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Notes From a Large Walrus

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Credits & Info

Views
6,014
Score
4.33 / 5.00

Uploaded
Aug 20, 2010 | 8:11 PM EDT
Category
Illustration
File Info
1025 x 700 px
JPG
796.4 kb
Tags
music
walrus
trumpet
tusks

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Author Comments

As it turns out, great big tusks and exceedingly whiskery whiskers are no hindrance to successful trumpeting. Humphrey Lyttelton would be proud.

Created for a splendid friend who goes by the web-name of GH-Mongo, this picture stars his musical walrus character Sforzando and was produced using 100 per cent traditional methods, with actual ink used for the lines and actual pencils used for the colouring, resulting in actual hand tendons snapping off and flying out of the window. You have to suffer for your art.

Reviews


Ganonn93Ganonn93

Rated 4.5 / 5 stars

Very very good

A great job, nothing to say.
But I will give you a 9 / 10 because there is something that unfortunately I can not appreciate: the hands ... I know I'm a damn picky but I can not help it ... I think you had had to keep the walrus flippers instead of hands to replace them (although I imagine that you have done for the obvious reason that playing a trumpet with the fins is a little difficult, but for me this would have added that pinch of hilarity that it takes especially with this kind of pictures which resemble those of Walt Disney).
However I must point out again that it is a really wonderful job especially considering the fact that it was retouched with a computer.


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GreyTheVIIIGreyTheVIII

Rated 5 / 5 stars

Whoa!

You are a master at traditional art! What kind of pen did you use to make that awesome piece of work. Also what color pencils did you use as well? Continue to making awesome artwork! :)


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MatthewSmith responds:

For the inking I used a Pilot G-Tec pen (fast-drying ink, and you can vary the strength of lines quite easily), and for the colours I employed a mixture of Derwent Watercolour and Karisma pencils. Sadly, Karisma pencils have now been discontinued (I still have quite a few in a big box, although various colours are beginning to dwindle), but I've recently discovered a new brand (produced by Caran d'Ache) called Luminance, which are just as good.

Many thanks indeed for the kind words!