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Frazmaster
Frazmaster
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synthescissors 2011-01-01 01:03:45 Reply

I was looking at getting a keyboard in order to make the music writing process a little easier and the idea of buying a synthesizer popped into my head.

I wanted to ask:

What kind of advantages do hardware synthesizers have over software ones. Keeping in mind that I have under $1000 to spend (which, in terms of synths, I know, isn't a lot)?

SpaceWhale
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Response to synthescissors 2011-01-01 01:06:36 Reply

IMO, there isn't really any advantage to having a hardware synth. You can't automate the parameters, it's bulky, and they cost a lot of money. Just download a synth from KVR.


Can you feel it mister Krabs?

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matvei
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Response to synthescissors 2011-01-01 02:00:24 Reply

At 1/1/11 01:03 AM, Frazmaster wrote: I was looking at getting a keyboard in order to make the music writing process a little easier and the idea of buying a synthesizer popped into my head.

I wanted to ask:

What kind of advantages do hardware synthesizers have over software ones. Keeping in mind that I have under $1000 to spend (which, in terms of synths, I know, isn't a lot)?

If you are torn between these, then what I would suggest is starting with a keyboard midi controller - such as an akai mpk25 or mpk 49, or anything anyone else can recommend. Or if you want something that has some standalone sounds then get a personal keyboard (like a 250-350 dollar yamaha keyboard). that way you can use a midi to usb interface to use it with software synth programs etc etc.

Then if you fall in love with a hardware synth later, you might be able to by the brain of it as a hardware module and just hook your already comfortable controller into it. Since I use wind synth and keyboard synth, I use a combo of software (for the variety) and hardware (for the dependability and compatibility with breath controllers and other weird midi things).

Also, if you are just using it for written composition or playing around, you don't have to commit to something with all the bells and whistles that a synth has right away.

In short - my opinion:
Keyboard Midi controller: Pro: easy to use with software synth, affordability
Con: no built in sounds

Personal Keyboard: Pro: good to use as standalone playing keyboard with decent sounds
Con: limited use as a controller for hardware or soft synth

Hardware synth (moog, etc.): Pro: works well as a controller and has sounds for easy playability.
Con: sometimes can be expensive for good extras. You have to shop around for the one you want to commit to.

Also, Synthescissors:

synthescissors


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Frazmaster
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Response to synthescissors 2011-01-01 02:54:37 Reply

lols, great posts. thanks a lot :)

joshhunsaker
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Response to synthescissors 2011-01-02 12:41:05 Reply

yea, I find with synthescissors you can really cut some great stuff together

Buoy
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Response to synthescissors 2011-01-02 14:15:54 Reply

just use the cut and paste operations in your daw

Morphone
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Response to synthescissors 2011-01-02 16:26:24 Reply

You might be interested in the MachineDrum by Electron. It's not a synthesizer, but it's one hell of a drum machine and partial rompler/partial synthesizer.


Check out Morphone music on my page and on Youtube. All varieties of music here.

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