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Credits & Info

Uploaded
Nov 20, 2011 | 10:59 PM EST
File Info
Song
4.9 MB
2 min 8 sec
Score
4.33 / 5.00

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Licensing Terms

Please contact me if you would like to use this in a project. We can discuss the details.

Score:
Rated 4.33 / 5 stars
Plays & Downloads:
918 Plays | 43 Downloads
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Genres:
Easy Listening - Classical
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Author Comments

Here's an original three-movement musical interpretation of some selected parts of Arthur Miller's play The Crucible. I hope to eventually make this into a six to ten movement piece concerning various events in the book as a full piece, so judge this as a WIP. I plan to expand the 3rd movement more eventually, but I'd like to hear some thoughts first. :)

Movement 1: Dancing in the Woods
Movement 2: Proctor the Yeoman-Farmer
Movement 3: Hale Arrives (the melody is based off of the traditional folk-song "My Thing is My Own"*)

Produced in Finale 2009 using the EWQL Symphonic Orchestra (gold)

Constructive criticism is more than welcome- I would love to hear some critique on mastering and instrumentation, yet any interpretive things you think should be changed are welcome too. :)

Thanks for listening!
-Samulis

*If you don't know this song, know that it's a traditional song from (at latest) the 18th century in which a woman sings about crushing the advances of various men... It's not really that fitting with Hale, but I loved the melody from the first time I heard it, so I decided to incorporate it in a work somewhere.

Reviews


NekoMikaNekoMika

Rated 4.5 / 5 stars

Sounds calming

I like the idea of this song. It has a calm feel as if we were watching a battle that had ended and then we see the people walking away carrying and holding each other up as they see the body of the boss behind them and move on trying to think of how to make it all better in the end while the boss's boss plans to destroy the planet without his minion's help. Great beat.

The orchestra here sounds very calming and I love how the flute seems to move you a little bit to the happy side as the beat moves and carries itself. The light use of tribal drums here was really great in my opinion giving that feel of making them all the better.

The dark sounding instrument was nice but what was it? The harp was also nice to hear. Very nice.

Overall ,great song, sounds very happy.

Review Request Club


samulis responds:

The ominous tone you hear at the beginning is a trick first pioneered by Mahler in his First Symphony- "Titan". It consists of a violin section playing a harmonic (note up an octave due to finger position) and a double-bass playing a low unison of that note... about 4 or 5 octaves apart. It creates one of the best musical devices I've ever heard and I really wanted to incorporate the basic idea, but build on it with a new style (i.e. what you hear at 1:00).

If you've listened to a lot of my other pieces, you've probably noticed I'm a stickler for the full orchestral treatment... bass drum, snare, chimes, cymbals. Here I chose a simplified treatment and replaced the snare and bass combo with a basic 'tribal drum' as more of an experimental aspect and once again to fit into the literal crucible of music of that era, at least a little bit.


HaggardHaggard

Rated 4.5 / 5 stars

Good song, nice idea

This is a very good song. I like the idea of turning "The Crucible" into a song. The medival instruments are very fitting here, since the play takes place in the 17th cenutry, after all.

I also like the transitions between the various parts. It sounds as if the song is over, but just before the last note of the previous part rings out the next part starts. I like that a lot.

Maybe the first part "Dancing in the Woods" could have a slightly more mystic atmosphere to it. Right now it sounds a bit too happy to me and not like some occultic thing going on in the depths of the woods.

{ Review Request Club }


samulis responds:

Thanks for the feedback, I'll look into a more mystic approach to dancing in the woods during the happier bits (perhaps some minor stuff).