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Epic Orchestral Music

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Krank
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Epic Orchestral Music 2009-02-20 16:16:20 Reply

There are a boatload of classical musicians here on newgrounds, I am a relative latecomer in this area, only ever having produced one or two orchestral songs.

Now I approach this genre, which is relatively new to me.

I want to first and foremost get that authentic rich thick professional orchestral sound digitally. The best way to do this is to listen to a thick rich song and try to emulate that sound.

I got the pirates of the Caribbean theme, some david orr, but I must say, I don't know many artists from this genre or peices in it.

In this thread, put some links to orchestral epicness. Not only me, but everyone here will get some good examples, not only for composition,but mainly for that rich thick sound. real orchestras or synthesized orchestra's are fine.

Post some videos of some thick, rich epic orchestral music, youtube links are fine.

Kaizerwolf
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Response to Epic Orchestral Music 2009-02-20 16:20:59 Reply

Look through some of nubbinownz' stuff. Most of his songs nowadays are Orchestral DnB, and nub is an expert when it comes to Orchestral in my opinion. Try NemesisTheory as well. Rose At Nightfall and Rose At Twilight both have a mixture of DnB and Orchestra.


How about you join the NGPD? Just what is the Newgrounds Police Dept.? Click the link and find out for yourself!

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IKONiC
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Response to Epic Orchestral Music 2009-02-20 16:44:04 Reply

Look up some Nightwish and try to copy their writing style. Very epic. You could also try asking Maestro Rage and Draqo and few tips. Get on AIM tonight and I'll help you out some more. I know which VSTs you need.


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blackattackbitch
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Response to Epic Orchestral Music 2009-02-20 16:45:31 Reply

Check out the following artists:

Paradoxphenomena
Danman87
Maestrorage (no brainer)
Zero123music (He's more piano, but he does have some epic stuff)
Intero
Blacknote
Masterjiji (he does some amazing stuff with garageband)
And last but not least, ME!!!!! Well, at least my latest song. But if you want Epic, check out the one song in my sig called Revolution.

blackattackbitch
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Response to Epic Orchestral Music 2009-02-20 16:55:13 Reply

Sorry for the double post, and sorry for the above post if it sounds like an advert, but I figured I'd help in a better way.

Two sites you wanna check out for orchestral sounds

http://Sf2midi.com
http://www.papelmedia.de/english/downloa d2.htm

Or you could shell out some cash and buy edirol orchestral, miroslav philharmonik, east-west, or god-forbid vienna symphonic library.

SolusLunes
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Response to Epic Orchestral Music 2009-02-20 16:58:03 Reply

Vidja Game Music!

Chrono Symphonic

Relics of The Chozo

And of course, I'd recommend finding yourself a copy of the Ace Combat 5 soundtrack.

For tracks like The Unsung War, Dead Ahead, or one of my favorites, Closure. The soundtrack to Ace Combat Zero is also extremely impressive, with songs like Zero, though the soundtrack has a more Spanish feel to it than 5. Ace Combat 4 also has the song Megalith (Agnus Dei), and that is epic awesome embodied.

This series alone is why I respect Tetsukazu Nakanishi and Keiki Kobayashi more than Nobuo Uematsu for awesome music. :D

Jebbal
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Response to Epic Orchestral Music 2009-02-20 17:02:48 Reply

Here's a fantastic example! It was made using East West Symphonic Platinum Plus

"Action Adventure"


| Facebook | MAC | NAC | RAC | Gamertag - SeamonkeY372 | I provide graphics! PM

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madanchi
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Response to Epic Orchestral Music 2009-04-06 15:45:14 Reply

hey, heres youtube link, ignore the pic like lol but its got a very good epic orchestrall piece : )

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GMYXLg7Yk _U

sorohanro
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Response to Epic Orchestral Music 2009-04-06 17:26:46 Reply

If you want to learn, sure, you can look over some good composers here, on NG, but would be better to look also to some people who made it up to the "real deal".
Some of my favorite composers put their music for free download on their sites:
Olivier Deriviere
Composer of soundtracks of:
- Alone in the Dark
- Obscure
- Obscure 2: the Aftermath
- short movie"La Tartine"
- Harry's Day solo album
Those with links he put for free downloads, some are with sampled orchestra and children choir fromOpera of Paris , some are with Boston Quartet.

Another good composer is Bill Brown, who made music for many games like "Command and Conquer""Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six", "Clive Barker's Undying" and also the music for Windows (which is with real orchestra and choir...).
I strongly recomend music from Undying.

Dimoria
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Response to Epic Orchestral Music 2009-04-06 20:11:35 Reply

Check out my songs called.

Unforgotten Hero

No Universe

They are both made with East West Quantum Leap Symphonic Orchestra Gold and silver edition.

sorohanro
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Response to Epic Orchestral Music 2009-04-06 20:33:41 Reply

At 4/6/09 08:21 PM, Dj-Svenzo wrote: Maestrorage is the only link you need

no... not really...
As much as I love him, there are a lot of really awesome musicians on NG and out of NG.
Listening just one, as good as he an be, would just make your horizon smaller.

wyldfyre1
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Response to Epic Orchestral Music 2009-04-06 21:15:14 Reply

This is all i have to say about this topic.

BrokenDeck
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Response to Epic Orchestral Music 2009-04-06 21:42:00 Reply

You should really look up the following Hollywood composers...

Maurice Jarre ex. Ghost, Dr. Zhivago
Fred Steiner ex. Gone with the Wind
Bill Conti ex. Karate Kid, Rocky
Henry Mancini ex. The Good, The Bad, The Ugly
John Williams ex. Olympic Fanfare, news, Star Wars, Jaws, The Cowboys, The Patriot, many more....
James Horner ex. Titanic, Glory, Braveheart, Star Trek
Jerry Goldsmith, ex. Star Trek, Total Recall, The Wind and the Lion
Alan Silvestri ex. Contact, Forrest Gump
James Newton Howard ex. Waterworld, Dinosaur
Basil Poledouris ex. Hunt for Red October
Vangelis ex. Chariots of Fire 1492
Danny Elfman ex. Batman, Spiderman
Howard Shore ex. LOTR, Mrs. Doubtfire, The Fly (I think)
Randy Edelman ex. Gettysburg, Dragonheart
Joe Hisaishi ex. Princess Mononoke
David Arnold ex. Stargate, ID4, James Bond
Don Davis ex. Matrix
Michael Kamen ex. Robin Hood Prince of Theives, Highlander
Thomas Newman ex. Shawshank Redemption
Trevor Jones ex. Dark City, Last of the Mohicans
Elliot Goldenthal
Eric Serra

Nekoprism
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Response to Epic Orchestral Music 2009-04-06 22:30:11 Reply

At 4/6/09 09:42 PM, brokendeck wrote: You should really look up the following Hollywood composers...

Maurice Jarre ex. Ghost, Dr. Zhivago
Fred Steiner ex. Gone with the Wind
Bill Conti ex. Karate Kid, Rocky
Henry Mancini ex. The Good, The Bad, The Ugly
John Williams ex. Olympic Fanfare, news, Star Wars, Jaws, The Cowboys, The Patriot, many more....
James Horner ex. Titanic, Glory, Braveheart, Star Trek
Jerry Goldsmith, ex. Star Trek, Total Recall, The Wind and the Lion
Alan Silvestri ex. Contact, Forrest Gump
James Newton Howard ex. Waterworld, Dinosaur
Basil Poledouris ex. Hunt for Red October
Vangelis ex. Chariots of Fire 1492
Danny Elfman ex. Batman, Spiderman
Howard Shore ex. LOTR, Mrs. Doubtfire, The Fly (I think)
Randy Edelman ex. Gettysburg, Dragonheart
Joe Hisaishi ex. Princess Mononoke
David Arnold ex. Stargate, ID4, James Bond
Don Davis ex. Matrix
Michael Kamen ex. Robin Hood Prince of Theives, Highlander
Thomas Newman ex. Shawshank Redemption
Trevor Jones ex. Dark City, Last of the Mohicans
Elliot Goldenthal
Eric Serra

Don't forget my favorite! Hans Zimmer! He also has some great ones!

My problem with epic music is that it often involves choirs and even if I legally own the awesome Voices of the Apocalypse samples... I can'T acheive anything realistic enough to be great.


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WritersBlock
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Response to Epic Orchestral Music 2009-04-06 22:32:27 Reply

I am ashamed in you's audio forum guys!
You forgot Nick Perrin.

Also, I'm trying to compose some film score type stuff at the moment, and I'm going to try to sync it up with a movie sequence (like a scene from LotR or 300 or something like that).


READ: "A Fear of Great Heights" and other forthcoming adventures right HERE
Signature Picture by: Spartan204

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Mrmilkcarton
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Response to Epic Orchestral Music 2009-04-06 22:44:55 Reply

Youtube playlist of Immediate music (Epic commericial music)

Always liked that kind of stuff.

BrokenDeck
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Response to Epic Orchestral Music 2009-04-06 23:03:35 Reply

At 4/6/09 10:30 PM, Nekoprism wrote:
Don't forget my favorite! Hans Zimmer! He also has some great ones!

I knew there was one I forgot somewhere in there.....

Gravey
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Response to Epic Orchestral Music 2009-04-06 23:15:25 Reply

Enjoy...

  • The Journey Within
    The Journey Within by Gravey1

    Click to listen.

    Score
    4.06 / 5.00
    Type
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    Genre
    Classical
    Popularity
    369 Views

Make sure to listen to the whole thing. ;-)

-Gravey-


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YouriX
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Response to Epic Orchestral Music 2009-04-07 04:36:38 Reply

WOwowo guys would it be better to give away some FLstuido files. SO he can study from it?
Just a hint ;)

DavidOrr
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Response to Epic Orchestral Music 2009-04-07 08:37:40 Reply

The key to epic orchetral music is to have driving percussion (and lots of it), along with a very pronounced melody. Whenever I write something I want to sound big and epic, I almost always double the melody in octaves throughout the orchestra. Violins may have the melody, and violas may double the melody an octave lower. Or maybe horns will double the melody an octave or two down. A counter melody is nice, but only add one after you're sure the main melody is in the forefront. As a side note, strings make very good percussive instruments. They can be used to help the percussion drive a piece forward.

The second thing you want to be aware of is the chord progressions. Keep them simple, and try (as much as possible) to keep everything in root position. This means that the double basses will always be playing the root of each chord. This will keep the progression feeling rock solid and powerful. Once you start putting in inversions of chords the foundation of the piece will begin to become weakened, as inversions tend to be less stable sounding than root position chords.

For some music to check out, you could have al listen to Metal Gear Solid music, (pay attention to the last couple of minutes). Also, if you're using Hans Zimmer as a model, I'd go back and take a look at Gladiator, Lion King, and Rain Main. Although the later two aren't the most epic of sound tracks, they do have some pretty powerful moments in them. Some of the World of Warcraft music would also be worth a listen. This piece is a good example of the strings driving the music. Without the strings, the music would be bland and would drag on.

I'll probably jump back here if I can think of anything else, but I consider those points to be the most important. There are plenty of better music examples than my works here on Newgrounds, but I'm honored you're using my music as a model!


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Gravey
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Response to Epic Orchestral Music 2009-04-07 09:28:25 Reply

At 2/20/09 04:45 PM, blackattackbitch wrote: Check out the following artists:

Paradoxphenomena
Danman87
Maestrorage (no brainer)
Zero123music (He's more piano, but he does have some epic stuff)
Intero
Blacknote
Masterjiji (he does some amazing stuff with garageband)
And last but not least, ME!!!!! Well, at least my latest song. But if you want Epic, check out the one song in my sig called Revolution.

Aaaaaaaawwwww.....I didn't make the list. *TEAR*

*Kicks dirt and walks away in a degenerate manner*

-Gravey-


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HalcyonicFalconX
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Response to Epic Orchestral Music 2009-04-07 10:08:09 Reply

At 4/7/09 08:37 AM, DavidOrr wrote: The key to epic orchetral music is to have driving percussion (and lots of it), along with a very pronounced melody. Whenever I write something I want to sound big and epic, I almost always double the melody in octaves throughout the orchestra. Violins may have the melody, and violas may double the melody an octave lower. Or maybe horns will double the melody an octave or two down. A counter melody is nice, but only add one after you're sure the main melody is in the forefront. As a side note, strings make very good percussive instruments. They can be used to help the percussion drive a piece forward.

Agreed on this. Even traditional Classical composers did this, having various sections of the orchestra play the same melody at different octaves. However, one thing that gives orchestral music more depth that just a powerful "OOMPH" is having the middle voices also fill in the other notes in the chords (e.g. third, fifth, etc...)

The second thing you want to be aware of is the chord progressions. Keep them simple, and try (as much as possible) to keep everything in root position. This means that the double basses will always be playing the root of each chord. This will keep the progression feeling rock solid and powerful. Once you start putting in inversions of chords the foundation of the piece will begin to become weakened, as inversions tend to be less stable sounding than root position chords.

I actually disagree with this one. Keeping everything in root position works, but only if that's the feel you're trying to get for your song. Say you're working with choirs. I think it works better when you start off in the root position and use various inversions on the following chords. This way, your chords won't just go up and down with their roots, but they can move up or down in pitch as you like. And this can be useful in producing a counterpoint to your main melody, especially if your main melody is (as previously stated above) so well fortified and presented so strongly. In addition, a strong melody with a strong harmonic counterpoint sounds much "larger" and fuller.

For some music to check out, you could have al listen to Metal Gear Solid music, (pay attention to the last couple of minutes). Also, if you're using Hans Zimmer as a model, I'd go back and take a look at Gladiator, Lion King, and Rain Main. Although the later two aren't the most epic of sound tracks, they do have some pretty powerful moments in them. Some of the World of Warcraft music would also be worth a listen. This piece is a good example of the strings driving the music. Without the strings, the music would be bland and would drag on.

Strings are a crucial element. In your orchestra they are the most plentiful. That's because they're needed to fill the background, yet at the same time present the melody too. In an orchestra, you've got lots of strings at your disposal. Make use of them.

I'll probably jump back here if I can think of anything else, but I consider those points to be the most important. There are plenty of better music examples than my works here on Newgrounds, but I'm honored you're using my music as a model!

I'm not surprised David, you have really good orchestrals. Especially in the genre of orchestral that you work with.

Danman87
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Response to Epic Orchestral Music 2009-04-07 11:00:30 Reply

Well, Pirates is more like an orchestra that's pluged into an amplifier. I don't deny that I like it though. Most epic tracks have a progression that is rather simple, for some more sophisticated epic orchestral music check out John Debney's score to Lair or just John Debney in general.


Denny Schneidemesser, composer for Film & Media. www.dennyschneidemesser.com

DavidOrr
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Response to Epic Orchestral Music 2009-04-07 13:00:11 Reply

At 4/7/09 10:08 AM, HalcyonicFalconX wrote:
I actually disagree with this one. Keeping everything in root position works, but only if that's the feel you're trying to get for your song. Say you're working with choirs. I think it works better when you start off in the root position and use various inversions on the following chords. This way, your chords won't just go up and down with their roots, but they can move up or down in pitch as you like. And this can be useful in producing a counterpoint to your main melody, especially if your main melody is (as previously stated above) so well fortified and presented so strongly. In addition, a strong melody with a strong harmonic counterpoint sounds much "larger" and fuller.

You can have all of those things you mentioned and still keep every chord in root position. Keeping something in root position only means that the bass will be playing the root of each chord. I believe you're talking more about voicings, not inversions. I prefer to try and keep all of my chords open voiced when possible. Block chords are rarely something you want to work with, because they sound clunky and usually get in the way of the melod(y/ies). That's not to say you can't even have chords in inversions- sometimes when a chord has a passing function it makes much more sense to move the bass in a stepwise motion.

When you work with choirs (3 or 4 part) following voice leading procedures is standard. However, when you're writing this epic orchestral music, you want each chord to sound rock solid. The best way to have a chord feel like it has a strong foundation is to put it in root position. The rest of the voices can (and should, ideally) be properly voice led, but the bass is a different beast in my eyes.

A few months back I created a musical example of what I'm talking about. Have a listen to this to hear what I mean. The clip contains two examples. The first example contains a simple chord progression but uses poor voice leading, an lots of cluttered voicings. The second example (0:20+) takes the exact same chords, but properly voice leads, spaces the parts out correctly, and the bass has a much better choice of notes (mostly root position chords, except for the cadential 6/4 chord at the end).


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PenguinSam
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Response to Epic Orchestral Music 2009-04-07 18:39:47 Reply

People have told me that this song has a very full sound to it, so enjoy!

  • <PS> Antarctica
    <PS> Antarctica by PenguinSam

    Click to listen.

    Score
    4.10 / 5.00
    Type
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    Genre
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    Popularity
    270 Views

<PS>


The Last Lullaby
Throughout her lullaby we wishes to say goodbye, but she can only say goodnight.

HalcyonicFalconX
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Response to Epic Orchestral Music 2009-04-07 18:45:40 Reply

At 4/7/09 01:00 PM, DavidOrr wrote: Words of wisdom.

Well said. And also well proven. I guess I slightly misunderstood what you had originally meant.
^_^

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Response to Epic Orchestral Music 2009-04-08 19:18:48 Reply

I refuse to release anything else until it is of incredible quality. Ive been trying to split up projects and do as much as I can to get an almost true epic sound.

Ive hit that point where, if it's not much much MUCH better than my old stuff, I wont put it up. I just listen to my old tracks and shudder. Urck. yuck! I will not rest until I get that Immediate music sound!!!!


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Response to Epic Orchestral Music 2009-04-08 19:30:20 Reply

At 4/7/09 01:00 PM, DavidOrr wrote: words

When you voice chords for an orchestral piece do you have parallel octaves and fifths not including pedal tones. I've been told to avoid using them if I can.

DavidOrr
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Response to Epic Orchestral Music 2009-04-08 20:13:16 Reply

At 4/8/09 07:30 PM, Mrmilkcarton wrote:
At 4/7/09 01:00 PM, DavidOrr wrote: words
When you voice chords for an orchestral piece do you have parallel octaves and fifths not including pedal tones. I've been told to avoid using them if I can.

Nope- I'd avoid those when possible. The thing is, if you follow strict voice leading practices (as was done by Bach and countless others) you should NEVER have parallel octaves and fifths. Some rules can be broken under certain circumstances, but the only instance I can think of where parallel 5ths can be accepted is when you're using a German Augmented 6 chord to a V chord (which you won't encounter a lot). Modern music is such that anything goes. However, since a lot of the tonal music we base our studies off of follow standard voice leading practices, our ears have developed in a way that parallel octaves and fifths sound strange (they stick out to me like a sore thumb because I'm so used to avoiding them). So, it's not that you CAN'T use them, but you should avoid using them if you're striving for smooth voices.

In an orchestral setting, when parts are doubled (i.e a cello part doubled in the bass), parallels are acceptable because the two parts are considered one unique line.

So, in short, you should not use parallel octaves or 5ths, unless you are doubling parts between instruments. Hopefully that made sense, let me know if something is confusing!


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BrokenDeck
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Response to Epic Orchestral Music 2009-04-09 00:15:37 Reply

At 4/8/09, DavidOrr, HalcyonicFalconX, and Mrmilkcarton wrote:

STUFF

Hmm keep in mind, you can break these rules and still sound great. For example, take into considering Igor Stravinsky and John Williams. Off the top of my head I can tell you they didn't exactly follow the "rules" in many of their compositions. You might even say that John Williams might have gotten some of his inspirations from Igor Stravinsky. I don't know if that is true, but some of his soundtracks certainly sound like it... meh enough of my blabbering... i don't really know what i'm talking about... I think...