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strawberrymarie
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Creating a mood? 2012-05-06 14:43:12 Reply

I have no real music experience, but, Im learning C++ so i can create my own game, and am planning on doing every aspect of it myself--even music. How do you get music to sound as though its... for a desert, or for night time, or for a happy summer day, or for a sad scene. Thanks for any help, examples appreciated.

Rampant
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Response to Creating a mood? 2012-05-06 15:09:22 Reply

At 5/6/12 02:43 PM, strawberrymarie wrote: I have no real music experience, but, Im learning C++ so i can create my own game, and am planning on doing every aspect of it myself--even music. How do you get music to sound as though its... for a desert, or for night time, or for a happy summer day, or for a sad scene. Thanks for any help, examples appreciated.

For desert music, you could always go with the stereotypical "middle eastern scale" (an harmonic minor scale that revolves around the 1-and-a-half steps between the 7th and the tonic). To evoke nighttime, I'd use slow, lush pads or strings, in the minor mode, with "twinkly" sounding instruments (celestes, music boxes, xylophones, etc -- things that sound light). For summer music, major chords with a melody that jumps around (but not over the top). For sad scenes, slow strings, minor chords, and probably a piano line over it.

Example
Example
Example
Example

retrobox2
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Response to Creating a mood? 2012-05-06 15:34:57 Reply

Well all those feeling are created by two things: chords and scales. That is your base for the song feeling and it is going to develop the song entirely.

for example if you want a sad song you're going to use minor chords and if you want a happy song you can use mayor chords. That is the basic because it depends on what chord do you use because not all mayor are going to sound happy.
With the scales is almost the same if you want a happy one you can go with C major.

One of the most important thing on a song that you want to express a certain feeling is your chord progression if the progression doesn't sound like the feeling that you want is hard to change it.

Sorry for my bad english

NikeTheSword
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Response to Creating a mood? 2012-05-07 07:16:35 Reply

At 5/6/12 03:34 PM, retrobox2 wrote: Well all those feeling are created by two things: chords and scales.

But is the emotion tied exclusively on chords and scales (my musical deviant rises it's ugly head). Aside from that, stereotypical solutions are the best for you OP, just like Rampant first suggested.

I also suggest that you listen to game OSTs with clear themes (Portal - Very Scifi, Prince of Persia - Middle East, Monkey Island - Piratey 'arr, just to name a few). Depending also on your game setting, the mood is either more about the location or the plot advancement (Arcade game - depict the mood of the level overall, Storybased game - depict what's happening, example: character dying, danger approaching etc.

Damn, I made that sound very confusing, I hope you get something out of it :D


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Troisnyx
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Response to Creating a mood? 2012-05-07 08:51:03 Reply

At 5/7/12 07:16 AM, NikeTheSword wrote: But is the emotion tied exclusively on chords and scales (my musical deviant rises it's ugly head).

Not exclusively. You have a few things to play with: Chords and scales give different worldly interpretations. Tempo variation makes a happy piece a sad one, or a solemn piece a joyful one. Switching the key from major to minor can help change the general feeling -- if it's a joyful piece in major, it could be a serious, action-packed piece in minor, for example.

I hope this explanation helps.


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loansindi
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Response to Creating a mood? 2012-05-07 09:40:41 Reply

Don't forget the huge aspect that SFX plays in setting a mood. If you want to evoke desert imagery, more important than your music, I think, is that mournful sound of the wind we've been taught to associate with a desert.

retrobox2
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Response to Creating a mood? 2012-05-07 19:36:02 Reply

Of course there are many variations but I just put the basic one. There are tons of way and I know that it sound a little bit a mechanic way of composing but is just that there isn't a certain way of doing you just got to feel it, I just tried to write it down. Like everyone said there a lot of things that you can tweak to have some fun. For example if you use a strange scale you can get lots of sounds from it and if you do a melody that sound scary when you add another instrument you can achieve something different.

Those are the fun parts about composing!

NikeTheSword
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Response to Creating a mood? 2012-05-08 02:05:19 Reply

At 5/7/12 07:36 PM, retrobox2 wrote: Of course there are many variations but I just put the basic one. There are tons of way and I know that it sound a little bit a mechanic way of composing but is just that there isn't a certain way of doing you just got to feel it, I just tried to write it down. Like everyone said there a lot of things that you can tweak to have some fun. For example if you use a strange scale you can get lots of sounds from it and if you do a melody that sound scary when you add another instrument you can achieve something different.

Those are the fun parts about composing!

I wasn't trying to bash you mate. It just piqued my interest as there are many in the composing scene that believe zealously that every single note should be there only and only to fullfil it's role according to the basic rules of music. And that everything else is just noise and not music.
Ironically, noise and experimental music is their world's greatest evil :p

What you said holds up as a good guideline to new composers, I totally agree with you.


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retrobox2
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Response to Creating a mood? 2012-05-08 20:10:29 Reply

At 5/8/12 02:05 AM, NikeTheSword wrote: I wasn't trying to bash you mate. It just piqued my interest as there are many in the composing scene that believe zealously that every single note should be there only and only to fullfil it's role according to the basic rules of music. And that everything else is just noise and not music.
Ironically, noise and experimental music is their world's greatest evil :p

What you said holds up as a good guideline to new composers, I totally agree with you.

I'm not sure what bash means but if you mean that you weren't insulting me, I knew it is just that my english sucks and the way that I wrote sound like I was defending my self. What I was doing is just adding more information because I kind of let it incomplete.

I totally agree with you, composing is something that humans been for thousands and thousands of years ago and they did it without any rule. Is something that comes so natural you just feel it. The experimental music is just something so innovator and I hate when people say I classical music is the only good music and everything else is shit. Why don't you enjoy both? And don't get me wrong I love classical music and at the same time I just enjoy the many ways that people are reinventing the music.