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Ancient Tomb

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Credits & Info

Views
4,243
Score
3.53 / 5.00

Date
04/10/2012
Category
3D Art
File Info
1440 x 900 px
PNG
5.7 mb
Tags
ancient
gold
tomb
3d

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Author Comments

This is a scene of a Ancient Tomb. This was one of my most ambitious projects to date and I learned a lot while building it.

Thanks for viewing.

Reviews


m1kclarkm1kclark

Rated 3.5 / 5 stars

Pros: Nice models, excellent textures, great placement, well-chosen colors
Cons: lighting, specularity, fire, bump maps

Detailed critique: The biggest problem with the image is the specularity. Different real-world materials have different specular highlights, where gold should have a very bright, very white specular color, but wood or stone should have almost no specularity. Right now, your stone-work has the same specular shading as the gold bars and the gold inlay on the altar's base, when we should really see the gold gleaming on that overlayed-circles pattern. The gold bars also have the problem that the reflections are too mirror-like; you want the reflections to be purely gold-colored and to be more obscure than the mirror-like appearance you have. (There are ways to control these settings in any program.) Switching from the gold to the stone, you need more bump-maps. Actual stone is rough, and those textures you have suggest that the stone is *really* rough, less like slate and more like granite. That means its surface roughness should *match* its color, and that illusion is missing.

Finally, the lighting needs work. It is not clear what the lighting sources are, and you have to think very carefully about that. It seems that there are two lamps where the torches are, which makes sense, but you have point-source lights when the light offered by fire is much "blurrier" so to speak. There's a thing called an "area-light" in some 3D programs that would serve you well here: the light is generated across a square instead of all from a point, which gives you softer shadows. Your shadows are very precise and rigid, as if lit from a stage spot-light. It would also be nice to add a texture to the light source (if you can even do that) since the light offered by fire is not as uniform as modern electrical light sources. The last detail is to consider how the light decays: are two torches really enough to illuminate that back wall? Should it maybe be darker? Note that "decay rate" is separate from "brightness", and it can really alter the appearance of a scene when you adjust them individually.

On the other hand, you made excellent use of some nicely-designed textures here! And you mapped them onto geometries that are simple, but they still provide the proper ambiance. The textures are good enough to convince the audience that these items were made before the era of Caesar's Rome. The reason I hammered so much on the details above is that, especially in 3D art, human perception is really good at saying, "How ridiculously fake!" and then your audience will disregard your work even when it is 98% perfect. After glancing at your gallery, this is your best work so far.

Good luck, and I look forward to more!


ghostwalker91 responds:

Thank you very much for your review. I'm sill new to a lot of aspects of 3d modeling, but with each I create and with great reviews like this one I learn more and more about it.