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ocean7
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Questions about mastering... Mar. 19th, 2010 @ 05:45 PM Reply

I'm interested in getting some of my tracks mastered, and I'm aware that when you send a track to be mastered, it should have tracks for each instrument. But I've got into what could be a really bad habit, of using compressors on my master channel which seems to make the different instruments blend together and give gives a much nicer sound. However, in the case of FL, when you export the mixer channels as separate tracks, the effect of the compression of one instrument affecting another is lost.

For example, if you have a constant saw wave, and a kick beat, each sent to a different mixer channel, then sent through a compressor on the master, you can achieve a sound similar to side chaining, and when this is applied to full tracks, mixed accordingly so that the louder tracks don't drown out the quieter ones, this can sound very good. But then, when you come to export the track as separate mixer tracks, any affect from the compressor is lost, as the separate tracks are each exported as if no other channel was active.

So the question is, is there a way around this, or have I been wasting my time with this technique?

Also on the subject of mastering, I heard that each track is supposed to have any automation and panning removed. If this is the case, how will a mastering engineer know when to recreate these effects? Surely that can't be true?

Any information or views on this would be highly appreciated.

Thanks.

Mystery-Moon-Pie-Aud
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Response to Questions about mastering... Mar. 19th, 2010 @ 06:03 PM Reply

At 3/19/10 05:45 PM, ocean7 wrote: I'm interested in getting some of my tracks mastered, and I'm aware that when you send a track to be mastered, it should have tracks for each instrument. But I've got into what could be a really bad habit, of using compressors on my master channel which seems to make the different instruments blend together and give gives a much nicer sound. However, in the case of FL, when you export the mixer channels as separate tracks, the effect of the compression of one instrument affecting another is lost.

For example, if you have a constant saw wave, and a kick beat, each sent to a different mixer channel, then sent through a compressor on the master, you can achieve a sound similar to side chaining, and when this is applied to full tracks, mixed accordingly so that the louder tracks don't drown out the quieter ones, this can sound very good. But then, when you come to export the track as separate mixer tracks, any affect from the compressor is lost, as the separate tracks are each exported as if no other channel was active.

So the question is, is there a way around this, or have I been wasting my time with this technique?

Also on the subject of mastering, I heard that each track is supposed to have any automation and panning removed. If this is the case, how will a mastering engineer know when to recreate these effects? Surely that can't be true?

Any information or views on this would be highly appreciated.

Thanks.

I don't know much about mastering, but when you separate the tracks, just mute all the tracks except the one you are exporting, thereby the song playing how you want to play it except with only the track required. Then effects and everything will be okay as you want them to sound. I don't know about panning and automations, but it doesn't sound like a bad idea to remove panning. But they might just master it in mono at the start, so it might not even matter.


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xKore
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Response to Questions about mastering... Mar. 19th, 2010 @ 06:07 PM Reply

you would have to send your song as seperate tracks if you were sending it to a mixing engineer. general mastering only requires a master copy.

and no, you dont have to remove panning of automation

DavidOrr
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Response to Questions about mastering... Mar. 19th, 2010 @ 06:23 PM Reply

At 3/19/10 06:03 PM, Mystery-Moon-Pie-Aud wrote:
I don't know much about mastering, but when you separate the tracks, just mute all the tracks except the one you are exporting, thereby the song playing how you want to play it except with only the track required. Then effects and everything will be okay as you want them to sound. I don't know about panning and automations, but it doesn't sound like a bad idea to remove panning. But they might just master it in mono at the start, so it might not even matter.

Unfortunately this wouldn't give you the same end result- since the compressor will affect the single channel differently than if it was compressing the whole track (try it if you don't believe me- you'll probably get some clipping when you put everything back together).

Regardless, someone whoever is doing the mastering will probably want the track uncompressed. Compression is really the job of the masterer - he'll take care of the compression work for you.


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Mystery-Moon-Pie-Aud
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Response to Questions about mastering... Mar. 19th, 2010 @ 06:32 PM Reply

Unfortunately this wouldn't give you the same end result- since the compressor will affect the single channel differently than if it was compressing the whole track (try it if you don't believe me- you'll probably get some clipping when you put everything back together).

Regardless, someone whoever is doing the mastering will probably want the track uncompressed. Compression is really the job of the masterer - he'll take care of the compression work for you.

Yeah, now that I think of it, when the master engineer changes the levels, they won't be the same. So it is a good idea to remove compressors.


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Mrmilkcarton
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Response to Questions about mastering... Mar. 19th, 2010 @ 07:02 PM Reply

The fact that you need a compressor for your song means the mastering engineer will already be a bit ticked off. You want to leave 'headroom' for mastering say 3dBs of sound worth. This way the engineer can bring up the song to it's full potential.

In all honesty though, a mastering engineer really doesn't make a huge difference on a well mixed song. So you best get learning some good production skills.

Rucklo
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Response to Questions about mastering... Mar. 19th, 2010 @ 07:59 PM Reply

you won't get sidechaining-effects, simply because when the compressor connected the way you describe will work on the stereo-channel out. This mean that at a certain set threshold it's gonna start compress i.e. lower the volume at a certain set ratio (threshold and ratio you set yourself), and that's it. there are compressors that have auto-gain etc. so that you'll get a different feeling depending on the material that you're compressing, but that's it.

i made a compression tutorial a few years back, it might help you understand better what compressors actually do, and how they work; http://www.newgrounds.com/bbs/topic/7188 86


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