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Credits & Info

Date
04/01/2008
File Info
Song
2.9 MB
2 min 13 sec
Score
4.06 / 5.00

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Licensing Terms

Attribution:
You must give credit to the artist.
Noncommercial:
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If you alter, transform, or build upon this image, you may distribute the resulting creation only under a license identical to this one.
Score:
Rated 4.06 / 5 stars
Plays & Downloads:
2,751 Plays | 174 Downloads
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Genres:
Easy Listening - Classical
Tags:
None

Author Comments

Adagio for woodwinds accompanied by orchestra in A minor.

I'm getting the hang of orchestration. Next time, I'll try brass.
This was originally a battle score, but turned out better the way it is now.

The first melody represents the joy of being a father. Even though I'm not a father myself, a close friend of mine is. He shares with me his experiences, and I can tell how hard and yet how beautiful having a child is.
The second melody represents the innocent happiness of being a child, for having a loving family. Any child laughs, runs, plays with his/her friends and family no matter the situation. Because being a kid you realize that there is nothing better than enjoying life for life itself; for being alive.

Anyway, I hope you enjoy it.

Reviews


Prid-OutingPrid-Outing

Rated 5 / 5 stars

AAAHHHH!

LOVED IT! Makes me think of my past and its a vary peaceful and relaxing song!

AHHH


Fuoco responds:

:D

:3


TheSilverGuitarTheSilverGuitar

Rated 5 / 5 stars

Simple... Yet powerful

It was pretty simple, as far as the instruments go, but that's what you were going for, right? I liked it, somehow it reminded me of Young Link from Ocarina of Time.


Fuoco responds:

I like ocarina of time :D

It was meant to be simple, but I always wanted to compose something complicated keeping a catchy melody. I'd like to see my sheet music full of instruments, full of notes.
I hope Rimsky's guide to orchestration help a little to do that.

I'm glad you liked it!


niunniun

Rated 5 / 5 stars

wow!

that was amazing and very peaceful. i bet that this would fit in perfectly with a game or flash. i realy cant think of anything bad to say about this.its just perfect.very very nice job.keep it up :)


Fuoco responds:

Why, thank you good sir.


LanceLance

Rated 4.5 / 5 stars

It's a keeper

Now I don't normally review tracks that I find really good, but I thought I'd drop some words. This piece of music goes beyond solid and works wonderfully for its intended lullaby/young child themes. LOL, I really don't see how this was a battle theme at one time.

I really don't like orchestral or classical music, but the more peaceful, quaint songs really get to me, so this a definite download for later listening, for sure.

Wonderful choice of instruments, I would say the combination of the harp/oboe/flute/glockenspiel couldn't get any friendlier. Or should I say gay in a 1950s sense ;)

I love the melodical themes, awesome, serene blend of chords. I really like how the harp arpeggios kind of flow into the glockenspiel melodies, making them play as a seamless background over the high and low voice ranges. You also break the patterns up a bit, instead of just making them consectuive 8th or 16th notes, making those parts more interesting. The oboe part is truly beautiful, it's one of those melodies that feels like heaven when each note hits your ears. While the oboe melody plays it's role in being more of a relaxer, when the flute comes in the piece starts to take off, as if a child is getting out of his bed and ready for the exciting day ahead. And the strings beautifully layer and highlight the beauty of the track itself. You sure did a great job of organizing the theme and conscientiously spreading it throughout all the instruments in the track. Very coherent, which doesn't sound like an easy task.

I can't say I agree with David. While his knowledge on music is lightyears ahead of mine, I don't see the need to build chords from the strings, I think they do their job as maintaining that background for the lead voicings to flow over, without being too powerful or weak. But what do I know lol.

Hmm, I'm not sure if I really like the melodies on the glockenspiel. I see where the idea comes in to play, but it does feel like it's lacking a bit of direction. There is a lot of activity in the higher registers, but I don't know what instrument to suggest since the harp is playing (maybe switch the glockenspiel part with the harp part, not sure how that would sound), or take it out all together, and use it to play "fragments" of one of the melodies, kind of like in the intro.

Percussion...ahh, I like the subtleness of it, any more complex or thorough instrumentation in this department might kill the song. I guess it wouldn't hurt to put more variation on the castanet, as it sounds mostly if not exactly just like a metronome (maybe every four bars or so, you would break from the 1-2-3-4 rhythm and maybe 1-2-3 & 4 &, just a simple change). Also, while the rhythm fits the flute themes, I don't think it sits well (feels too fast) with the first oboe theme, so i would suggest transitioning back into the slower percussion parts like you use in the beginning.

Doesn't seem like there's a whole lot of movement going on in the bass ranges, the only note that ever breaches in that area is the root note of the harp arpeggios and that one timpani (bass drum?) hit. For a more light hearted track, I think the focus lies in the higher melodies, so no big deal here. But maybe once you bring the glockenspiel in, maybe then incorporate some bass strings in then, so the ending will be more climatic and full.

Also, your sequencing is amazing. Each section molds together flawlessly, and the melodies between the oboe and flute connect very well. When you go into the ending section, that came off as a bit abrupt, as the glockenspiel chords never really resolved. I also really like the final chord you ended on, as it feels very resolute yet not entirely tonal.

I somewhat agree with Gronmon regarding the cymbal, maybe it is to "aggressive" for this piece and maybe windchimes would be a more eloquent instrument to substitue in the cymbals place...

Anyways, not sure if my advice is going to be all that helpful as again I really have no classical training, but what I do now for fact is that this track is indeed a keeper!


People find this review helpful!
Fuoco responds:

Holy nuts! A 9 from you it's really something.

No way this is gay... in a 1950 sense. It's not in the major scale! ;)
Flute sounds gay though.

I'm glad you like the melody, for me it's the most important part of a song. And thank you for all these kind words, it certainly wasn't easy to compose harmony. It's my weak point, and I was afraid I might ruin the melody with poor constructed harmony. I'm going through again right now with another song, wish me luck!

I think David meant those words for the first melody in the second segment, after the second melody played. Doubling the melody without anything else playing something else, except for the harp, was a bit overpowered and I knew it from the begining.. but I couldn't of think of anything else at the moment.

Switching an instrument for another sounds interesting, I don't think I'll edit this song any sooner but I'll take it in consideration for the next piece.

About percussion, I can see what you're saying. For the oboe part I tried to use the same rhythm as the begining, but it sounded like a very drastic change from fast to slow. But your idea of 1,2,3 & 4 & change is fantastic and this I WILL edit it. Thank you for that.

It is a bass drum. I didn't felt like adding much of bass becaue it would lose it's childish feeling. Your idea for the ending I'm not sure how it'll work for this piece, but I can tell it might sound great for a sad piece.

Heh, a lot of people complains about the abrupt ending. Didn't felt too abrupt for me, but I should keep the audience happy. And yeah, I like the final chord too. Sounds a bit dramatic.

Windchimes for transition... I just opened GPO because I couldn't recall the sound of windchimes. I must admit I never took it into consideration, but I can tell it might sound heavenly and would contribute to the childish feeling.

You bet your advices are certainly helpful. It's hard to believe you have no classical training, but heck, neither do I. Your knowledge is impressive.

Thank you for spending your time on reviewing this, Lance.
I greatly appreciate it.


GronmonSEGronmonSE

Rated 5 / 5 stars

Very nice.

Viva Mexico, cabrones :D

Ahem...

Great song. I love how all the instruments blend in flawlessly. The introduction of strings is excellent and they add a lot to the piece. The only "problem" I see is the cymbal used in 1:15 . I feel like it doesn't fit in with the rest of the instruments. As a matter of fact, I think it's awful :P

Imagery...mine's slightly different. It reminds me of childhood more than anything else. Probably someone getting a flashback, thinking about his dearest moments as a child.

Very peaceful track, nice work.


Fuoco responds:

VIVA!!

I'm not quite a patriot anyway...

About the cymbal, it was originally written for a rock drumkit cymbal and I found something similar in GPO. The weird thing is that in the actual playing it sounded the way it sounds now, and it's the same cymbal I used for my other song "The Wind Warrior". Weird, maybe it's not the same but it's still confusing. Maybe that cymbal preceded by a reverse cymbal would make it sound better, but I don't feel like adding or changing anything at the moment.

The flashback imagery is nice. To tell the truth, I wasn't thinking of anything when composing this song. Once finished, I had to think of something say in the author comments. But shhh! Don't tell anyone! ;D

Thanks for reviewing!