars, "streets", and even hospitals, sure. World class? Not exactly, but I'm on good terms with a boxer who was on the road to world class boxing before breaking his hand. He's a great boxer but not someone who I would ever fear fighting. He had some amazing speed and control, and would always fuck with people by fake punching them right next to their face. Until he tried that one on me ;)

This being said, my grandfather was a brilliant boxer, unfortunately I never had the chance to meet him personally.

Haha if you want mystique then you shouldn't be training for a fight.

I don't want mystique, and I don't even train for fights. Haven't actually had to do much training, but it's probably in my blood. If I wanted Mystique I would watch one of the X-Men movies or head to comic con :P. But on a more serious note, it seems like you are oversimplifying things here. I'll stick to my story in saying that the blanket term MMA isn't superior because it "tries" to combine the methods of various styles into one super style. I just don't think it works l like that. Maybe give it a couple hundred years to evolve into something more concrete and I might consider it a true art form.

I do not disrespect your skepticism, but I have had quite a bit of serious energetic experience and training in this lifetime, and I am very skilled at what I do. I have, obviously, like everybody, had to go through some stupid bullshit to gain my confidence, but I know pretty thoroughly and exactly what it is that I am doing with my energy. And Reiki, although it is a valuable and free tool in my spiritual toolbox is simply one mechanism through which I can work.

Now that, is mystique! I've had experience in this field as well, but prefer not to discuss this sort of thing at any level online if I can avoid it.


I appreciate your sentiment, and hold no resentment, but I will tell you that I HAVE learned not only what salt is but why it is granular. And then some. Energy is not an illusion to me, it is a reality and I am very thoroughly grounded when it comes to how I go about experiencing it, at least in relation to the level of warning you sought to provide me.

Have you been thrown through a wall via Qi Projection yet? Honestly of course. When you have, or when you are able of doing so yourself, let me know :)


Grandmaster Angi Uezu
I will research him.

Go for it!

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Response to Martial Arts Club 2014-11-14 14:52:25 Reply

At 11/14/14 02:21 PM, frootza wrote:
At 11/13/14 10:53 PM, Lagerkapo wrote:
At 11/13/14 01:17 PM, frootza wrote:
At 11/13/14 03:51 AM, Lagerkapo wrote:
So.. I studied under Chen Man Ching's direct lineage holder, and we never were prompted to visualize anything during a Tai Chi form practice, simply to most fully as possible be in our bodies.

Stepping and turning one's head to the left was not the first move of my form. The attention rarely, only twice, (attention being where the head turns) moves away from the orientation of the centerline of the torso, dan tien and body as a whole.
It's a shame, but even if he is the direct lineage holder, it still doesn't mean he understands how to visualize properly. There are certain things that are kept secret for a reason. The visualizations make the postures much more difficult. But you should know what school I'm referring to with this initial movement anyway since it's quite popular.

I don't know which school.

I don't feel like defending or validating my experience, so I won't.


Have you had to apply either? (Fought in a ring or in bar/street)
I mentioned it because, I actually have. If I haven't done it, I wouldn't have mentioned it in the manner I did. And as far as boxing, I've met and fought with quite a few boxers (who train frequently, despite my lack of steady training). Heading to bars and having a steady job in Newark, you are pretty much guaranteed to run into a few tough guys. I've never fought in a ring, but dojos, bars, "streets", and even hospitals, sure. World class? Not exactly, but I'm on good terms with a boxer who was on the road to world class boxing before breaking his hand. He's a great boxer but not someone who I would ever fear fighting. He had some amazing speed and control, and would always fuck with people by fake punching them right next to their face. Until he tried that one on me ;)

Well at least you have some experience in that then. I've met lots of people who say they can take on boxers "easily" just because they've trained some kicks or grabs, but they're usually delusional.

Haha if you want mystique then you shouldn't be training for a fight.
I don't want mystique, and I don't even train for fights. Haven't actually had to do much training, but it's probably in my blood. If I wanted Mystique I would watch one of the X-Men movies or head to comic con :P. But on a more serious note, it seems like you are oversimplifying things here. I'll stick to my story in saying that the blanket term MMA isn't superior because it "tries" to combine the methods of various styles into one super style. I just don't think it works l like that. Maybe give it a couple hundred years to evolve into something more concrete and I might consider it a true art form.

Never tried to imply the superiority of MMA. It's cagefighting tactics with some holds and strikes barred.

I do not disrespect your skepticism, but I have had quite a bit of serious energetic experience and training in this lifetime, and I am very skilled at what I do. I have, obviously, like everybody, had to go through some stupid bullshit to gain my confidence, but I know pretty thoroughly and exactly what it is that I am doing with my energy. And Reiki, although it is a valuable and free tool in my spiritual toolbox is simply one mechanism through which I can work.
Now that, is mystique! I've had experience in this field as well, but prefer not to discuss this sort of thing at any level online if I can avoid it.

I remain aloof about details. Used to give a fuck but now it's whatever. I know how to use discretion.

Have you been thrown through a wall via Qi Projection yet? Honestly of course. When you have, or when you are able of doing so yourself, let me know :)

I watched my friend throw my other friend six feet back without touching him once. When he tried it on me I was able to ground it and disperse the energy without losing my footing.


Grandmaster Angi Uezu
I will research him.
Go for it!

:)

The martial arts conversation... The one that goes on for ever and fucking ever.


NGMartial Arts Club Are you Man...
MUSIC | or a little, dying cosmic whore...
Speak with your actions, come from your core.

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DoctorStrongbad
DoctorStrongbad
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Response to Martial Arts Club 2014-11-14 18:54:24 Reply

At 11/11/14 12:32 AM, DontComplain wrote: Someone should a real life fight club like the movie Fight Club. :D

They would need better excuses for all the bruises.


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