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Social Democracy in Denmark

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Kwing
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Social Democracy in Denmark Jan. 28th, 2013 @ 04:15 PM Reply

Denmark, Norway, and Sweden are doing something right if they consistently rank in the top happiest countries in the world. Tons of sources will agree on this, despite the fact that all three of them operate under social democracy, which people in America are pretty horrified of.

I wanted to make a really short thread about this to try and keep the focus on social democracies and how well they seem to work in other countries. If leaning farther to the left is what works over there, what exactly are we hoping to fix by leaning farther to the right here? From a logical standpoint, shouldn't we be trying to imitate countries where people are happier?


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leanlifter1
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Response to Social Democracy in Denmark Jan. 28th, 2013 @ 04:24 PM Reply

People in America are to much into the illision of freedom. If people in America actualy had true unadulterated freedom they would be depressed with the amount of work life actually takes. Social safety nets and institutional systems are what people want even if they don't know it or want to admit it yet as it delegates responsibility's and work load across a substantially broader range of people enabling more quality of life and free time.


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Camarohusky
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Response to Social Democracy in Denmark Jan. 28th, 2013 @ 04:39 PM Reply

Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and Switzerland all have one VERY key thing in common.

They are all small.

Sweden is the largest of the three coming at a quite puny 9.5 million residents. 9-10 (depending on which counts used) US states are larger by themselves. Three US metro areas are larger by themselves.

This facilitates social democracy in numerous ways.

First, it's far easier to agree on something when you only have a small group of people.

Second, people are far more likely to give up parts of themselves to benefit their local community than the broader community. Many US states have fairly social governmental systems in places because a Washingtonian is far more willing to give up something for Washington than for Texas, or New York, or Tennessee.

One other thing these countries have in common is a relatively homogenous geography and people. When most people live similarly it;s very easy to see th benefits of providng uniform and communal support. In the US where different regions live very different lifestyles it becomes much more difficult to slap a one size fits all solution.

In the US these geographical differences over a couple cenuries have created strong cultural differences. In the Southeast you have a very religious, sedentary, and extremely individualist culture. In the Northwest you have a far less religious, very active, communal, and world conscious (annoyingly so) culture. Try getting these two regions to agree on something... I dare you.

orangebomb
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Response to Social Democracy in Denmark Jan. 28th, 2013 @ 10:49 PM Reply

At 1/28/13 04:15 PM, Kwing wrote: I wanted to make a really short thread about this to try and keep the focus on social democracies and how well they seem to work in other countries. If leaning farther to the left is what works over there, what exactly are we hoping to fix by leaning farther to the right here? From a logical standpoint, shouldn't we be trying to imitate countries where people are happier?

This is one of those things that I would put as "just because it works there, doesn't mean it'll work here." For one thing, they are not as populated as the U.S. is, so naturally it's going to be a smaller proportion of disillusioned people around than America. Also, they don't tend to think of themselves as individualist when it comes to social issues and the community as a whole, which means they are far more tight-knit as a nation because they all have similar ways of life and that they conform to.

What you probably thinking is why don't we do that here? Simply put, in a diverse country like America, from an ethnic and geographical point of view, it's almost impossible for everyone to agree as a collective, much less agree on whatever social issue or way of life is considered good. Naturally, you're going to have people who aren't going to be happy, due to the fact that there is something wrong with whatever, and they'll whine, piss and moan about it.

This is why socialist ideals can never work in America, in addition to extreme cost of implementing, {which we can't afford} the little details is where you would get a massive gap of disagreement between people in different regions. It's once in a blue moon that some Bible-thumping loser in Mississippi agree with some hipster atheist in Oregon when it comes to social policy, much less an acceptable way of life.


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