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Credits & Info

Uploaded
Mar 7, 2017 | 2:53 AM EST
File Info
Song
13.4 MB
5 min 51 sec
Score
5.00 / 5.00

Related Content

Licensing Terms

Please contact me if you would like to use this in a project. We can discuss the details.

Score:
Rated 5.00 / 5 stars
Plays & Downloads:
659 Plays | 14 Downloads
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Genres:
Easy Listening - Classical
Tags:
piano
dark
religious
ambient

Author Comments

Minimal processed piano piece using Arvo Pärt's tintinnabulation technique. Fragmented piano bits in the background created using custom software created in max/msp.

I've made a video to go along with this. Animation was coded from scratch in Java.
https://vimeo.com/206977800

For more information on this track, to download files, or to inquire about using this track in your project, please visit: http://sleepfacingwest.com/sleepfacingwest/2017/3/7/gl022-seldom-spoken

Sometimes I miss messages on New Grounds. For business inquiries, please message me at sleepfacingwest@gmail.com

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Reviews


larrynachoslarrynachos

Rated 5 / 5 stars

tch, some of your uploads slipped past me. This is incredible work!


People find this review helpful!
sleepFacingWest responds:

Thanks. Every once in a rare while I get to work on something I actually like.


entertheeggentertheegg

Rated 4.5 / 5 stars

I'm surprised your work isn't more popular, it sounds really professional and you obviously know a lot about composition. I liked this piece, it reminded me of some of Max Ricther's work. The trilling/distorting piano fragments are really interesting, adds a lot of depths to the sound. In fact teh whole thing sounds really three dimensional and engrossing.
Glad to have stumbled across you!
(Also really interesting to hear about this tintinnabuli technique, something i'd never heard of)


People find this review helpful!
sleepFacingWest responds:

Thanks! Yeah, tintinnabulation is great, but tends to force a very specific sound. Thanks for the comparison to Max Richter. I love his work (though haven't followed a lot of what he's been doing in recent years).